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Raab’s Bill of Rights is shelved for the THIRD time so ministers can focus on the Canal migrant crisis

Bill of Rights shelved for the THIRD time: Dominic Raab’s signature act suspended again so ministers can focus on law on Canal migrant crisis

  • Dominic Raab’s Bill of Rights to be shelved so ministers can focus on border
  • Rishi Sunak and Mr. Raab are discussing which parts of the bill are top priorities
  • Sunak said he will be de-prioritized in favor of tackling the Canal issue.

Dominic Raab’s Bill of Rights will be shelved so the Government can prioritize more limited legislation to address the Small Craft Canal crisis.

In a jab at the Justice Secretary, No 10 has kicked its flagship legislation, revising the Human Rights Act, in the tall grass.

Rishi Sunak and Mr. Raab, who is also the deputy prime minister, are understood to be debating which parts of the bill are top priorities. But it is now unlikely to go through Parliament as a whole, amid fears it will take too long and could be largely amended.

If Mr. Sunak decides not to file, it would be the third time Mr. Raab’s legislation has been abandoned.

Dominic Raab’s Bill of Rights will be shelved so the Government can prioritize more limited legislation to address the Small Craft Canal crisis.

The prime minister told him this week that he would be ‘de-prioritised’ in favor of tackling the Canal issue. Sources said the Attorney General was said to still be ‘100 per cent committed to the bill and it remained ‘one of Dom’s top priorities’.

Some parts of the bill are likely to be incorporated into small craft legislation, while other elements could be added to separate legislation.

Ministers are expected to go ahead with plans to ease the deportation of foreign criminals by restricting the circumstances in which their right to family life would take precedence over public safety. The government is also likely to go ahead with plans to confirm that the interim rulings of the European Court of Human Rights, which stopped the first flight to deport migrants to Rwanda, are not binding on UK courts.

Raab produced a green paper on David Cameron’s Bill of Rights, but it was delayed due to the EU referendum.

He then revived plans as justice secretary under Boris Johnson, but Liz Truss scrapped the bill when it entered number 10.

When Sunak reappointed Raab for the court report, he insisted that the bill would return in the “next few weeks.”

Rishi Sunak Told Mr Raab This Week That The 'Priority Would Be Withdrawn' In Favor Of Tackling The Canal Issue. The Number Of Migrants Who Have Crossed The English Channel In Small Boats So Far This Year Has Now Reached Almost 43,900, According To Official Government Figures.

Rishi Sunak told Mr Raab this week that the ‘priority would be withdrawn’ in favor of tackling the Canal issue. The number of migrants who have crossed the English Channel in small boats so far this year has now reached almost 43,900, according to official government figures.

He said last month that it “builds on the UK’s proud tradition of freedom by strengthening free speech, reinjecting a healthy dose of common sense into the system and ending the abuse of our laws.”

Mr. Raab said that he would deal with foreign criminals who abuse the right to article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights: the right to family life.

Released in March, the legislation was meant to make freedom of expression a ‘trump card’ over other rights, prohibiting judges from creating European-style privacy laws. Legal experts predicted that he would face difficulties getting through the Lords.

A Downing Street source added: “All parliamentary business will be described in the usual way.”

Raab, who is under investigation for three formal allegations about his conduct, told MPs a fortnight ago: ‘We have a big bill here. This is an important constitutional step forward.’

But the sweeping 44-page bill could face trouble in the Conservative seats if it reaches the House of Commons.

It was branded “worse than useless” by Raab’s predecessor, Robert Buckland. “It threatens to generate a whole range of internal laws that don’t really fit into the English common law tradition,” he told The Spectator last month.

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Jacky

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