Quorn sets the ‘farm for shopping’ CO2 footprint details of its most popular products

Quorn puts the “farm for shopping” on the label of carbon footprint details of its most popular products – and has called on other brands to do the same

  • The information will let customers know what the CO2 impact of the product is
  • It will initially be available for the top 20 products on the Quorn website
  • The company said the details will be on labels by the end of the year
  • It has called on other companies and brands to follow the example of ‘improving the choice’

Vegetarian food giant Quorn is going to include the carbon footprint details of every product it sells on the package, the company confirmed.

The ‘farm for shopping’ information will initially be on its website, but will later be included on the labels of the 30 most popular products, including minced meat and nuggets.

The British meat-free food producer is the first major brand to announce that it will include details of third-party carbon footprint on its products.

The company says it is essential information for people who want to live a more environmentally friendly lifestyle and called on other brands to follow this example.

The information shows the amount of CO2 emissions produced per kilogram of each product and has been verified by the Carbon Trust, an independent group.

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The 'farm for shopping' information will initially be on its website, but will later be included on the labels of the 30 most popular products, including minced meat and nuggets. They have compared the amount of CO2 per kg for a series of products

The ‘farm for shopping’ information will initially be on its website, but will later be included on the labels of the 30 most popular products, including minced meat and nuggets. They have compared the amount of CO2 per kg for a series of products

It also shows the amount of carbon dioxide equivalent per kg that has gone into the production of that product – for example Quorn minced meat is 1.2 kg CO2e / kg.

That is 1.2 kg (42 oz) of carbon dioxide equivalent for every kilogram of the product.

The company is also working with the Carbon Trust to find ways to further reduce the impact on the environment to ultimately achieve net zero emissions.

Quorn products made from “mycroprotein” made it possible to save 200,000 tons of CO2 emissions compared to meat equivalents in 2019, the company said.

This is because the greenhouse gas effect of mycroprotein is 90 percent lower than that of beef, a spokesperson said.

“In recent years, consumer demand for alternatives to meat has grown that we could not have expected,” said Louise Needham, sustainability manager at Quorn.

“We are incredibly proud that we have reduced our environmental activities by scaling up our activities and selling our products.”

A YouGov study into eating habits showed that 50 percent of people say they eat meat-free for purely environmental reasons.

The same consumer survey showed that 64 percent want to reduce their carbon footprint to protect future generations.

“We have been delivering Healthy Protein for a Healthy Planet for over 30 years,” said the spokesperson.

“We are pleased to be able to offer our customers carbon footprint data that we know is actively trying to find ways to reduce their impact on the planet.”

He said it is important for the climate to give people the information they need to make informed decisions about the food they eat.

It is delivered in the same way as nutritional information and is clearly labeled, so that a call is made to other brands to “come with us” when providing the information.

He added: “We hope that if other food brands follow, we can make better comparisons in our shopping baskets.”

The information shows the amount of carbon dioxide equivalent per kg that has gone into the production of that product – for example Quorn minced meat is 1.2 kg CO2e / kg

As part of the preparation process to share information about its carbon footprint, Quorn wanted to explore how his core products relate to alternatives to animals.

The company discovered that its alternatives to beef, such as minced meat, were 13 times lower than the meat version.

For chicken-like products such as fillets and pieces, the footprint was four times lower than meat.

Hugh Jones, director of the Carbon Trust, said, “It’s really important that consumers have solid information to inform their purchases.”

Quorn was originally established in 1985 as a joint venture between Rank Hovis McDougall and Imperial Chemical Industries.

It was sold in 2015 to the Philippines-based food producer Monde Nissin.

What is Quorn meat substitute made of?

  • Quorn was developed as a meat alternative in 1960 by British scientists amid fear of food shortages
  • Launched in 1985 by Marlow Foods, it now sold 4 billion items
  • More than a hundred protein-rich products, ranging from sausage to schnitzel
  • Made from soil fungus Fusarium venenatum and grown using fermentation – a process similar to beer production
  • Foods approved by Olympian Sir Mo Farah and footballer Jermain Defoe
  • Now owned by the Filipino food conglomerate Monde Nissin

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