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Queensland police inquiry told of disgusting comments made about domestic abuse survivors

A Queensland police officer has accused colleagues of domestic violence survivors being ‘too ugly to be raped’ or ‘deserved it’ in shocking testimonies.

The officer, who cannot be named to protect his identity, revealed a toxic culture of police that humiliated victims with comments such as “domestic violence is just foreplay,” “rape is just surprise sex” and “I can see why he’s doing it.” to her. †

“The misogyny is just so wild, and that supports our attitude towards female survivors of victims,” ​​the officer told police. Independent Commission of Inquiry into Queensland Police’s responses to domestic and family violence on Wednesday.

An officer gave shocking testimony in an investigation into the Queensland police's response to domestic violence, saying his colleagues made disgusting comments about rape that was 'deserved'.

An officer gave shocking testimony in an investigation into the Queensland police’s response to domestic violence, saying his colleagues made disgusting comments about rape that was ‘deserved’.

The officer said his colleagues would avoid calls for domestic violence and even send victims away from police counters.

“We certainly received emails from the officer in charge stating that ‘someone is claiming DV should be reported to the desk,'” the officer said.

‘But I’ve certainly seen the case where people are turned away or there has been discussion about ‘I’m not going to do anything with this, but should I put it on as a street check?’

“No, don’t, because if there’s an audit, you’ll have to report to the SP.”

The officer said half of the officers at his station made extremely abusive comments about women, which were almost universally endorsed by their peers.

The officer said half of the officers at his station made extremely abusive comments about women, which were almost universally endorsed by their peers.

Victims of domestic violence were more likely to be helped if they were attractive, well-educated and well-dressed, the officer testified.

The officer said he was in a police car with another officer who drove off to avoid a report of domestic violence.

His colleagues sometimes believed that a domestic violence order was an attempt by a woman to ‘screw’ him [the respondent] in the family court’.

By his estimate, the officer said half of his colleagues at the station made misogynistic comments, which received near-universal approval.

“But if we look at the people who laugh with that kind of behavior, it’s over 90.95 percent. Like most people,’ the officer said.

The study found that officers avoided calls for domestic violence and shunned victims, even sending them away from police stations

The study found that officers avoided calls for domestic violence and shunned victims, even sending them away from police stations

Derogatory terms were common for women, whether they were victims, co-workers, or wives.

“We have a ‘C***y McC*** face,’ ‘c***,'” the officer said.

‘Like ‘f***ing bitch’, ‘f***ing slut’, ‘mole’.

He also said male officers would routinely sexually harass female colleagues and tell them to show more cleavage or “I’d tap that.”

The officer testified that some of his colleagues displayed “red flags” indicating coercive and controlling behavior by their partners or ex-partners.

“One of the other members … who had done something with a partner said very angrily, ‘I will kill her,’ referring to his ex-partner,” the officer told the investigation.

The Queensland Police Response to Domestic Violence Investigation Will Take Four Months

The Queensland Police Response to Domestic Violence Investigation Will Take Four Months

The officer said derogatory terms were part of the “vocabulary” of police work and that racism was endemic.

Indigenous people were referred to as ‘ATSIs’ or ‘savages’ and a general racist feeling expressed at the station was that ‘ATSIs were getting out of hand’.

Those with criminal convictions were known as “larvae,” while those with mental health problems were “spoons.”

Queensland Police have responded to the officer’s evidence by saying that the police encouraged such testimonies to improve their lives.

“The QPS will work with the Commission of Inquiry to investigate and respond to these issues to ensure that organizational values, standards of practice and responsibilities are maintained and enhanced where the opportunity arises,” a spokesperson said.

“The QPS also looks forward to working further with the Commission of Inquiry and receiving its recommendations.

“We are committed to strengthening and improving our response to domestic and family violence to ensure the service supports all victims and holds perpetrators accountable.”

The investigation into police responses to domestic violence is led by Queensland Children’s Court President Deborah Richards and will last four months.

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