Queensland carpenter receives surprise visit to Cassowary in workshop

The world’s most dangerous bird called ‘Romper Stomper’ stuns Australian carpenter after he walks into his shed – as cassowary has been found to love plums and often stops at the local pub

  • Carpenter received the world’s most dangerous bird as a visitor in shed in Queensland
  • Tony Fleming was working on wood furniture when Cassowary walked in
  • Cassowaries are extremely deadly with claws as long as 10 cm. can grow tall


A carpenter got the fright of his life when the world’s most dangerous bird walked into his workshop.

Tony Fleming was working on wooden furniture when a cassowary walked into his barn in Juletten, north Queensland.

“For a period of about a year, the cassowary wandered about on my property, munching plums and whatever feeds it,” he said.

“One day it just squirmed into my shed.”

A carpenter was shocked when the world’s most dangerous bird walked into his workshop

Cassowaries are considered the deadliest bird in the world, despite their extremely shy nature.

They can grow up to 1.8 meters high and weigh up to 70 kilograms. Their paws can deliver powerful kicks and their claws can grow up to 10 inches long.

Mr Fleming said he was alarmed at first but soon realized the bird just wanted to inspect his shed.

“I had friends on the road who had never seen the cassowary,” he said. “One of them was a photographer, so they came over and took a picture.”

The cassowary was well known in the town and even occasionally popped into the local pub.

“My wife was celebrating her 50th birthday and there were a lot of campers on our property,” said Mr Fleming.

Tony Fleming was working on wooden furniture when a cassowary walked into his barn in North Queensland's Juletten

Tony Fleming was working on wooden furniture when a cassowary walked into his barn in North Queensland’s Juletten

“We woke up in the morning to find it wandering around the campground and everyone was feeding it like a pet.”

The cassowary was so loved that it was even nicknamed ‘Romper Stomper’.

Mr Fleming admitted that ‘Romper Stomper’ had an aggressive side and did not get along with all the locals.

“A man in the local pub had been attacked,” he said. “He was wandering down the road and this thing came before him. He survived. He was fine.’

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