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Queensland ‘blitz’ on e-scooter speed limit, helmet use, and mobile phone distraction

Nanny State’s New Low: Cops With Radar Guns See E-Scooter Drivers Fined For Speeding – As Authorities Crack Down On New Technology

  • Queensland Police now targeting e-scooter riders who exceed the speed limit
  • E-scooters are limited to 12 km/h on footpaths and 25 km/h on shared footpaths
  • The use of helmets and bells will be made mandatory later this year and telephone use will be prohibited
  • Transport and Highways Minister Mark Bailey said it will keep transport safe

The Queensland government has announced it will crack down on e-scooter riders in a new ‘blitz’ targeting speeding, helmet use and mobile phone distraction.

Speed ​​limits for e-scooter riders traveling on sidewalks were introduced in February, but the government has warned that more rules will be enforced before the end of the year.

The warning comes as a Reddit user shared a video on Tuesday of police using speed radar to fine an e-scooter rider on Victoria Bridge, in Brisbane.

E-scooter riders in Brisbane (above) will soon be required to wear helmets and not use their phones when traveling on public footpaths

E-scooter riders in Brisbane (above) will soon be required to wear helmets and not use their phones when traveling on public footpaths

For e-scooter riders there is a limit of 12 km/h on footpaths and 25 km/h on ‘shared’ pedestrian and bicycle paths. Riders caught breaking the speed limit face a $130 fine.

The speeding fine will be increased from November 1, along with the introduction of mandatory helmet and bell use for e-scooter riders.

The government said it will also ban the use of a cell phone while riding an e-scooter later this year.

“We will increase penalties for high-risk offenses to ensure e-scooter riders are aware of the consequences of unsafe driving,” said Transport and Highways Minister Mark Bailey.

“This includes speeding, using a mobile phone while driving and driving on prohibited roads.”

Mr Bailey said the new rules are an important step to ensure e-scooters are a safe mode of transport in Queensland.

“E-scooters aren’t going anywhere – if anything, their use continues to gain popularity with those who want to leave the car behind or take public transport,” said Transport and Highways Secretary Mark Bailey.

The Queensland government introduced speed limits on footpaths in February but said it would take further action against e-scooter riders later this year

The Queensland government introduced speed limits on footpaths in February but said it would take further action against e-scooter riders later this year

“That’s why it’s important that we have a plan on how we can improve safety for e-scooter riders and for those who use our bike paths, footpaths and roads.”

Bailey said the government is also working on creating parking areas for e-scooters in high-traffic areas and putting up speed limit signs.

The crackdown on e-scooter riders is supported by the Queensland Police Service.

“Earlier this year we announced that speeds on sidewalks would be halved to 12 kilometers per hour, which was a very important step in reducing dangerous, high-speed interactions between pedestrians and riders,” he said.

A Redditor shared on Tuesday a video of police using speed radars to fine e-scooter riders on Victoria Bridge, in Brisbane (above)

A Redditor shared on Tuesday a video of police using speed radars to fine e-scooter riders on Victoria Bridge, in Brisbane (above)

“This was a quick win and pushes us in the right direction to support our move towards greater regulatory reform.

The blitzes are intended to target people who drive dangerously, such as speeding, using a mobile phone, carrying passengers or not wearing a helmet.

“They will be focusing on Brisbane’s urban areas where e-scooter use is particularly high, so I’m asking everyone to do the right thing – not just when the police are around, but any time you get behind the wheel.” crawls.’

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