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Queen playfully nicknames her satnav the ‘woman under the bonnet’ 

The ONLY person giving instructions to Her Majesty! Queen, 96, playfully calls her sat nav the ‘woman under the hood’ – and finds the GPS voice ‘quite funny’

  • The 96-year-old queen has nicknamed her navigation system ‘the woman under the hood’.
  • Sources have revealed that Her Majesty finds the instructive voice ‘quite funny’
  • Said it ‘tickles’ people to ‘hear her comment’ on the sat nav while driving

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Who is the only one who can tell the Queen what to do? The woman under the hood of course!

That’s the monarch’s nickname for her satellite navigation system, the Daily mail can reveal, demonstrating the 96-year-old’s legendary sharp wit.

According to sources, there is no need for a ‘satnav’ system in the official state of Bentley of the sovereign.

But while she knows the layout of her Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral estates like the back of her hand, a navigation system is still useful to the head of state, whether driving in person or with a driver.

And while she famously hates backseat drivers – ‘the Queen won’t tolerate anyone lecturing her while driving, even her late husband couldn’t tell her what to do,’ says one who knows her well – she finds the female voice of her GPS rather funny.

The 96-year-old queen has nicknamed her satellite navigation system 'the woman under the hood', Daily Mail can reveal

The 96-year-old queen has nicknamed her satellite navigation system ‘the woman under the hood’, Daily Mail can reveal

“A few years ago she started calling her ‘the woman under the hood’. It was very funny.

‘Of course she knows very well where the voice comes from. But Her Majesty is very sharp.

“She has a brilliant sense of humor and a very quick wit,” said the source.

“It’s always itching to hear her say ‘it’s that woman under the hood again’ when she hears her voice.”

And while she hates backseat drivers, she finds her GPS's female voice rather funny, sources have revealed.

And while she hates backseat drivers, she finds her GPS's female voice rather funny, sources have revealed.

And while she hates backseat drivers, she finds her GPS’s female voice rather funny, sources have revealed.

It is possible to adjust the voiceovers of navigation systems, but most come standard with a woman.

Historically, women’s voices have been used in navigation equipment dating back to World War II, when women tended to be radio operators.

The monarch uses a fleet of private cars including Range Rovers, Land Rovers and Jaguars and until recently always preferred to drive themselves if possible.

She is the only one in the country who does not need a valid driver’s license.

But she more than proved her mettle behind the wheel by working as a mechanic and driver in the Women’s Auxiliary Territorial Service during World War II.

The monarch uses a fleet of private cars including Range Rovers, Land Rovers and Jaguars and until recently always preferred to drive themselves if possible

The monarch uses a fleet of private cars including Range Rovers, Land Rovers and Jaguars and until recently always preferred to drive themselves if possible

The monarch uses a fleet of private cars including Range Rovers, Land Rovers and Jaguars and until recently always preferred to drive themselves if possible

A funny story about the Queen’s driving was revealed by British diplomat Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles, a former ambassador to Saudi Arabia, around the time the late King Abdullah – then Crown Prince – came to visit her in Balmoral in 1998.

After lunch, she asked her guest if he would like a tour of her Scottish estate, but he was visibly shocked when he got into the Land Rover parked outside the castle to watch his host drive.

The Queen turned on the ignition and drove off – an even more surprising move, given that women were not allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia at the time.

“Abdullah was not used to being ruled by a woman, let alone a queen,” the diplomat later recalled, after hearing the story as ambassador to Saudi Arabia by both the monarch and her guest.

The devilish attitude of the Queen at the wheel as she talked to the Prince would have made him quite nervous.

Sir Sherard wrote: ‘Through his interpreter, the Crown Prince begged the Queen to slow down and concentrate on the road.’

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