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Qantas will retire its fleet of 747s six months ahead of schedule due to the COVID-19 crisis

Qantas Advances Its Last 747 Flight by Six Months Due to the COVID-19 Crisis – Finally, Iconic Jumbos Are Phased Out After Taking Aussies to Heaven Since 1971

  • Qantas has brought their fleet’s retirement date forward from 747s to July 22
  • Long-haul aircraft have served the airline for nearly 50 years since 1971
  • Qantas believes that the massive planes are not financially viable because of the pandemic
  • Before the fleet officially retires, a series of final ‘joy flights’ are held

Qantas has released the latest flight data for its beloved fleet of 747 jets after nearly 50 years of service with the airline.

The plane originally planned to retire its fleet of Boeing 747s by the end of 2020, but the corona virus pandemic pushed the plans forward by six months.

Also known as the Queens of the Skies, the 747s will be flown to an aviation graveyard in California’s Mojave Desert on July 22 for the last time.

Boeing 747s are known for their ability to carry up to 364 people on long-haul flights.

But Qantas thinks it will be too inefficient to continue using the large aircraft in the coronavirus-ridden travel industry.

Qantas has pushed forward the retirement date of its fleet of Boeing 747s with its last flight to an airplane graveyard in California's Mojave Desert, scheduled for July 22. Depicted is 747 in 1982

Qantas has pushed forward the retirement date of its fleet of Boeing 747s with its last flight to an airplane graveyard in California’s Mojave Desert, scheduled for July 22. Depicted is 747 in 1982

Before the last flight, Qantas will hold a series of ‘joy flights’ to celebrate the aircraft that has served in its fleet since 1971.

The special domestic flights depart from Sydney, Canberra and Brisbane, the company said The Australian.

Details for the special flights will be announced next week, and Qantas said that all profits from the last flights will be donated to charity.

The Boeing 747 has a strong history with Qantas, which has used almost every version of the aircraft since it placed an order for the first in 1967.

Boeing 747s are known for their ability to carry up to 364 people on long haul flights, but Qantas believes it will be too inefficient to continue using the aircraft in the coronavirus-ridden travel industry

Boeing 747s are known for their ability to carry up to 364 people on long haul flights, but Qantas believes it will be too inefficient to continue using the aircraft in the coronavirus-ridden travel industry

Boeing 747s are known for their ability to carry up to 364 people on long haul flights, but Qantas believes it will be too inefficient to continue using the aircraft in the coronavirus-ridden travel industry

In 1971 the original 747-400 was fully in use in Australia and was soon followed by the first double deck version of the 747-300, the 747-400 and the longer range version.

Qantas has used 65 different versions of the iconic plane in its history, but it has now been replaced by more efficient and compact planes.

Last month, the airline had to cut 6,000 jobs – 20 percent of its workforce – because its internal borders remain closed with no end in sight.

Alan Joyce, CEO of Qantas, also said that the 15,000 employees who have already stepped down will “be out of work for some time.”

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