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Qantas sells old drink trolleys from its iconic Boeing 747 plane

Qantas now sells its old drink trolleys filled to the brim with mini bottles of red and white wine, champagne and snacks.

The vintage bar carts were removed from the airline’s iconic Boeing 747 airliner after operating for nearly 50 years before retiring in July.

The sale comes after Qantas revealed plans to cut further costs, including ending its 30-year partnership with Rugby Australia, in an effort to reclaim lost profits during the coronavirus pandemic.

On Wednesday, the airline opened its memorabilia storage shed to the public, with 1,000 Qantas 747 bar carts for sale starting at $ 947.70 each.

Each beloved cart comes complete with 40 mini bottles of red wine, 40 mini bottles of white and a bottle of champagne from the airline’s business class basement, Tim Tams, pajamas and a Qantas premium Sheridan blanket.

Within hours of the sale going live, all 1,000 beverage trucks were completely sold out after nostalgic flyers wanted a slice of aviation history.

Qantas now sells its old drink trolleys filled to the brim with mini bottles of red and white wine, champagne and snacks

Qantas now sells its old drink trolleys filled to the brim with mini bottles of red and white wine, champagne and snacks

Within hours of the sale going live, all 1,000 drink carts were completely sold out after nostalgic flyers wanted a slice of aviation history

Within hours of the sale going live, all 1,000 drink carts were completely sold out after nostalgic flyers wanted a slice of aviation history

Within hours of the sale going live, all 1,000 drink carts were completely sold out after nostalgic flyers wanted a slice of aviation history

Qantas executive manager of product and service Phil Capps said the airline wanted to provide a unique opportunity for aviation enthusiasts to own some of the 747 legacy, especially at a time when travel was out of reach for many.

“These beloved carts served Qantas and our customers well on their world trips from London and Los Angeles to Singapore and Santiago, averaging around 2,000 flights each,” he said.

Although we can’t use them anymore, they still have life in them, especially for those with an appreciation for aviation collectibles and an eye for design.

“There is a huge demand for Qantas 747 memorabilia and Frequent Flyers have shown great interest in converting the custom onboard trolley into everything from lamp stands to storage units.

“The fact that they are fully stocked with some of the most popular service items onboard Qantas will hopefully provide high-flying fun at home.”

Mr Capps said customers have ordered the airline’s wine to enjoy at home, while the ‘iso care kits’ with pajamas sold out within hours.

The half-bar carts sold for $ 974.70 each, including delivery, while the full-size carts with double the number of items were available for $ 1,474.70.

Each beloved cart comes complete with 40 mini bottles of red wine, 40 mini bottles of white and a bottle of champagne from the airline's business class basement, Tim Tams, pajamas and a Qantas premium Sheridan blanket

Each beloved cart comes complete with 40 mini bottles of red wine, 40 mini bottles of white and a bottle of champagne from the airline's business class basement, Tim Tams, pajamas and a Qantas premium Sheridan blanket

Each beloved cart comes complete with 40 mini bottles of red wine, 40 mini bottles of white and a bottle of champagne from the airline’s business class basement, Tim Tams, pajamas and a Qantas premium Sheridan blanket

The airline operated several incarnations of the 747 ‘Queen of the Skies’ for nearly 50 years before discontinuing the jumbo jet six months earlier as part of its response to the COVID-19 crisis.

The farewell to the last Qantas 747 in July inspired an outpouring of affection and nostalgia among Australians.

Meanwhile, Qantas has grounded most of its fleet due to travel restrictions and recently suffered an annual loss of $ 1.9 billion for the 2019/2020 fiscal year.

Up to 20,000 employees have resigned and 8,000 have been made redundant.

On Wednesday, the airline announced that it will end its 30-year partnership with the Wallabies at the end of this year.

“ In an environment where thousands of our people have lost their jobs and thousands of others have resigned while waiting for the flight to resume, we cannot maintain this sponsorship as we have in the past, ” said Stephanie Tully, chief customer officer from Qantas. .

While we are dealing with this crisis and its aftermath, the out-of-pocket cost of our sponsorship should be zero. Without exception, our partners have had an incredible understanding of the situation, especially as most face their own COVID challenges.

“Qantas has a very long association with Rugby Australia and the Wallabies, and we have stayed together through difficult times. Sadly, this pandemic has reversed it. Like all Australians, we will continue to encourage them from the sidelines. ‘

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