Pupils from the poorest families TWO times more likely to enter Oxbridge when they go to primary school

Pupils from the poorest families are twice as many in Oxbridge when they go to primary school, report

  • The 163 grammar of England sends more immigrant children to Oxbridge than all non-selective schools combined
  • Former senior officer Iain Mansfield collected data on grammar schools
  • Reports come in the middle of the left campaign to expand grammar schools

Eleanor Harding Education Editor for The Daily Mail

Grammar schools are not full of rich children – almost half of the students come from homes with below-average income, according to a report that explodes left-wing myths.

Former top official Iain Mansfield collected data showing how grammar schools benefit underprivileged children and how they gain access to the best universities.

They are especially helpful in helping children of ethnic minorities, with the 163 grammar of England sending more to Cambridge than all 1,849 non-selective schools combined.

The report, published today by the Institute of Higher Education (HEPI), comes in the middle of a fiercely lit left campaign to counter the expansion of grammatical schools. Under the leadership of the late Tony Benn's daughter Melissa, campaigners accuse the schools of being elitist and "no significant positive effect on social mobility." to have.

Pupils from the poorest families are twice as likely to enter Oxbridge when they go to primary school, have found a report (photo: Oxford University)

But Mr. Mansfield, who until recently worked for the Department of Education, said the allegations were based on a narrow focus & # 39; and added: "The claim that they are for the rich is simply not true. My report shows that selective education for many underprivileged children makes an essential contribution to social mobility. & # 39;

Most grammar's have been abolished and many of the remains have been bundled around the few local authorities that retain the old 11-plus system, such as Kent.

Of all grammar schools, the report shows that 45 percent of pupils come from households with a under-median income.

The report also shows that living in an area that retains the old 11-plus system improves the chances of each student at a top university. It turned out that 39 percent of pupils in selective school areas from state schools went to very selective universities, compared with just 23 percent in large areas.

And a state school pupil from the most disadvantaged fifth of the population is more than twice as likely to evolve to Oxbridge if they live in a selective area. An immigrant state school pupil is more than five times as likely to enter Oxbridge if they live in a selective area.

They are especially helpful in helping children of ethnic minorities, with England's 163 grammar sending more of them to Cambridge (photo) than all 1,849 non-selective schools combined

They are especially helpful in helping children of ethnic minorities, with England's 163 grammar sending more of them to Cambridge (photo) than all 1,849 non-selective schools combined

They are particularly helpful in helping children of ethnic minorities, with England's 163 grammar sending more of them to Cambridge (photo) than all 1,849 non-selective schools combined

The analysis takes into account both the chances of children from different groups to go to primary school and how children perform. Anti-grammatical campaigners have previously stuck to the fact that only 2.5 percent of secondary school students are entitled to free school meals, compared with 13.2 percent in government-subsidized secondary schools.

But this degree of disadvantage obscures large differences within the remaining 85 percent of the population. The newspaper calls on the government to promise more money for grammar schools. Mr. Mansfield added: "Public opinion has long been a favorite of the expansion of high school.

The government must now speed up its expansion plans, including setting up branch sites in the most deprived areas, where this is supported by the relevant local government. & # 39;

Nick Hillman, HEPI Director, added: & # 39; The debate on grammatical schools has become very one-sided. But the full evidence is more nuanced and shows that some students benefit greatly from it. & # 39;

Last month, 16 grammars received a £ 50 million share to build new classrooms for up to 4,000 extra students to meet the parents' demands. The creation of new selective schools was declared unlawful by Labor in 1998.

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