Home Australia Property developer Brett Henson complains his life was ruined after drunkenly stealing a taxi.

Property developer Brett Henson complains his life was ruined after drunkenly stealing a taxi.

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Former Mirvac real estate executive Brett Henson (pictured) is free to get behind the wheel again after stealing a taxi and driving it drunk in a move that became the talk of the town.

A former high-flying real estate executive is free to get back behind the wheel after stealing a taxi and driving it drunk around town in a move that became the “talk of the town.”

Brett Henson had been trying to get into the silver taxi after a night of drinking at 9pm on November 4, 2022 when the door handle broke and he fell backwards.

The 44-year-old man claimed in court that the taxi driver, Sayeed Ali Khan, tried to “extort” him for the handle of the vehicle before being attacked by a group of five men.

He told the court that the men, who were all “much older” than him, told Mr Henson they were the “Muslim brotherhood”. Henson said he saw robbing the taxi as his “only option.”

Former Mirvac real estate executive Brett Henson (pictured) is free to get behind the wheel again after stealing a taxi and driving it drunk in a move that became the talk of the town.

However, Magistrate Gregory Moore rejected his claims and found him guilty of taking and driving a vehicle without the owner’s consent and drink-driving.

On Monday, he told Sydney’s Downing Center Local Court that Henson’s actions “cannot be excused” by his belief he was being persecuted.

The magistrate noted that Henson had been “unstable” in the lead-up to the offence, which he said was “far from trivial”.

“The use of the taxi was opportunistic and undoubtedly the consumption of alcohol played a role,” he said.

“A message needs to be sent to the offender and others that this behavior is unacceptable.”

The court was told Henson had previously struggled with an alcohol addiction which had been exacerbated by the stress of his job.

He was a senior capital transactions manager for property giant Mirvac at the time of the alleged offending, but his lawyer Paul McGirr said he had not worked for 20 months.

Brett Henson had been trying to get into the silver taxi after a night of drinking at 9pm on November 4, 2022 when the door handle broke and he fell backwards.

Brett Henson had been trying to get into the silver taxi after a night of drinking at 9pm on November 4, 2022 when the door handle broke and he fell backwards.

He said his client had been “very well respected” in the property industry before committing the offences, but “suddenly, he can’t get a job”.

“The difficulty he has found in looking for work is that when you Google his name… (taxi theft and drink driving) comes up,” Mr McGirr said.

“It’s the talk of the town.”

McGirr said his client had suffered extra-curial punishment due to media coverage of his drunken offences, but was trying to return to the property industry.

“He’s really had a tough time on this… and so has his family,” she said.

“This is something very isolated and unique for someone who’s never been on the radar before.”

Mr Moore agreed that the publicity and Henson’s prolonged driving suspension amounted to a penalty and said he was a person of good character who had good prospects for rehabilitation.

He convicted Henson of both offenses and fined him $3,500.

Brett Henson (pictured left) was found guilty of both offenses and fined $3,500. He has also been banned from driving for 15 months since his arrest in November 2022, meaning he will be able to drive again immediately.

Brett Henson (pictured left) was found guilty of both offenses and fined $3,500. He has also been banned from driving for 15 months since his arrest in November 2022, meaning he will be able to drive again immediately.

The former Mirvac executive was also disqualified from driving for 15 months from his arrest in November 2022, meaning he will be able to drive again immediately.

Outside court, McGirr reiterated that Henson had “acted under duress because he had been attacked.”

“In hindsight, he probably should have chosen a better option: run or try to get his cell phone out and call the police,” he said.

“But now he wants to put this behind him and get back to work.”

Henson has decided not to appeal the convictions or fines imposed on Monday.

“He just wants to get on with his life and hopefully not be on the news or in the newspaper again,” Mr McGirr explained.

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