Proof that those dietary rules for celebrities are so hard to swallow: Michelle Mone & # 039; s 29 secrets tested

There is no doubt about Michelle Mone's business knowledge. The 48-year-old Scottish entrepreneur was co-founder of a very successful lingerie company in 1996 and now has a peerage.

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There is no doubt about her successful weight loss after she lost the seventh in seven years, only 11 pounds in the past year, in preparation for her marriage to billionaire fiancée Doug Barrowman.

Last week, she shared her & # 39; 29 rule plan & # 39 ;, a series of dietary recommendations, in which she claimed: "Changes in this lifestyle means we will all live longer and healthier lives. . . diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's and body motor diseases (MS and Parkinson's) are all blocked and / or vice versa !!! "

Entrepreneur Michelle Mone, 48, lost six stones and 11 pounds in seven years as she prepared for her marriage to billionaire fiancée Doug Barrowman

Michelle is depicted at the Dorchester Hotel in London in 2003

Michelle is depicted at the Dorchester Hotel in London in 2003

Entrepreneur Michelle Mone, 48, lost six stones and 11 pounds in seven years as she prepared for her marriage to billionaire fiancée Doug Barrowman. (Right, Michelle now and, left, Michelle in 2003)

She described her healthy eating plan and said: "It is actually a limited pescetarian diet with lots of legumes and vegetables. Meat substitutes can be used to supplement meals. The key is to avoid sugar, starch and simple carbohydrates at all costs. & # 39;

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But her approach has been slammed by experts. Zoe Harcombe, a researcher on obesity and diet, says: "This diet is likely to be deficient in a number of nutrients, and after studying the evidence for a calorie deficit diet, I expect the weight to be regained.

With the help of NHS dietitian Catherine Collins, Zoe Harcombe and Ian Marber, an independent nutrition therapist who has worked in the field for over 20 years, we have reviewed Michelle & # 39; s tips to determine which one to swallow whole and which one to swallow. must be taken with a very large grain of salt.

RULE 1: NO MILK

Michelle says: "Skimmed milk – cow's milk is bad for you; lactose intolerance. Human intestines are not designed to process milk effectively. . . substitute for almond milk or soy milk or coconut milk. & # 39;

Experts say: "Lactose intolerance affects only about 5 percent of people of Northern European descent," says Zoe Harcombe. "Milk is too rich in many micronutrients, including vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus, so we can't avoid it if it's not necessary."

"People get confused about milk. It's not bad for you and not even rich in fat – whole milk is only 4.5 percent fat – while Cheddar is 30-40 percent, says Catherine Collins.

& # 39; And it provides useful amounts of calcium and protein. & # 39;

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VERDICT: Ignore advice unless you are really lactose intolerant.

RULE 2: NO YOGURT

Michelle says: "Natural yogurt – only small amounts; lactose problem and full of natural sugar. & # 39;

Experts say: As explained, lactose is generally not a & # 39; problem & # 39; and because it is full of natural sugar, Zoe Harcombe points out that natural yogurt & # 39; less than 5 percent carbohydrates & # 39; so there is less than a spoon in a separate jar. Catherine Collins adds: "Yogurts can contribute calcium to the diet and can even be tolerated by people who are lactose intolerant.

"That's because the bacterial cultures that made yogurt use part of the lactose – which is a sugar – for their own energy needs."

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Collins warns: "Extra creamy yogurt often has cream as a second ingredient and is therefore no better than a dessert and should be avoided by people who pay attention to weight."

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 3: NO EGGS

Michelle advised that women should avoid eggs, while experts said they should be on a diet

Michelle advised that women should avoid eggs, while experts said they should be on a diet

Michelle advised that women should avoid eggs, while experts said they should be on a diet

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Michelle says: & # 39; Eggs – avoid completely – cholesterol problems; animal protein. & # 39;

Experts say: & # 39; Until the 1980s, it was thought that cholesterol from food sources such as eggs would affect the amount of cholesterol in the blood – it is now known that this is not the case & # 39 ;, says Catherine Collins & # 39; source of proteins that, when trying to lose weight, can help maintain fullness levels – which can help reduce calories, but only if you only eat when you're hungry. & # 39;

Zoe Harcombe adds: "Michelle says & # 39; animal protein & # 39; as if it is a bad thing if the opposite is the case. Only animal protein is complete – meaning it contains all the essential amino acids and in the right amount. Essential in food means something that we must consume – the body does not make it. & # 39;

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 4: NO FATTED FAT CHEESE

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Michelle says: "Low-fat cheese – avoid completely, as an animal protein with similar properties to eggs and milk."

Experts say: As already noted, there is no problem with dairy products as long as you have no lactose intolerance, and cheese, such as yogurt and milk, is a good source of protein, calcium and other nutrients.

However, cheddar and many other hard cheeses contain much more fat than milk and other dairy products, and low-fat cheeses with less fat can be beneficial, ”says Catherine Collins. "They are also much nicer than before."

VERDICT: Ignore advice. If you are on a diet, low-fat cheese can be beneficial.

RULE 5: AVOID FRUIT JUICES

Michelle says: Juices – avoid fruit juices because they are full of sugar; if used, it must be freshly pressed and taken moderately. & # 39;

Experts say: "I agree," says Zoe Harcombe. "I would really only say:" Avoid fruit juices because they are full of sugar. "Complete stop."

If you want vitamin C, it is better to eat a whole orange instead of making it into a juice, or even to eat vitamin C-rich vegetables such as red peppers. However, juice can be useful for those whose fruit and vegetable intake is otherwise lacking, says Catherine Collins. "If you always miss your five-a-day goal, I would not recommend removing fruit juice either, but keep your intake at one glass of 150 ml per day."

VERDICT: Limit intake.

RULE 6: FRESH FRUIT IN MODERATION

Michelle said that fresh fruit should be eaten in moderation, while experts said that this should only be done if you try to cut calories
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Michelle said that fresh fruit should be eaten in moderation, while experts said that this should only be done if you try to cut calories

Michelle said that fresh fruit should be eaten in moderation, while experts said that this should only be done if you try to cut calories

Michelle says: "Fresh fruit – full of sugar so take in moderation"

Experts say: This splits the experts. Ian Marber disputes the idea that fruit & # 39; full of sugar & # 39; is and says it is & # 39; useless and misleading scaremongering when fruit can be a source of antioxidants, fibers, and minerals that can contribute to our five-a-day & # 39 ;. On the other hand, if you try to lose weight, the relatively high sugar content of some fruits may mean that you are better off if you get your antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and minerals instead.

VERDICT: follow if you try to cut calories.

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RULE 7: MANY VEG

Michelle says: "Fresh vegetables – eat as much as you want. . . complex carbohydrates are good for you and also produce enough protein to live on. & # 39;

Experts say: Although our experts think it is good to eat lots of vegetables and admit that they can be considered as complex carbohydrates, they disagree with Michelle's reasoning.

"Carbohydrates do not provide proteins. Carbohydrates provide carbohydrates; protein provides protein, & says Zoe Harcombe. And according to Ian Marber, while there is some protein in vegetables, you should eat a lot of it to get the protein you need to survive.

He adds: "Broccoli contains 3 g of protein per 100 g, so to get the 45 g of protein that a woman needs every day, you have to eat 1.5 kilos of it. That is just not practical. "Zoe says," Vegetables cannot compete with red meat or fatty fish for nutrient density. "

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VERDICT: Yes, eat vegetables abundantly, but do not trust them as a protein source.

RULE 8: AVERAGE AMOUNTS OF WHOLE BREAD

Wholemeal bread should be eaten in moderation, says Michelle. Experts agreed

Wholemeal bread should be eaten in moderation, says Michelle. Experts agreed

Wholemeal bread should be eaten in moderation, says Michelle. Experts agreed

Michelle says: & # 39; Wholemeal bread – eat in moderation. Avoid bread that is not whole grain. & # 39;

Experts say: "We should choose wholemeal bread wherever possible," says Ian Marber. "It contains more fiber than other types." Catherine Collins adds: "Often it's not the bread itself, it's the amount that's eaten and what people put on it, that's the problem. Instead of butter, if you want to exchange calories for a low-fat spread – or better another low-fat spread cheese. & # 39;

VERDICT: watch what you put on your bread – and the portion size.

RULE 9: FISH THREE TIMES ONLY PER WEEK

Michelle says: "Fish and seafood are good for a maximum of 3 servings per week! Avoid fish with a high mercury content – tuna, mackerel, halibut, swordfish. & # 39;

Experts say: "The warning for mercury is given to women who are or may become pregnant, plus mothers who are breastfeeding and children 12 and

younger, & # 39; says Zoe Harcombe. "I don't think fish intake should be limited because it is so nutritious. It is especially important for anyone who avoids meat, eggs and dairy products. "Guidelines suggest two servings of fatty fish per week.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 10: ANIMAL PROTEIN IS A NO-NO

Michelle says: "Lean meat – avoid meat because animal protein is bad for you; both white and red meat. Use protein substitutes such as chickpeas, quorn, tempeh, seitans, jack fruit, and eggplant. Obtain as much food as animal protein. & # 39;

Experts say: & # 39; Animal protein is superior to vegetable protein because of the amino acid profile and how easily the body can use it & # 39 ;, says Zoe Harcombe. "It is incorrect to say that you & # 39; eat as much nutrition & # 39; from other sources.

& Moreover, she does not seem to know any protein substitute such as Quorn – only 11 percent protein – from a legume, for example chickpeas – nine percent protein – or a fruit, for example eggplant – eggplant as we call it – a meager one percent protein. & # 39;

A chicken fillet contains approximately 31 percent protein and is a good source of selenium and B vitamins.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 11: A LOT OF OLIVE OIL

Michelle says: "Olive oil – very healthy; 3 tablespoons per day. "

Experts say: & # 39; Olive oil contains a large number of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory elements & # 39 ;, says Ian Marber, & # 39; but with regard to the content of omega-3 fatty acids, it is no different than the rapeseed that it is so against (see below). & # 39;

VERDICT: I agree.

RULE 12: NO OIL SOLD

Michelle says: & # 39; Rapeseed oil – bad for you; carcinogenic! "

Experts say: & # 39; Rapeseed oil producers may like proof of that claim & # 39 ;, says Zoe Harcombe. Ian Marber says: "Absolute tosh! There are indications that cooking with rapeseed oil at high temperatures for years may be a contributing factor for lung cancer, but that does not make it carcinogenic. It is a British crop rich in omega 3, we should support it. & # 39;

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 13: AVOID BAKED BEANS

Michelle says: & # 39; Baked beans – bad for you; full of sugar and salt; a simple carbohydrate that is starchy. Natural legumes (lentils. Legumes, garbanzo beans, etc.). & # 39;

Experts say: Mass. "Most of the sugar in canned baked beans comes from the concentrated tomato in the sauce," says Catherine Collins. "They are a source of protein, fiber and slow-release energy and count as one of your five-a-day."

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 14: MANY NUTS

Many nuts are good, says Michelle, while the experts say dieters should avoid this advice

Many nuts are good, says Michelle, while the experts say dieters should avoid this advice

Many nuts are good, says Michelle, while the experts say dieters should avoid this advice

Michelle says: "Natural nuts (Brazilian, almonds, etc.) are good."

Experts say: They are as far as they are a good combination of fat, proteins and carbohydrates, with various trace elements. But a high calorie content means, according to Zoe Harcombe, that nuts are best avoided by people trying to lose weight.

FARDICT: Ignore advice if you are on a diet.

RULE 15: AVOID PAST PULSES

Michelle says: "Canned pulses — fine, but I would avoid canned pulses and go for bags in bags."

Experts say: & # 39; Why? & # 39; Ian Marber asks. "Canned pulses are more convenient, easier for portion control and as long as they are in water with no added salt or sugar, there is no reason to avoid."

Cooking with dried is also time-consuming, but must be done thoroughly, as some beans can be toxic if not prepared properly.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 16: FRESH UNLIMITED TOMATOES

Michelle says: & # 39; Canned tomatoes – fine. Fresh are better because they are superfood and antioxidant. & # 39;

Experts say: "There is no such thing as superfood," says Ian Marber. & # 39; And lycopene, an antioxidant in tomatoes, is probably more biologically available (the proportion that has a beneficial effect on the body) in canned tomatoes than in fresh tomatoes. & # 39;

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 17: NO REFINED SWEETCORN

Michelle says: "Corn – avoid tins, go fresh."

Experts say: & # 39; Why? & # 39; Ian Marber asks. "As long as canned sweetcorn does not contain extra salt or sugar, it is fine." Research shows that canned corn contains the same amount of fiber as fresh, and may even contain more antioxidants due to the canning process.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 18: YES FOR TOMATO PUREE

Michelle says: "Tomato puree – great."

Experts say: "Fine, but it makes no sense to say that canned tomatoes are not good, but tomato puree is," says Ian Marber.

VERDICT: I agree.

RULE 19: HERBS ARE GOOD FOR YOU

Michelle says: "Spices – great."

Experts say: "Yes, who suggests that this is not the case?" Ian Marber asks.

VERDICT: I agree.

RULE 20: BORDER DRIED FRUIT INLET

Michelle says: "Dried fruit – in moderation, because of sugar."

Experts say: Zoe Harcombe agrees, but proposes to completely avoid dried fruit. "Have the whole fruit. You could eat a dozen dried apricots without hitting an eyelid. You could not easily eat 12 whole apricots. & # 39;

VERDICT: Yes, but avoid if you strive for weight loss.

RULE 21: RESTRICT PASTA AND RICE

Michelle says: "Pasta and rice – up to 3 servings per week with no one serving more than 40 g (whole-grain pasta and brown rice or wild rice)."

Experts say: Whole grain including pasta and rce are a source of fiber, says Catherine Collins.

VERDICT: Honestly, if you have starchy carbohydrates, stick to whole grain.

Rule 22: PORRIDGE IS GOOD

Michelle says: & # 39; Oatmeal porridge – fine, if it is natural and to which no sugar additives have been added. & # 39;

Experts say: & # 39; Oatmeal is by definition natural and without sugar & # 39 ;, says Ian Marber. "Making a distinction between them and other complex carbohydrates, such as whole-grain pasta and rice, makes no sense."

VERDICT: inconsistent.

RULE 23: DO NOT EAT CRANBERRIES

Michelle says: "Legumes – are fine, apart from cranberries (full of sugar)."

Experts say: Ian Marber says: "Legumes are fine, except the baked beans that she says are not good? And cranberries are not legumes and contain little sugar when berries go. & # 39;

VERDICT: Legumes are fine, cranberries are fine.

RULE 24: NO FRYERS

Michelle says: "Don't fry anything."

Experts say: Although our experts do not approve frying, they are not necessarily frying. & # 39; Most & # 39; new & # 39; recipes start with onions and garlic fried in olive oil, & # 39; says Zoe Harcombe. "I would not discourage this."

VERDICT: not clear.

RULE 25: NO BATTERY

Michelle says: "Mash nothing

Experts say: Why choose batter? Avoiding fried foods is wise advice for weight loss, but that includes advice not to coat everything in chocolate.

VERDICT: Good, if clear.

Rule 26: COOK ONLY WITH OLIVE OIL

Michelle says: "Only cook in olive oil; nothing else. & # 39;

Experts say: "I thought we couldn't fry?" Says Zoe Harcombe. & # 39; Olive oil is unstable at high temperatures, whereas butter is not & # 39 ;, Ian Marber notes.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 27: NO CREAM OR BUTTER

Michelle sayss: "Not in cooking."

Experts say: "A small amount of fat can make you feel fuller if you try to eat less," says Ian Marber. "At higher temperatures, butter is a better option than oil."

VERDICT: Cut cream as a diet, butter is OK in moderation.

RULE 28: VEGGIE STOCK ONLY

Michelle says: & # 39; Stocks – use vegetable broth; no meat

Experts say: Every broth can improve the taste, whether it is vegetables, meat or fish. The only thing you should pay attention to is the salt content.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

RULE 29: NO TINF OIL OR CLING FILM

Michelle says: "Don't cook with this."

Experts say: "Michelle may refer to the possibility that household foil and plastics have an estrogenic effect (where it affects hormone systems and stimulates fat deposits around the middle), but that is largely unproven," says Ian Marber. We could not find a health reason not to use aluminum foil.

VERDICT: Ignore advice.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) health (t) Weight loss

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