Professor who joked with Bret Stephens is a & # 39; bedbug & # 39; condemns the NYTimes columnist

The professor who Bret Stephens a & # 39; bedbug & # 39; condemns the New York Times columnist and jokes his decision to tweet his boss through a joke as an & # 39; abuse of his social station & # 39; and an & # 39; exercise in handling power & # 39 ;.

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Write a column in it squire, David Karpf, associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, explained the conflict between him and Stephens that took place on Twitter on Monday.

After he gave Stephens a & # 39; bedbug & # 39; mentioned in a tweet, Stephens sent him an email that clearly offended the name and the CC & # 39; d boss of Karpf on the email, of which Karpf says & # 39; clarifies the intention of the message & # 39 ;.

& # 39; He was trying to send a message that he is above me in the status hierarchy and that people like me are not supposed to write mean jokes about people like him online & # 39 ;, Karpf writes.

& # 39; It was an exercise in handling power – using the New York Times imprimatur to ward off speech he finds unpleasant. & # 39;

David Karpf is associate professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University

Columnist Bret Stephens

Columnist Bret Stephens

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Professor David Karpf (left) condemns New York Times columnist Bret Stephens (right) for his decision to CC his boss through a tweet where Karpf gives him a & # 39; bedbug & # 39; called

& # 39; The bedbugs are a metaphor, & # 39; Karpf said in his first tweet. & # 39; The bedbugs are Bret Stephens & # 39;

& # 39; The bedbugs are a metaphor, & # 39; Karpf said in his first tweet. & # 39; The bedbugs are Bret Stephens & # 39;

& # 39; The bedbugs are a metaphor, & # 39; Karpf said in his first tweet. & # 39; The bedbugs are Bret Stephens & # 39;

& # 39; The bedbugs are a metaphor, & # 39; read Karpf & # 39; s first tweet. & # 39; The bedbugs are Bret Stephens. & # 39;

He responded to another tweet that reads: & # 39; Breaking – There are bed bugs in the NYT newsroom. & # 39;

Karpf & # 39; s tweet initially received only nine likes and no retweets, noting that Stephens should have watched hard to find it on Twitter and should work even harder to offend such an innocent joke. & # 39;

In response, the columnist e-mailed the provost from Karpf and CC & # 39; d George Washington University.

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& # 39; I am often surprised at the things that supposedly decent people are willing to say about other people – people they have never met – on Twitter, & # 39; said Stephens in the email. & # 39; I think you have set a new standard.

& # 39; I would like to get a chance to come to my house, meet my wife and children, talk to us for a few minutes and then get a & # 39; to call bedbugs & # 39; for my face, & # 39; he continued.

& # 39; That would require some genuine courage and intellectual integrity on your part. I promise to be polite, whatever you have to say. You may feel better about yourself. & # 39;

Karpf posted that email on Twitter, which quickly went viral and became trending hashtags #Bretbug and #BedbugBret.

By Tuesday Stephens had landed on MSNBC to defend himself and Karpf published a column in Esquire that slammed the columnist.

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& # 39; Stephens, it seems, was offended by my lack of decorum online. He felt that I had broken an unwritten social contract – that I was rude by delivering an insult online that I would not bring to his face & # 39 ;, Karpf writes.

& # 39; Bret Stephens seems to think that his social status should stop him from criticizing people like me & he said. & # 39; I think the benefits of his social status go hand in hand with the insight that lesser-known people will say nasty things about him online. & # 39;

In response, the columnist mailed the provost from Karpf and CC & # 39; d GWU. & # 39; He tried to send a message that he is above me in the status hierarchy, & # 39; Karpf wrote

In response, the columnist mailed the provost from Karpf and CC & # 39; d GWU. & # 39; He tried to send a message that he is above me in the status hierarchy, & # 39; Karpf wrote

In response, the columnist mailed the provost from Karpf and CC & # 39; d GWU. & # 39; He tried to send a message that he is above me in the status hierarchy, & # 39; Karpf wrote

On Tuesday, Stephens appeared on MSNBC to defend his actions and equated the situation on Twitter with a totalitarian regime

On Tuesday, Stephens appeared on MSNBC to defend his actions and equated the situation on Twitter with a totalitarian regime

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On Tuesday, Stephens appeared on MSNBC to defend his actions and equated the situation on Twitter with a totalitarian regime

Karpf says the irony of the situation is that Stephens regularly writes columns about the culture of & # 39; & # 39; safe spaces & # 39; & # 39; on college campuses.

He even points to a column that Stephens once wrote entitled Free Speech and the Necessity of Discomfort.

& # 39; Discomfort for you, but not for me, it seems … & # 39 ;, Karpf writes.

He further said that he & # 39; has little to fear from Bret Stephens & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; Stephens reached out to me in the wrong belief that I would be ashamed. He held out his hand in the conviction that my university would punish me for provoking the anger of a writer in the New York Times.

& # 39; That's an abuse of his social station.

& # 39; My life goes on and so does his. He will have a new nickname that he doesn't care about; I have a number of new Twitter followers who will soon learn that I am less funny than they had hoped. & # 39;

Many users have destroyed Stephens and have asked him to delete his account on Twitter

Many users have destroyed Stephens and have asked him to delete his account on Twitter

Many users have destroyed Stephens and have asked him to delete his account on Twitter

Forrest Maltzman, the provost of GWU, made a statement on Twitter and invited the columnist to chat about & # 39; civil discourse in the digital age & # 39;

Forrest Maltzman, the provost of GWU, made a statement on Twitter and invited the columnist to chat about & # 39; civil discourse in the digital age & # 39;

Forrest Maltzman, the provost of GWU, made a statement on Twitter and invited the columnist to chat about & # 39; civil discourse in the digital age & # 39;

Stephens & # 39; at the latest MSNBC was another thing Karpf says & # 39; surprised & # 39 ;.

Stephens said Tuesday in the air: & # 39; There is a bad history of being called, analogous to insects, dating back to many totalitarian regimes in the past.

& # 39; I have been called worse, I have written this man a personal note and now it is available to the world. & # 39;

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Karpf mocked the idea that a Twitter account was equivalent to a totalitarian regime and called it a & # 39; remarkably long walk & # 39 ;.

Stephens also claimed that he had no plans for Karpf in & # 39; professional issues & # 39; and added that it was customary to tell someone's boss how they behave online.

But Forrest Maltzman, the provost of George Washington University, made a statement about it twitter Defend Karpf and invite the columnist to speak at the university about & # 39; civil discourse in the digital age & # 39 ;.

& # 39; As you know, Professor Karpf speaks for himself as an academic and does not accept any instructions from me, & # 39; Maltzman wrote. & # 39; His opinions are his. Our dedication to academic freedom and freedom of expression are an integral part of GW's mission. & # 39;

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