Professor who coined the term & netherlands neutrality & # 039; says that the US government UU should BREAK Facebook

The teacher who became famous for coining the phrase & # 39; net neutrality & # 39; think that the US government UU You need to break technological giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google. The founder and CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, is seen upstairs in Paris in May

The teacher who became famous for coining the phrase & # 39; net neutrality & # 39; think that the US government UU You need to break technological giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google.

Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University who specializes in antitrust matters, says that big technology companies have become too big and pose a threat to the future of American democracy.

"We live in the United States, which has a strong and proud tradition of dividing companies that are too big for inefficient reasons," Wu told The Verge.

"We need to reverse this idea that it's not an American tradition, we've divided dozens of companies."

The teacher who became famous for coining the phrase & # 39; net neutrality & # 39; think that the US government UU You need to break technological giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google. The founder and CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, is seen upstairs in Paris in May

The teacher who became famous for coining the phrase & # 39; net neutrality & # 39; think that the US government UU You need to break technological giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google. The founder and CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, is seen upstairs in Paris in May

Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University who specializes in antitrust issues, says that big technology companies have become too big and pose a threat to the future of American democracy.

Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University who specializes in antitrust issues, says that big technology companies have become too big and pose a threat to the future of American democracy.

Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University who specializes in antitrust issues, says that big technology companies have become too big and pose a threat to the future of American democracy.

Wu defends the division of technological giants in his new book, The Curse of Greatness: Antitrust in the New Golden Age.

He says that the US government UU He made a mistake when he did not intervene in the acquisition of two Facebook competitors: WhatsApp and Instagram.

Wu argues that Facebook was able to gain monopoly control over the social media market by buying two of its rivals.

Wu defends the division of technological giants in his new book, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Golden Age.

Wu defends the division of technological giants in his new book, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Golden Age.

Wu defends the division of technological giants in his new book, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Golden Age.

"I think that if you carefully analyze the acquisition of WhatsApp and Instagram, the argument that the effects of those acquisitions have been anticompetitive would be easy to prove for several reasons," Wu says.

He says that splitting Facebook is not as difficult as it seems.

& # 39; What would be the damage? You will have three competitors, "says Wu.

& # 39; It's not & # 39; Oh, my God, if you get rid of WhatsApp and Instagram, then everyone will come crashing down.

"It would be like" Well, now you have some companies that really try to offer you an alternative to Facebook ".

Wu's feelings seem to be a reflection of a growing backlash against technology companies that have accumulated considerable power and influence over public discourse.

Facebook and Twitter executives assured Congress on Wednesday that they are working aggressively to eradicate foreign attempts to sow discord in the United States, and pledged to better protect their social networks against manipulation during the mid-term elections of 2018 and beyond.

Facebook's No. 2 executive, Sheryl Sandberg, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testified before the Senate intelligence committee in the morning, but there was an empty chair for Google's parent company, Alphabet, which refused to send to its highest executive.

In the afternoon, Dorsey appeared before a panel of the House of Representatives only to address Republican concerns that Twitter is censoring conservatives. Dorsey denied that this is happening.

The hearings are held at a critical moment, just two months before the mid-term elections and as President Donald Trump has accused Twitter of being biased against the Republicans' views.

While the executives were speaking, the Justice Department announced that it would see if its companies are harming the competition and "intentionally stifling the free exchange of ideas on its platforms."

He says that the US government UU He made a mistake when he did not intervene in the Facebook acquisition of two competitors: WhatsApp and Instagram (whose logo is seen in the previous stock image)

He says that the US government UU He made a mistake when he did not intervene in the Facebook acquisition of two competitors: WhatsApp and Instagram (whose logo is seen in the previous stock image)

He says that the US government UU He made a mistake when he did not intervene in the Facebook acquisition of two competitors: WhatsApp and Instagram (whose logo is seen in the previous stock image)

Justice Department spokesman Devin O'Malley said Attorney General Jeff Sessions will meet with several attorneys general at the end of this month to discuss the department's concerns.

Thirteen Russians were formally indicted by Special Advisor Robert Mueller this year on charges of participating in a plan to disrupt the 2016 election by creating fake social media accounts that caused divisive problems.

Both Facebook and Twitter are using artificial intelligence and other increasingly sophisticated technology to combat manipulation.

Facebook goes after "lack of authenticity" or false accounts.

Twitter focuses on analyzing patterns of behavior to detect suspicious activities because Twitter technically allows "false" accounts.

The companies have made many policy changes and have caught and banned malicious accounts during the past year.

Even so, their business models – free services that depend on attracting as many users as possible for as long as possible and discovering as much about them as possible – remain the same, and that has posed challenges to eradicate who are inclined to mischief.

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