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The expert: Dr. Tasha Stanton is an associate professor of clinical neuroscience at the University of South Australia

& # 39; I am Stanton & # 39 ;: professor of neuroscience offers the PERFECT response to a mansplainer who told her to read her own scientific article to find out more about her field

  • Dr. Tasha Stanton is associate professor of clinical neuroscience at the University of South Australia
  • She spoke with a man during a recent Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference
  • The man told her to read what Stanton et al thought about pain & # 39; – and she told him that she is Stanton
  • Her story resonated with Twitter users and inspired others to share their own experiences with people
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A professor of neuroscience had the perfect answer for a stranger who tried to present her field to her.

Dr. Tasha Stanton, associate professor of clinical pain neuroscience at the University of South Australia, was at an Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference when a participant advised her unsolicited to read a certain academic article.

However, she had a surprise for him: she was the author of that newspaper.

The expert: Dr. Tasha Stanton is an associate professor of clinical neuroscience at the University of South Australia

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The expert: Dr. Tasha Stanton is an associate professor of clinical neuroscience at the University of South Australia

Yikes! She was at an Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference when the man told her to read what Stanton et al found about pain & # 39; - and she told him she is Stanton

Yikes! She was at an Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference when the man told her to read what Stanton et al found about pain & # 39; - and she told him she is Stanton

Yikes! She was at an Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference when the man told her to read what Stanton et al found about pain & # 39; – and she told him she is Stanton

Dr. Stanton shared the funny but annoying moment on Twitter.

& # 39; Friends at conferences – don't assume that the people you're talking to don't know anything. I was just told to read what Stanton et al found about pain, & she said.

& # 39; IK. Am. Stanton, & she added.

& # 39; To be clear: I would never expect people to know what I look like! The more hilarious part of this was that the earlier part of the conversation had a more condescending tone with recommendations of what I should read, which happened to be MY paper, & she went on.

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& # 39; I literally answered: & # 39; I'm Stanton & # 39 ;, kept serious eye contact and then smiled.

Reactie Response: Visibly shocked, uncomfortable silence, some tried to kick back and then we both laughed.

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Don't get me: she reminded him that he had to be careful that other people don't know things, especially during a conference

Don't get me: she reminded him that he had to be careful that other people don't know things, especially during a conference

Don't get me: she reminded him that he had to be careful that other people don't know things, especially during a conference

& # 39; I told him it was a huge compliment that he recommended my newspaper, that I am happy that he enjoyed it and found it useful … but that in the future he might want to be careful not to accept it that other people don't know doing things … especially when you are at a conference.

& # 39; We all make mistakes (I'm sure), but hopefully the message came across, & # 39; she concluded.

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Her story resonated with other Twitter users, who liked the tweet 134,000 times. It also inspired others to share their own experiences with residents.

Brown University professor Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve remembered that she was asked if she was a student or student.

When she said she was a professor, the man asked for her specialty and told him & # 39; courts, law, and sociology & # 39 ;.

& # 39; You really need the book & # 39; CrookCounty & # 39; reading, & # 39; he said.

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More where that came from: her story resonated with Twitter users and inspired others to share their own experiences with people

More where that came from: her story resonated with Twitter users and inspired others to share their own experiences with people

More where that came from: her story resonated with Twitter users and inspired others to share their own experiences with people

& # 39; I know. I wrote it, & # 39; she answered with a & # 39; Clair Huxtable can & # 39 ;.

Carolina Public Press, principal investigator reporter Kate Martin, wrote: & # 39; A man I met at a city council meeting asked me to open public files, using the example of a story I wrote about police surveillance with Stingrays. & # 39;

Dianna E. Anderson wrote that a man once sent her her own article and told her to read about the subject.

And a woman named Kenya Bradshaw agreed: & I was once told that I misinterpreted the author of the law. I asked, "Who do you think the intention knows best?" He said, "The author, duh." I then said that I have agreed since I wrote it.

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