Prison letters sent by the mother who killed FOUR babies to become Australia's worst female killer

Kathleen Folbigg (pictured), 51, is currently serving a 30-year prison sentence for the murder of her first child and the murder of her other three

There have been chilling prison letters revealed by a mother who killed her four babies.

Kathleen Folbigg, 51, is currently serving a 30-year prison sentence for the murder of her first child Caleb and the murder of her three children Patrick, Sarah and Laura in Singleton in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales between 1989 and 1999.

The children were nineteen days, eight months, ten months and nineteen months, respectively.

However, a series of letters that Folbigg wrote to a friend last year were read more like the reflections of a heartbroken mother than a cold-blooded serial killer.

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Kathleen Folbigg (pictured), 51, is currently serving a 30-year prison sentence for the murder of her first child and the murder of her other three

Kathleen Folbigg (pictured), 51, is currently serving a 30-year prison sentence for the murder of her first child and the murder of her other three

Caleb (pictured) was only nineteen days old when he died of homicide at the hands of his own mother.

Caleb (pictured) was only nineteen days old when he died of homicide at the hands of his own mother.

Patrick (pictured), Sarah and Laura had eight months, ten months and nineteen months, respectively

Patrick (pictured), Sarah and Laura had eight months, ten months and nineteen months, respectively

Caleb (left) was only nineteen when he died, while Patrick (right), Sarah and Laura were eight months, ten months and nineteen months, respectively.

In the photo: Laura Forbigg, one of the four children of Katherine Forbigg who supposedly died hand in hand between 1989 and 1999

In the photo: Laura Forbigg, one of the four children of Katherine Forbigg who supposedly died hand in hand between 1989 and 1999

In the photo: Laura Forbigg, one of the four children of Katherine Forbigg who supposedly died hand in hand between 1989 and 1999

& # 39; Tremor. It's so hard. So much pain, "he wrote about his home and his life before being condemned and imprisoned.

"I recognize my area of ‚Äč‚Äčorigin of the units so many years ago," he wrote to Tracy Chapman, a former schoolmate in Newcastle, after being taken to the crime scene on the way to Cessnock prison.

However, Folbigg, Australia's worst mass murderer, could have been unjustly convicted, according to a group of lawyers who requested a review of her case.

In 2003, a court heard that they had been killed by a mother who was forced to drown them in violent fits of rage.

Barrister Isabel Reed, one of several lawyers who has been working on a petition for the Folbigg case to be reviewed by the NSW justice system, insists there is not enough evidence to convincingly support the conviction.

However, a series of letters that Folbigg wrote to a friend last year after being transferred to Cessnock Prison (pictured), read more like the reflections of a bereaved mother than a cold-blooded serial killer.

However, a series of letters that Folbigg wrote to a friend last year after being transferred to Cessnock Prison (pictured), read more like the reflections of a bereaved mother than a cold-blooded serial killer.

However, a series of letters that Folbigg wrote to a friend last year after being transferred to Cessnock Prison (pictured), read more like the reflections of a bereaved mother than a cold-blooded serial killer.

& # 39; We do not want her released from prison. We just want an investigation to examine the evidence and consider: has there been a judicial error here? Mrs. Reed told the Sydney Morning Herald.

"I did not think that when we started this was a big question."

The forensic pathologist at Monash University, Stephen Cordner, who is also involved in the petition, agrees that "there are no pathological or medical grounds to conclude a homicide" in the case of the deceased children of Folbigg.

The courts previously heard that it was the "cessation of breathing" which led to the sudden and unexpected death of each child, although the autopsies did not shed conclusive light on any cause beyond that.

In addition, much of the evidence used in the trial was considered misleading.

A group of lawyers who believe that Folbigg may have been wrongly sentenced are appealing to NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman (pictured) to begin a formal investigation into his case.

A group of lawyers who believe that Folbigg may have been wrongly sentenced are appealing to NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman (pictured) to begin a formal investigation into his case.

A group of lawyers who believe that Folbigg may have been wrongly sentenced are appealing to NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman (pictured) to begin a formal investigation into his case.

Ms. Reed claims to have called the New South Wales Attorney General's office, Mark Speakman, every two weeks for the past two years, in an effort to get her to initiate a formal investigation into the Folbigg case, in vain.

And on Monday, August 13, the details of the case of the mother turned murderer will be uncovered in the ABC Story program in Australia.

"I do not know if public pressure is something that could help with a decision," said Ms. Reed. & # 39;[But] I hope he (Mark Speakman) looks and at least he can not sleep comfortably on Monday night.

Meanwhile, Katherine Folbigg is left with little more than the memories of her nostalgic unit from one cell to another, which she says ended abruptly when she had to connect with the gloomy, dark future she now had. "

Meanwhile, Katherine Folbigg is left with little more than the memories of her nostalgic unit from one cell to another, which she says ended abruptly when she had to connect with the gloomy, dark future she now had. "

Meanwhile, Katherine Folbigg is left with little more than the memories of her nostalgic unit from one cell to another, which she says ended abruptly when she had to connect with the gloomy, dark future she now had. "

Meanwhile, Katherine Folbigg is left with little more than the memories of her nostalgic impulse from one cell to another, which, according to her, ended abruptly when she had to connect with the gloomy and bleak future she now had.

"It was time to remind myself that I was a prisoner, not Kathleen driving a car," he wrote in his letters to Mrs. Chapman.

"One day I'll be that woman, someone, one more time. Until that trip sustains me, keep me in touch with what was and still can be. "

The case of Folbigg is being explored by the Australian story of ABC next Monday.

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