Prison authorities blamed the prison attack that nearly killed Tony Mokbel, who may sue for tabs

Drug lord Tony Mokbel is going to sue the prison after the bomb report blames the authorities for a brutal prison movement that made him fight for life

  • Drug King Tony Mokbel was seriously injured when he was stabbed in Barwon prison
  • An assessment showed that the authorities did not fully comply with Corrections Victoria's policies
  • Work is now underway on the implementation of all 16 independent assessment recommendations
  • The legal team of Mokbel has not ruled out legal actions against prison authorities
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An independent investigation revealed that the prison authorities did not adhere to the policy that led to the brutal prison attack on Tony Mokbel (photo) earlier this year

An independent investigation revealed that the prison authorities did not adhere to the policy that led to the brutal prison attack on Tony Mokbel (photo) earlier this year

Prison authorities have not adhered to the security evaluation policy in the run-up to the brutal prison sign that drug king Tony Mokbel was fighting for life, has found an independent assessment.

Former NSW Court of Appeal Judge David Ipp and former Queensland Corrective Services commissioner Dr. Mark Railings were furious with the Barwon Prison authorities in their assessment of the February 11 incident released Thursday.

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The legal team of Mokbel has not ruled out legal actions against prison authorities because of the attack by two prisoners in the maximum security prison southwest of Melbourne that caused him a brain injury.

& # 39; I would not exclude it, & # 39; told one of his senior lawyers The Herald Sun.

The independent assessment noted that Corrections Victoria staff did not fully comply with the required safety assessment policy.

The attack on Mokbel took place the day after media reports that a & # 39; jail big wig & # 39; had a racket racket run by Pacific Islander prisoners.

Although the Barwon prison staff recognized an immediate risk to Mokbel before the February 11 attack, the trial was not in order.

& # 39; The independent assessment showed that although the prison authorities immediately acknowledged that there was a potential risk to Mokbel, resulting in consultation with Mr. Mokbel and other individuals, the process of assessing the risk was relatively short and not fully complied with the Victoria policy corrections & # 39 ;, said the summary.

& # 39; The independent assessment also revealed that prison staff immediately took measures to prevent further damage to Mr. Mokbel and acted courageously to relocate his attackers.

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& # 39; After the stabbing took place, the prison staff acted according to the emergency management procedures and again, courageously, to disperse the prisoners without further unrest. & # 39;

The drug kingpin was flown to the hospital in a critical condition after the attack

The drug kingpin was flown to the hospital in a critical condition after the attack

The drug kingpin was flown to the hospital in a critical condition after the attack

Tony Mokbel (photo) spent weeks in the hospital after the attack on the Barwon prison

Tony Mokbel (photo) spent weeks in the hospital after the attack on the Barwon prison

Tony Mokbel (photo) spent weeks in the hospital after the attack on the Barwon prison

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The assessment provided 16 recommendations for corrections Victoria and the Victorian government.

He urged Victoria Corrections to improve his response to media reports, to streamline procedures for managing serious perpetrators and to improve the collection, analysis and use of intelligence to inform decision making.

Minister of Corrections Minister Ben Carroll has accepted all 16 recommendations and is already implementing them.

The full assessment has been made public as it contains information that may jeopardize prison security and intelligence gathering and harm the prosecution of the alleged attackers.

Mokbel, 53, suffered several stab wounds to his upper body with bleeding from his mouth, head and chest in the attack.

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He spent weeks in the hospital and underwent rehabilitation for injuries. Medical experts said it would have been fatal without prompt intervention.

Two men, both 21 years old, were guilty of deliberately causing serious injury in circumstances of severe violence and recklessly injuring Mokbel and another prisoner, who was also injured when he rushed to Mokbel & # 39; s help .

Mokbel, who was guilty of drug trafficking charges in 2012, has been in Barwon prison for at least 22 years.

The life and times of & # 39; Fat Tony & # 39 ;: who is former drug lord Tony Mokbel?

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From Daniel Piotrowski

& # 39; Thick & # 39; Tony Mokbel is a notorious Victorian gangster who is serving a 30-year prison sentence for finding a drug empire in Melbourne.

Mokbel, now 53, was once the Ferrari-driving & # 39; king & # 39; from the underworld of the city and the most wanted fugitive from Australia.

Before he was finally imprisoned for good, Mokbel's life of crime consisted of tons of amphetamine and a number of mean achievements.

An incident that stands out is that Mokbel is blown out of his amphetamine laboratory in Brunswick when it exploded in 1997.

But he is best known for making one of the country's great escapes from the long arms of the law in 2006.

Despite being in the midst of a cocaine trafficking process, Mokbel fled Melbourne, hid in a Bonnie Doon farm, drove through the country to Fremantle, Western Australia, and sailed from there to the sunny Mediterranean coast.

He continued to run his drug empire from Athens, Greece, while his syndicate reportedly traded more than 45 kilograms of MDMA and $ 4 million in speed over three years.

But it all ended in handcuffs and ridicule when the police finally caught him trying to disguise himself in a limp wig.

One of Victoria & # 39; s top police officers famously described the headpiece as a & # 39; shocker & # 39 ;.

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Mokbel was returned to Australia and in 2012 the Victorian Supreme Court sentenced him to 30 years in prison, with a 22-year non-suspended release.

Earlier this year, he was described in the media as a & # 39; highly respected figure & # 39; among his fellow prisoners in the Barwon prison.

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