Princess Charlene of Monaco debuts an MORE dramatically shaved haircut in South Africa

0

Princess Charlene of Monaco debuts even MORE dramatically shaved hair in new photos from her anti-poaching trip to South Africa – as ‘infection’ prevents her from traveling home to her family

  • Princess Charlene of Monaco visited South Africa on a conservation trip
  • The royal mum of two, 43, debuted a striking new shaved haircut
  • Charlene learned about the work being done by the Princess Charlene of Monaco Foundation South Africa to save rhinoceroses from extinction

Princess Charlene of Monaco debuted a dramatic new shaved haircut during her recent conservation trip to South Africa.

Prince Albert’s 43-year-old wife showcased the ‘French crop’ haircut – with a longer strip on top of the head and dramatically shaved back and sides – in snaps shared on her charity’s Instagram page.

She has not been publicly pictured with her husband since late January and is said to have traveled to South Africa in mid-March.

However, she did post a photo of the family together at Easter on April 2. It is unknown if they joined her in South Africa or if she returned to Monaco and flew back.

The royal, who is mother to six-year-old twins Jacques and Gabriella, first stepped out in December 2020 with a dramatic half-shaved head, but has since gone even shorter and bolder with the cut.

It is clear that Charlene will remain in South Africa after suffering an ENT (ear, nose and throat) infection “which prevents her from traveling”.

Bold: Princess Charlene of Monaco debuted a dramatic new shaved haircut during her recent conservation trip to South Africa. The photos were shared on her charity’s Instagram account

Passionate: Charlene, who grew up in South Africa and represented the country at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, traveled to Thanda Safari in KwaZulu-Natal to learn more about how the Princess Charlene of Monaco Foundation South Africa's rhinoceroses helps save

Passionate: Charlene, who grew up in South Africa and represented the country at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, traveled to Thanda Safari in KwaZulu-Natal to learn more about how the Princess Charlene of Monaco Foundation South Africa’s rhinoceroses helps save

'Emotional': The princess participated in conservation operations, including rhino tracking and tracking, deployment to the Anti-Poaching Unit, wildlife photography educational sessions and a White Rhino dart and dehorn exercise (pictured)

‘Emotional’: The princess participated in conservation operations, including rhino tracking and tracking, deployment to the Anti-Poaching Unit, wildlife photography educational sessions and a White Rhino dart and dehorn exercise (pictured)

The palace was forced to comment on the princess’s whereabouts ahead of the Monaco Grand Prix, which she should have attended in Albert. Instead, the prince was present with their children.

It appears Charlene has yet to return from South Africa as Albert stepped out without his wife on Monday to visit the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco with their twins.

Charlene, who grew up in South Africa and represented the country at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, traveled to Thanda Safari in KwaZulu-Natal to learn more about how the Princess Charlene of Monaco Foundation is helping South Africa save rhinoceroses from poachers.

The princess participated in conservation operations including rhino tracking and tracking, deployment to the Anti-Poaching Unit, wildlife photography educational sessions, and a white rhino removal and dehorning exercise.

New look: Charlene first stepped out with a dramatic half-shaved head in December 2020 (pictured)

She's gotten even shorter and bolder (above)

New Look: Charlene first stepped out with a dramatic half-shaved head in December 2020 (left), but has since gone even shorter and bolder with the cut, as seen on the right

Personal impact: Charlene said of the dehorning process (photo): 'The experience was very emotional.  I have experienced first hand the fear and suffering of the rhinoceroses when we have to dehorn them so that poachers don't slaughter them [for the ivory]'

Personal impact: Charlene said of the dehorning process (photo): ‘The experience was very emotional. I have experienced first hand the fear and suffering of the rhinoceroses when we have to dehorn them so that poachers don’t slaughter them [for the ivory]’

Making a difference: The princess wanted to know more about the work to save rhinos

Making a difference: The princess wanted to know more about the work to save rhinos

Photos of Princess Charlene with the animals and rangers were shared on Instagram.

“This whole experience moved me,” Charlene said. “I came into contact with wonderful people and spoke to the local trackers and anti-poachers who all have an incredible passion for protecting our rhinoceroses and the environment.”

She continued: ‘It filled me with immense joy to reconnect with the African people and spirit. I was fascinated to learn about the history and culture of the area.

“How fitting to rediscover my love for Africa in a place aptly named Thanda, which means ‘love’ in the Zulu language!”

In the field: Photos of Princess Charlene with the animals and rangers were shared online

In the field: Photos of Princess Charlene with the animals and rangers were shared online

Majestic: one of the rhinoceroses being followed by Charlene and the rangers in South Africa

Majestic: one of the rhinoceroses being followed by Charlene and the rangers in South Africa

Taking a stand: Charlene took part in a number of operations to help protect the rhinoceroses

Taking a stand: Charlene took part in a number of operations to help protect the rhinoceroses

The photos from Charlene’s expedition sparked reactions from confused fans who wondered why the rhinos had to be dehorned.

The royal explained: ‘The experience was very emotional. I have experienced first hand the fear and suffering of the rhinoceroses when we have to dehorn them so that poachers don’t slaughter them [for the ivory].

“I want to do everything I can to protect the rhinos, including raising money to protect them and educating my children and others about rhino conservation.”

The Princess Charlene of Monaco Foundation South Africa is working with the Thanda Foundation Trust to help protect the rhinoceroses.

Still works!  Her husband, Prince Albert, has continued public duties with their children, taking them to the Monaco Grand Prix last week and visiting the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco on Monday (pictured)

Still works! Her husband, Prince Albert, has continued public duties with their children, taking them to the Monaco Grand Prix last week and visiting the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco on Monday (pictured)

Advertisement

.