Prince William arrives in Bristol to launch the charity project Mental Health At Work

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, wore a navy blue outfit while attending the free online initiative of Heads Together and Mind, a mental health organization that aims to help employers and employees with resources to improve well-being.

Prince William continued his efforts to defend mental health awareness on a visit to Bristol on Tuesday.

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, wore a navy blue outfit as he watched a joint project of the mental health charities Heads Together, led by William and his wife Kate along with Duke and Duchess of Sussex, and Mind. .

Its goal is to help employers and employees by providing resources that can improve mental well-being in the workplace.

The goal is to change the way employers approach mental health in the workplace across the UK, after a major study revealed that 48 percent of workers have experienced a mental health problem in their work current.

William was seen arriving at The Engine Shed, where he stopped to chat with staff and volunteers.

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The Duke of Cambridge, 36, wore a navy blue outfit while attending the free online initiative of Heads Together and Mind, a mental health organization that aims to help employers and employees with resources to improve well-being.

The Duke of Cambridge, 36, wore a navy blue outfit while attending the free online initiative of Heads Together and Mind, a mental health organization that aims to help employers and employees with resources to improve well-being.

The Duke of Cambridge heads the mental health organization Heads Together with his wife Kate, his brother Prince Harry and his sister-in-law Meghan.

The Duke of Cambridge heads the mental health organization Heads Together with his wife Kate, his brother Prince Harry and his sister-in-law Meghan.

The Duke of Cambridge heads the mental health organization Heads Together with his wife Kate, his brother Prince Harry and his sister-in-law Meghan.

The three-year-old father cuts an intelligent figure in a navy blue suit and an impeccable white shirt, injecting a touch of color with his polka dot tie.

When he arrived in the rain, William did not seem to mind that he got a little wet when the lady greeted him under an umbrella.

William was later seen sitting next to Mind's Chief Executive, Paul Farmer, as they sat down to attend a seminar.

Later, the prince was photographed talking with Aida Cable, Director of Youth Programs at the Royal Foundation.

On Tuesday, Prince William, 36, arrived in Bristol to launch a new charity project on mental health at work, which aims to change the way employers approach mental health at work.

On Tuesday, Prince William, 36, arrived in Bristol to launch a new charity project on mental health at work, which aims to change the way employers approach mental health at work.

On Tuesday, Prince William, 36, arrived in Bristol to launch a new charity project on mental health at work, which aims to change the way employers approach mental health at work.

Prince William, Duke Of Cambridge and Chief Executive of Mind Paul Farmer launch the Mental Health At Work project at The Engine Shed in Bristol

Prince William, Duke Of Cambridge and Chief Executive of Mind Paul Farmer launch the Mental Health At Work project at The Engine Shed in Bristol

Prince William, Duke Of Cambridge and Chief Executive of Mind Paul Farmer launch the Mental Health At Work project at The Engine Shed in Bristol

The launch came after nearly half of UK workers admitted to having experienced a mental health problem in their current job, in a study by the charity Mind.

A survey of more than 44,000 employees showed that only half of the 48% who had experienced mental health problems had talked to their employer about it.

Mind said the findings suggest that one in four workers is struggling quietly with problems such as anxiety, moodiness and stress.

Mental Health at Work & # 39; gateway & # 39; It has been created by Mind with the support of the mental health campaign Heads Together, led by William, the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke of Sussex, and 11 other organizations.

William was seen arriving at The Engine Shed where he met with several people behind the project in Bristol on Tuesday

William was seen arriving at The Engine Shed where he met with several people behind the project in Bristol on Tuesday

William was seen arriving at The Engine Shed where he met with several people behind the project in Bristol on Tuesday

The project aims to change the way employers approach mental health in the workplace across the UK: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (R) and Aida Cable, director of Youth Programs at the Royal Foundation during the launch of "Mental Health At Work".

The project aims to change the way employers approach mental health in the workplace across the UK: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (R) and Aida Cable, director of Youth Programs at the Royal Foundation during the launch of "Mental Health At Work".

The project aims to change the way employers approach mental health at work across the UK: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (R) and Aida Cable, director of youth programs at the Royal Foundation during the launch of & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39;

An important study revealed that 48 percent of workers have experienced a mental health problem in their current job: William has arrived at the Engine Shed in Bristol

An important study revealed that 48 percent of workers have experienced a mental health problem in their current job: William has arrived at the Engine Shed in Bristol

An important study revealed that 48 percent of workers have experienced a mental health problem in their current job: William has arrived at the Engine Shed in Bristol

William will join the launch on Tuesday by Antonio Horta-Osorio, executive director of Lloyds Banking Group.

He said Lloyds would be making "substantial use" of the mental health portal at work, which he described as a "hugely impressive task."

He added: "Our experience shows us that, with the right support culture, employees can experience poor mental health at times, or live with a continuous mental health condition, and still be successful and thrive at work.

"We all have mental health, just as we all have physical health.

"As employers, we have a real opportunity to change the way we approach mental health, giving our people the support they need to thrive."

Arriving in the rain, William did not seem to mind getting a little wet when the woman greeted him under an umbrella while attending Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project.

Arriving in the rain, William did not seem to mind getting a little wet when the woman greeted him under an umbrella while attending Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project.

Arriving in the rain, William did not seem to mind getting a little wet when the woman greeted him under an umbrella while attending Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project.

The father of three children is an intelligent figure in a navy blue suit and a starched white shirt, injecting a touch of color with his polka dot tie. William saw the engine house in Bristol.

The father of three children is an intelligent figure in a navy blue suit and a starched white shirt, injecting a touch of color with his polka dot tie. William saw the engine house in Bristol.

The father of three children is an intelligent figure in a navy blue suit and a starched white shirt, injecting a touch of color with his polka dot tie. William saw the engine house in Bristol.

Last year's Thriving at Work report, commissioned by the government, showed that up to 300,000 people lose their jobs each year due to a mental health problem and that poor mental health at work costs the UK economy between £ 72 trillion and £ 99 trillion.

Previous research by Mind revealed that one in three employers did not know where to seek guidance on mental health problems.

Mind executive director Paul Farmer said: "We know that employers want to do more and are starting to see mental health as a priority, but often they do not know where to start." The new online portal for mental health at work will change that.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (L) at the launch of "Mental health at work" at The Engine Shed on September 11

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (L) at the launch of "Mental health at work" at The Engine Shed on September 11

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (L) at the launch of & # 39; Mental Health At Work & # 39; in The Engine Shed on September 11

Last year's report commissioned by the government Thriving at Work showed that up to 300,000 people lose their jobs each year due to a mental health problem, and that poor mental health at work costs the UK economy between £ 72,000 millions and £ 99,000 million.

Last year's report commissioned by the government Thriving at Work showed that up to 300,000 people lose their jobs each year due to a mental health problem, and that poor mental health at work costs the UK economy between £ 72,000 millions and £ 99,000 million.

Last year's report commissioned by the government Thriving at Work showed that up to 300,000 people lose their jobs each year due to a mental health problem, and that poor mental health at work costs the UK economy between £ 72,000 millions and £ 99,000 million.

ince William, Duke of Cambridge during the launch of "Mental Health At Work" at The Engine Shed on September 11

ince William, Duke of Cambridge during the launch of "Mental Health At Work" at The Engine Shed on September 11

Ince William, Duke of Cambridge during the launch of & # 39; Mental Health At Work & # 39; in The Engine Shed on September 11

"In recent years, employers have begun to take staff welfare more seriously and we know that many are doing a great job on mental health in the workplace, now it's time for a radical change in the workplace. How we think about mental health at work All employers should focus and support their staff.

"Our research shows that when employers support their managers properly, it can make a big difference for the entire organization." The gateway gives managers the tools they need.

"Even small changes in the politics, approach and culture of the workplace can make a big difference in the mental health of those around us.

"No matter the size of your workplace, and no matter where you work, Mental Health at Work can help you find what you need to start or continue your journey to better workplace well-being for all."

The Duke of Cambridge, with the CEO of Mind Paul Farmer, while visiting Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project, a new workplace wellness initiative designed to provide employers with tools to help staff

The Duke of Cambridge, with the CEO of Mind Paul Farmer, while visiting Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project, a new workplace wellness initiative designed to provide employers with tools to help staff

The Duke of Cambridge, with the CEO of Mind Paul Farmer, while visiting Engine Shed in Bristol to launch the Mental Health at Work project, a new workplace wellness initiative designed to provide employers with tools to help staff

The Duke of Cambridge seen in the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39 ;: a new initiative of Heads Together and the mental health charity Mind

The Duke of Cambridge seen in the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39 ;: a new initiative of Heads Together and the mental health charity Mind

The Duke of Cambridge seen in the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39 ;: a new initiative of Heads Together and the mental health charity Mind

The Duke of Cambridge seen at the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39; - a new initiative by Heads Together and the mental health organization Mind- meeting of group members

The Duke of Cambridge seen at the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39; - a new initiative by Heads Together and the mental health organization Mind- meeting of group members

The Duke of Cambridge seen at the launch of the & # 39; Mental health at work & # 39; – a new initiative by Heads Together and the mental health organization Mind- meeting of group members

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