Prince of Wales is beaten over & # 39; American & # 39; spelling in a sincere letter to the French president

The Prince of Wales came under fire online because of his American spelling in a sincere letter written to the French president after the fire of Notre Dame.

On Tuesday, a letter of sympathy was written by Prince Charles, 70, to Emmanuel Macron, 41, in the wake of the cathedral fire on Monday, shared with the Clarence House Instagram account.

Despite the moving message, many of the Prince's 714,000 followers took up the post to stop Americanized spelling.

Arguing that the future British king should adhere to the Anglo-English spelling, fans pointed out that the words & # 39; torment, realize and civilize & # 39; all are spelled as & # 39; harassing, realistic and civilized & # 39; – using the American spellings.

The Prince of Wales, seen with Camilla, came under fire online due to his American spelling written in a sincere letter to the French president after the fire in Notre Dame

The Prince of Wales, seen with Camilla, came under fire online due to his American spelling written in a sincere letter to the French president after the fire in Notre Dame

The full letter reads: & # 39; My wife and I were completely sad to hear of the terrible fire in Notre Dame Cathedral tonight and wanted to let you know immediately how much we thought of yourself and the French at this most painful moment and of the emergency services that bravely fight the fire.

& # 39; I am well aware of what a truly special meaning the cathedral has in the heart of your nation; but also for all of us outside of France, it represents one of the greatest architectural achievements of Western civilization.

& # 39; It is a treasure for all of humanity to witness as a witness that its destruction in its most terrible sea of ​​fire is a terrible tragedy, the unbearable pain of which we all share.

& # 39; Cher Monsieur le President, our hearts go out to you and the French people more than you will ever know, especially in view of our experience with the devastating fire at Windsor Castle twenty-seven years ago.

& # 39; We send you our deepest sympathy, however insufficient it may be. & # 39;

On Tuesday, a letter of sympathy was written by Prince Charles, 70, to Emmanuel Macron, 41, in the wake of the cathedral fire on Monday, shared with the Clarence House Instagram account

Despite the moving message, many of the Prince's 714,000 followers took up the post to stop Americanized spelling

Despite the moving message, many of the Prince's 714,000 followers took up the post to stop Americanized spelling

Despite the moving message, many of the Prince's 714,000 followers took up the post to stop Americanized spelling

And users quickly hit the post, with a follower writing: & wait what? A Brit uses & # 39; realizes & # 39; not himself? Are you an American or the future king? & # 39 ;.

Another addition: & # 39; Agonizing with a z – that does not do & # 39; while someone wrote: & # 39; Ask your secretary not to write American English! & # 39 ;.

Elsewhere, a follower suggested: & # 39; What hope is there for our school children when even the HRH starts to spell & # 39; realize & # 39; with an & # 39; z & # 39;? & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Realize! Don't realize. But I do not criticize the sentiment of the letter, for clarity, & another man wrote.

And with a blow to the American spell checker, one of the followers said: & Frankly, Clarence House solves your spell checker. Why do we shun the English of the Queen for Americanisms? & # 39;

Users quickly hit the post, with a follower writing: & wait what? A Brit uses & # 39; realizes & # 39; not himself? Are you an American or the future king? & # 39;

Users quickly hit the post, with a follower writing: & wait what? A Brit uses & # 39; realizes & # 39; not himself? Are you an American or the future king? & # 39;

Users quickly hit the post, with a follower writing: & wait what? A Brit uses & # 39; realizes & # 39; not himself? Are you an American or the future king? & # 39;

Quarrel with the royal family should be an example, another said: & # 39; Realize * don't realize (we are not American) … HRH would be in favor of grammar and accurate spelling! & # 39 ;.

A fan even joked that Charles dictated the letter, and the American Meghan had typed it.

But many others defended the letter and argued that the spelling was irrelevant in the light of the tragedy.

& # 39; Beautifully said, but I am sorry to have seen so much criticism here. Have a heart, people! & # 39; said one.

Another argued that the post was aimed at an international audience and added: & Let's not be small and argue about regional differences. We all speak English. & # 39;

In the meantime, someone said: & # 39; The world has just lost an iconic historic building in tragic circumstances that was originally built in 1161 and took centuries to complete. It had over a million visitors annually, it housed invaluable treasures and the only thing you can complain about is the spelling of a spell checker? & # 39 ;.

But many others defended the letter and argued that the spelling was irrelevant in the light of the tragedy

But many others defended the letter and argued that the spelling was irrelevant in the light of the tragedy

But many others defended the letter and argued that the spelling was irrelevant in the light of the tragedy

FEMAIL has contacted Clarence House for comment.

In a speech to FEMAIL, the royal etiquette expert William Hanson said: & # 39; It's a shame that Clarence House accidentally accidentally released the US-English version of & # 39; realize & # 39; used.

& # 39; All communication aimed at the British public must be in British English. One of the softer roles that the monarchy must play is maintaining traditional norms.

& # 39; The British monarchy should correctly maintain British English – or, as it used to be called, English. But I wonder if Clarence House chose to use the more internationally recognized spelling deliberately because the message was intended for a global audience? Maybe we should give them the benefit of the doubt. & # 39;

This is after noble-eyed fans entered the SussexRoyal Instagram account and claimed that the Americanized spelling of her most recent post meant that California-born Meghan himself wrote the captions.

Meghan, 37, and Harry, 34, recently thanked fans for donating to their chosen charities in honor of Baby Sussex, and a message about Baby2Baby includes references to & # 39; cribs & # 39; and & # 39; diapers & # 39 ;.

Several messages use the American spelling & # 39; organization & # 39; instead of & # 39; organization & # 39; and & # 39; program & # 39; s & # 39; instead of & # 39; program & # 39; s & # 39 ;.

And fans have quickly found American characters, American dollar signs and American subtitles in the captions and claim these points for an American who wrote them.

Eagle-eyed fans took the SussexRoyal Instagram account Tuesday and claimed that the Americanized spelling of her most recent post meant that California-born Meghan was writing the captions herself

Eagle-eyed fans took the SussexRoyal Instagram account Tuesday and claimed that the Americanized spelling of her most recent post meant that California-born Meghan was writing the captions herself

Eagle-eyed fans took the SussexRoyal Instagram account Tuesday and claimed that the Americanized spelling of her most recent post meant that California-born Meghan was writing the captions herself

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