Prince Harry takes to the sea with Royal Marines and the South African police

Action man! Prince Harry goes on sea with Royal Marines and the South African police on patrol to tackle the illegal trade in wild animals

  • Harry hit the water with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit and Royal Marines
  • The Duke of Sussex took part in their patrols to tackle the illegal wildlife trade
  • They had planned to take Harry to Seal Island, but the sea was too rough
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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex today released exciting footage of Prince Harry hitting the water as he joined patrols to tackle the illegal wildlife trade.

Harry, who is captain-general of the Royal Marines, traveled on a rib with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit and members of the British Royal Marines, on the second day of his whirlwind tour through South Africa.

The Prince was shot down in Kalk Bay Harbor when he learned more about poaching the abalone snail, a delicacy in East Asia.

They were planning to take Harry to Seal Island, which, as the name suggests, is inhabited only by seals. But the sea was too rough so Harry made an exciting drive along the coast of Kalk Bay, south of Cape Town

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They were planning to take Harry to Seal Island, which, as the name suggests, is inhabited only by seals. But the sea was too rough so Harry made an exciting drive along the coast of Kalk Bay, south of Cape Town

The Duke of Sussex is Captain General of the Royal Marines

The Duke of Sussex is Captain General of the Royal Marines

Harry hit the water with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit and members of the British Royal Marines

Harry hit the water with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit and members of the British Royal Marines

The Duke of Sussex, Captain General of the Royal Marines, hits the water with the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit and members of the British Royal Marines

The Duke of Sussex travels on a RIB of the South African maritime police unit

The Duke of Sussex travels on a RIB of the South African maritime police unit

The Duke of Sussex travels on a RIB of the South African maritime police unit

Police unit trained to snare smugglers of snails that are worth more than gold

Abalone, a sea snail found off the coast of South Africa, is now at critically low levels due to over-exploitation and poaching.

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A TRAFFIC report states that an average of 2,000 tonnes of abalone is packed annually by poachers – 20 times the legal yield.

The species is especially appreciated in East Asia, where people are willing to pay hundreds of dollars per kilogram for the delicacy.

A plate of abalone in China can sell for £ 420, more expensive than the equivalent weight in gold.

According to a 2014 report, researchers found unbridled abalone poaching and a growing drug addict crisis in South African coastal communities where drugs are often traded for illegally harvested snails.

Source: Traffic

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The trip took place yesterday afternoon when Meghan returned to the High Commissioner's residence to see Archie.

Harry was then deported at sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit, which fights the illegal poaching of the abalone snail.

Upon arrival at the port of Kalk Bay, Harry was greeted by the British defense adviser, Colonel Alan Lister OBE of the Royal Marines.

Colonel Alan introduced the duke to two Royal Marine Trainers waiting in the Maritime Police Boat, Captain Robert Smith and Marine Timothy Lombard, who provided training for the Cape Town Maritime Police Unit (MPU).

The Marines visited for a week last August and are now back for another week this month.

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They were planning to take Harry to Seal Island, which, as the name suggests, is inhabited only by seals. But the sea was too rough so Harry made an exciting drive along the coast of Kalk Bay, south of Cape Town.

Captain Rob Smith, 27, from Chippenham in Wiltshire spoke to Harry.

Captain Smith, who spent four years as a marine, said: & # 39; We talked about what we did last year – we spent a week here in August 2018 to learn crafts, hand signals to communicate between the boats and develop tactics with the maritime police unit that will help them on the water to coordinate missions more effectively.

Harry was removed from the sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit to fight the illegal poaching of the abalone snail

Harry was removed from the sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit to fight the illegal poaching of the abalone snail

Harry was removed from the sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit to fight the illegal poaching of the abalone snail

Harry was removed from the sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit to fight the illegal poaching of the abalone snail

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Harry was removed from the sea by the Cape Town maritime police unit to fight the illegal poaching of the abalone snail

The abalone is a type of sea snail that is at critically low levels, because a plate of marine delicacy is worth more than its weight in gold - £ 420 per plate - for Chinese dinners

The abalone is a type of sea snail that is at critically low levels, because a plate of marine delicacy is worth more than its weight in gold - £ 420 per plate - for Chinese dinners

The abalone is a type of sea snail that is at critically low levels, because a plate of marine delicacy is worth more than its weight in gold – £ 420 per plate – for Chinese dinners

Harry on the rib RIB during a visit to Kalk Bay Harbor, in Cape Town on day two of the royal couple's visit to South Africa

Harry on the rib RIB during a visit to Kalk Bay Harbor, in Cape Town on day two of the royal couple's visit to South Africa

Harry on the rib RIB during a visit to Kalk Bay Harbor, in Cape Town on day two of the royal couple's visit to South Africa

Prince Harry poses for a photo with employees of the South African maritime police unit in the port of Kalk Bay

Prince Harry poses for a photo with employees of the South African maritime police unit in the port of Kalk Bay

Prince Harry poses for a photo with employees of the South African maritime police unit in the port of Kalk Bay

& # 39; It was very important to build their confidence with some mentoring. & # 39; Harry was very engaged and enjoyed talking to us.

& # 39; He wanted to get a better idea of ​​how poachers work and how advanced their operations are.

& # 39; They can operate every night and even now during the day, so the problem is pretty big.

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& # 39; When the abalone snail is exported to China, it retrieves a price that is comparable to gold. The maritime unit has 300 km of coastline for police with only 30 employees.

& # 39; Harry was very interested in environmental issues and how dedicated the maritime unit staff is to help.

& # 39; It was an authentic experience for Harry and it was a great pleasure and privilege to meet our Captain General. & # 39;

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