Home Australia Prince Harry could have exaggerated stories about his cocaine use to ‘sell books’, U.S. government lawyers claim in court as they argue his immigration records should be kept secret

Prince Harry could have exaggerated stories about his cocaine use to ‘sell books’, U.S. government lawyers claim in court as they argue his immigration records should be kept secret

by Elijah
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Prince Harry's confessions in his memoirs that he used drugs are not a

Prince Harry’s confessions in his memoirs that he used drugs are not “evidence” that he actually did them and could have been a ploy to “sell books,” the US government has argued in court.

The Biden administration’s claim came as a group of experts in Washington DC sought access to Harry’s visa application to see if he lied about drug use.

John Bardo of the Department of Homeland Security told the court that Harry’s book ‘Spare’ was not ‘sworn testimony or proof’ that he used drugs.

He said, “Just saying something in a book doesn’t make it true.”

Prince Harry’s confessions in his memoirs that he used drugs are not “proof” that he actually did and could have been a ploy to “sell books,” the US government has argued in court.

The lawyer added that people say things to “sell books,” as he argued that Harry’s immigration records should remain private.

It was the latest twist in a case in which the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington, D.C.-based think tank, is suing to force the release of the Duke of Sussex’s U.S. immigration files.

Last week, the Duke told Good Morning America: “American citizenship is a thought that has crossed my mind, but it is not something that is a high priority for me at the moment.”

John Bardo of the US Department of Homeland Security told the court that Harry's book 'Spare' was not 'sworn testimony or proof' that he used drugs.

John Bardo of the US Department of Homeland Security told the court that Harry's book 'Spare' was not 'sworn testimony or proof' that he used drugs.

John Bardo of the US Department of Homeland Security told the court that Harry’s book ‘Spare’ was not ‘sworn testimony or proof’ that he used drugs.

In federal court in Washington, D.C., Heritage lawyers also filed a transcript of the Feb. 16, 2024, GMA interview “in which the Duke of Sussex discusses the possibility of seeking U.S. citizenship.”

They said it added to their case seeking the release of their immigration records.

In a court filing, Heritage said: “Extensive and continuing media coverage has raised the question of whether DHS properly admitted the Duke of Sussex in light of the fact that he has publicly admitted the essential elements of a series of crimes related to drugs.”

U.S. District Court Judge Carl J. Nichols, sitting in Court 17 of the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., is expected to issue a ruling in the coming weeks.

Harry, who has lived in California since 2020, was not present in court.

When applying for a U.S. visa, foreign nationals are asked on the DHS visa form DH160: “Are you or have you ever been a drug addict or addict?”

They are also asked if they have ever “violated any laws related to controlled substances.”

If they answer “yes,” they may still receive an exemption.

Heritage wants to see if Harry admitted to taking illegal drugs before getting a visa.

They also want to establish whether he was granted an exemption and given any favorable treatment.

Sources close to the duke have previously indicated that he responded sincerely to the request.

Lawyers for the foundation maintain that the documents are of “immense public interest.”

The duke, 39, admitted to ‘Spare’ that he had used marijuana, cocaine and magic mushrooms.

Last week, the Duke told Good Morning America: “American citizenship is a thought that has crossed my mind, but it is not something that is a high priority for me at the moment.”

He wrote that “psychedelics did me some good” and also described experimenting with the hallucinogenic Amazonian plant ayahuasca.

Harry described it as “cleaning the windshield, removing the filters of life.”

Biden officials have fought the case brought by Heritage for months, arguing that all visa applicants have a right to privacy.

The foundation is seeking “all records from Prince Harry’s alien registration file.”

That includes “any application for immigration benefits” and “all records relating to any application for exemption by Prince Harry.”

In a court document, Heritage said: ‘[The case] arises mainly because SAR [His Royal Highness] voluntarily – and for immense benefit – admitted in writing to the elements any number of controlled substance violations. (In fact, some say SAR has gone so far as to brag and encourage illegal drug use.)

In federal court in Washington DC, Heritage lawyers also filed a transcript of GMA's February 16, 2024 interview in which the Duke of Sussex discusses the possibility of seeking US citizenship.

In federal court in Washington DC, Heritage lawyers also filed a transcript of GMA's February 16, 2024 interview in which the Duke of Sussex discusses the possibility of seeking US citizenship.

In federal court in Washington DC, Heritage lawyers also filed a transcript of GMA’s February 16, 2024 interview in which the Duke of Sussex discusses the possibility of seeking US citizenship.

“The Duke of Sussex did so despite it being widely known that such admissions can have adverse immigration consequences for non-citizens and despite employing prominent legal advisors on both sides of the Atlantic.”

DHS has previously publicly stated that foreign nationals who enter the country and admit to committing drug crimes may be “inadmissible.”

He rejected an earlier request from the Heritage Foundation in June to obtain Harry’s records.

In court papers, the department has argued that “mere acknowledgment of these records would constitute an unwarranted invasion of Prince Harry’s privacy.”

Harry and Megan attend the Invictus Winter Games in Vancouver last week

Harry and Megan attend the Invictus Winter Games in Vancouver last week

Harry and Megan attend the Invictus Winter Games in Vancouver last week

“The records are particularly sensitive because their release, even in part, would reveal Prince Harry’s status in the United States, which Prince Harry has not disclosed.”

He continued: ‘Specifically, the records would reveal the types of documents Prince Harry used to travel to the United States, his admission status, and any immigration or non-immigration benefits he may have sought.

“Courts consistently hold that a person’s visa or immigration status is private, personal information exempt from disclosure.”

Nile Gardiner, director of the Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom at the Heritage Foundation, said: “Given Harry’s numerous confessions of drug use, which typically disqualify him from entering the United States, Americans deserve to know whether Prince Harry lied. on your application and whether DHS looked the other way or gave you preferential treatment.’

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