Prince Harry Compares Covid Pandemic to HIV in People’s Vaccine Video

Prince Harry today compared the Covid-19 crisis to HIV, claiming in a YouTube video that ‘corporate greed and political failure have prolonged both pandemics’.

The Duke of Sussex told viewers today that there were “striking parallels between Covid-19 and another deadly pandemic, one that surfaced 40 years ago – HIV”.

The 37-year-old made the comments in a video featuring images of his late mother Princess Diana, who was known for raising awareness about HIV/AIDS.

The clip also featured Harry and his wife Meghan Markle at the Global Citizen Live event in New York in September, calling for a vaccine equality policy.

Today’s video appeared on World AIDS Day as part of the People’s Vaccine Alliance coalition of groups and activists campaigning for a ‘people’s vaccine’.

The alliance is supported by organizations such as UNAids – the United Nations’ Joint Program on HIV/AIDS – as well as Oxfam and Amnesty International.

Harry also wrote a letter to World Health Organization Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and UNAids Executive Director Winnie Byanyima saying how “deeply grateful” Diana would have been for their achievements.

Prince Harry at the Global Citizen Live event in New York City’s Central Park on September 25

Harry also wrote a letter to WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and UNAids chief Winnie Byanyima saying how

Harry also wrote a letter to WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and UNAids chief Winnie Byanyima saying how “deeply grateful” Diana would have been for their work.

Prince Harry said in today’s clip: ‘There are striking parallels between Covid-19 and another deadly pandemic, one that emerged 40 years ago – HIV.’

He added: “This is a story about how corporate greed and political failure have prolonged both pandemics, and what we can do to stop it.”

In full: Prince Harry’s letter calling for vaccine equality on World AIDS Day

dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and Mrs Winnie Byanyima,

On this World AIDS Day, we recognize the 40 years that have shaped the lives of many. We honor those whose lives were cut short and reaffirm our commitment to a scientific community that has worked tirelessly against this disease. My mother would be very grateful to you for all that you stand for and have achieved. We all share that gratitude, so thank you.

It is striking to see that the world’s leading AIDS activists are now also leading the call for equality in COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccinating the world is a test of our moral character and we are experiencing a spectacular failure when it comes to global vaccine equality. As with the AIDS crisis, we have again revealed in the past year that the value of life depends on whether you were born and/or live in a wealthy country or in a developing country.

We’ve known for some time (thanks to medical experts) that if we’re not able to meet the agreed targets of vaccinating 40% of each country’s population by the end of the year, and 70% by September next year, we may more dangerous COVID-19 variants are likely to emerge. Yet here we are.

While it is too early to know the full extent of the risk posed by the Omicron variant, which we only know thanks to the experts in Southern Africa who identified it, there is no doubt that its emergence is a major concern. Now more than ever, the voiceless majority of the world needs to be heard, and it’s up to our leaders to end this pandemic. Anything less is self-defeating.

That means breaking pharmaceutical monopolies that prevent emergency vaccines from reaching communities around the world; that means governments keep their promises and deliver the doses they committed; that means pursuing international pandemic agreements with strict timelines and holding each other accountable; that means that all human lives are treated as equal.

It is time to learn the lessons learned during the HIV/AIDS pandemic, where millions died needlessly due to deep inequalities in access to treatment. Are we really comfortable repeating the failures of the past? Everything I’ve learned from Sentebale’s youth tells me not. They see how repeating these mistakes is destructive and self-destructive, it is betrayal to the next generation. Let’s celebrate today and build on the work of champions who turned what was once a death sentence into a manageable state. Tomorrow, let’s continue our efforts to save lives and make a difference.

Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex

Founding patron, Sentebale

The Duke said: “In the early 2000s, a wave of activism helped break the monopolies of pharmaceutical companies, giving millions of people access to generic drugs at a fraction of the price.”

And he continued: “By ending vaccine monopolies and sharing technology, companies in developing countries can also start producing Covid vaccines.”

The video ended with Harry and Mrs. Byanyima saying, ‘Break the monopolies, share the know-how, deliver a vaccine for people.’

Harry also wrote a letter to the Director General of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and Ms. Byanyima, saying how “deeply grateful” Diana would have been for their achievements.

The letter was read by Dr. Meg Doherty, director of WHO’s global HIV, hepatitis and STI programs, at the WHO and UNAids event.

Harry wrote: ‘On this World AIDS Day we recognize the 40 years that have shaped the lives of many.

“We honor those whose lives were cut short and reaffirm our commitment to a scientific community that has worked tirelessly against this disease.

“My mother would be immensely grateful to you for all that you stand for and have accomplished. We all share that gratitude, so thank you.’

He said there had been a “spectacular failure” over shares of the coronavirus vaccine.

“Vaccinating the world is a test of our moral character and we are experiencing a spectacular failure when it comes to global vaccine equality,” Harry wrote.

‘As with the AIDS crisis, we made it clear again last year that the value of life depends on whether you were born and/or live in a rich country or in a developing country.’

Harry described the emergence of the Omicron variant as “deeply troubled.”

“More than ever, the voiceless majority of the world needs to be heard and it is up to our leaders to end this pandemic,” he wrote.

The duke warned that repeating the failures surrounding the AIDS pandemic would be a “betrayal to the next generation.”

He said: ‘It is time to learn lessons learned during the HIV/AIDS pandemic, where millions died needlessly as a result of deep inequalities in access to treatment.

Do we really feel comfortable repeating the failures of the past? Everything I’ve learned from Sentebale’s youth tells me not.

They see how repeating these mistakes is destructive and self-destructive, it is betrayal to the next generation.

“Let’s celebrate today and build on the work of champions who turned what was once a death sentence into a manageable state.

“Tomorrow, let’s continue our efforts to save lives and make a difference.”

In today’s video, Harry was filmed speaking in New York in September saying, “A lot of these vaccines are government funded, they’re your vaccines — you paid for them.”

The Duke had attended Global Citizen Live, an event that urged leaders to adopt a vaccine equality policy, at which point he called the pandemic a “human rights crisis.”

The late Princess Diana was known for raising awareness about HIV/AIDS.  She is pictured here meeting HIV/AIDS patients during the Turning Point project in London in 1992

The late Princess Diana was known for raising awareness about HIV/AIDS. She is pictured here meeting HIV/AIDS patients during the Turning Point project in London in 1992

Princess Diana shakes hands with HIV/AIDS patient William Drake in a London center in 1992

Princess Diana shakes hands with HIV/AIDS patient William Drake in a London center in 1992

Harry also said at the event, where he was joined by Meghan, that pharmaceutical companies should relinquish their intellectual property rights to Covid vaccines.

In a speech earlier that month, he blamed overwhelming “mass misinformation” for Covid vaccine reluctance and urged governments to address vaccine inequalities.

Harry, who praised the team behind the Oxford/AstraZeneca shot at the GQ Awards, spoke of a “huge disparity between who can and cannot access the vaccine”.

The Duke also said at the time that less than 2 percent of people in the developing world had received a shot and that many health workers had not been vaccinated.

And during Global Citizen VAX Live in May, he said, “This pandemic will not end unless we act collectively with an unprecedented commitment to our shared humanity.”

Harry and UNAIDS Executive Director Winnie Byanyima shared the story for today's video

Harry and UNAIDS Executive Director Winnie Byanyima shared the story for today’s video

At the GQ Awards in September, Harry blamed overwhelming 'mass misinformation' for Covid vaccine reluctance and urged governments to address vaccine disparities

At the GQ Awards in September, Harry blamed overwhelming ‘mass misinformation’ for Covid vaccine reluctance and urged governments to address vaccine disparities

Commenting on today’s video, Christine Stegling, executive director of the charity Frontline Aids, told MailOnline: “This isn’t the first time rich countries’ governments have solved a problem once it seems to be in someone else’s backyard.” located. .

“We saw it with AIDS, where the transformative impact of HIV treatments in rich countries has greatly reduced the urgency, focus and funding for the global response, and we’re starting to see the same with Covid-19. We cannot allow history to repeat itself.

The Covid-19 pandemic is far from over, but high-income, high-vaccination countries are already starting to talk about future pandemics while turning a blind eye to those that continue to affect poorer regions.

This will only prolong the pain of existing pandemics and endanger millions of lives. We urgently need a National Vaccine that will benefit everyone and everywhere.’

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