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Prince George organised a charity cake sale during lockdown

Revealed: Prince George (8) staged a cake sale during lockdown to raise money for Tusk, the endangered species charity supported by Prince William

  • Prince George held a cake sale during lockdown to raise money for Tusk
  • The third in line to the throne organized the sale for endangered animals
  • Eight-year-old Prince William’s father is the patron saint of the conservation charity
  • Chief Executive Officer Charlie Mayhew revealed the sweet gesture on GB News

Prince George organized a cake sale during the lockdown to raise money for endangered animals in Africa.

The third in line to the throne, who turns nine next month, staged the sale to raise money for Tusk’s charity, according to Tusk’s Chief Executive Officer Charlie Mayhew.

Prince William is the patron saint of the conservation charity and has traveled to Africa to visit projects it has supported in the past.

Revealing Prince George’s sweet gesture, Charlie told GB News: ‘Prince George very sweetly ran a small cake sale to raise money for Tusk during the lockdown and wrote a very sweet card about it, clearly showing his concern the wild animals in Africa.’

Prince George organized a cake sale during the lockdown to raise money for endangered animals in Africa (pictured with his sister Princess Charlotte)

Prince George organized a cake sale during the lockdown to raise money for endangered animals in Africa (pictured with his sister Princess Charlotte)

For 30 years, Tusk has supported local organizations with a lack of resources to help them protect animals and their habitats.

Before the charity existed, up to 100,000 elephants a year were killed by poachers in the illegal ivory trade.

In 2020, George shared his passion for animals with Sir David Attenborough, along with his siblings, Princess Charlotte, seven, and Prince Louis, four.

The veteran broadcaster gave George a fossilized giant shark tooth when they met at Kensington Palace and the young royal asked him which animal he thinks would go extinct next.

The third in line to the throne, who turns nine next month, staged the sale to raise money for the Tusk charity

The third in line to the throne, who turns nine next month, staged the sale to raise money for the Tusk charity

Sir David said to him: ‘Let us hope there won’t be any, for there are many things we can do when animals face extinction. We can protect them.’

George is the fourth generation of the royal family to be committed to environmental issues.

His father William, who turns 40 today, regularly sends WhatsApp messages to Tusk’s CEO “to discuss an issue that has occurred to him,” reports say.

Mayhew said the Duke’s patronage has led to more charity funding and more publicity to promote the wider conservation movement.

Prince William is the patron saint of the conservation charity and has traveled abroad to visit projects it has supported in the past (pictured in 2019)

Prince William is the patron saint of the conservation charity and has traveled abroad to visit projects it has supported in the past (pictured in 2019)

William with Tusk's Chief Executive Officer Charlie Mayhew during the filming of the 2010 Prince William's Africa television program

William with Tusk’s Chief Executive Officer Charlie Mayhew during the filming of the 2010 Prince William’s Africa television program

He said William is “using his patronage of Tusk as a means of conveying some very powerful messages.”

In 1970, William’s father, Prince Charles, gave his first major speech on the environment, believing that “economic and social development will succeed best when it works in harmony, rather than at odds with nature.”

Charles will attend the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Rwanda this week and is expected to spend a day on climate, health and the private sector.

The Prince will meet entrepreneurs from across the Commonwealth and discuss his Sustainable Markets Initiative, which aims to boost economies by harnessing the power of nature combined with the innovation and resources of private companies.

Charles’s late father, Prince Philip, was a lifelong conservationist and in 1961 became chairman of the British section of the World Wildlife Fund.

The CEO of Tusk hopes William will one day bring his children, George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis, to Africa so they can experience firsthand the work being done to protect wildlife for generations to come.

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