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Prince Andrew and Princess Beatrice to take back corgis Muick and Sandy after gifting them to Queen

Prince Andrew and Princess Beatrice take back corgis Muick and Sandy after gifting them to the Queen after Prince Phillip’s death last year

  • Dogs Muick and Sunday were given to the Queen after her husband’s death
  • She had resisted getting new dogs in recent years because she didn’t want to leave one behind after her death, but took the two off her son and his daughter
  • She accepted on the basis that they would return to Prince Andrew or Princess Beatrice
  • The fate of the late Queen’s other dog, Lissy, is yet to be decided
  • Full coverage: Click here to see all our coverage of the Queen’s death

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Prince Andrew and Princess Beatrice are expected to take care of two corgis they gave to the Queen.

The dogs – Muick and Sandy – were gifts from her second son and his eldest daughter after Prince Philip’s death in 2021.

Her Majesty had resisted adopting new dogs in recent years because she didn’t want to leave any behind after her death.

But it’s clear that she accepted the puppies on the assumption that Andrew or Beatrice would eventually get them back.

Candy, the queen's last remaining dorgi - a cross between a dachshund and a corgi - will likely join Muick and Sandy as well as the dogs are used to each other's company (Beginning this year in the queen's photo with Candy)

Candy, the queen’s last remaining dorgi – a cross between a dachshund and a corgi – will likely join Muick and Sandy as well as the dogs are used to each other’s company (Beginning this year in the queen’s photo with Candy)

The prince and Beatrice are said to have walked the dogs in recent months.

Candy, the queen’s last remaining dorgi – a cross between a dachshund and a corgi – will likely join Muick and Sandy as well as the dogs are used to each other’s company.

Otherwise, Candy will likely be given to a staff member. In the past, when the Queen bred litters of puppies, there was fierce competition to acquire one among the workers in her royal residences.

The fate of another dog owned by the late Queen, Lissy, whose pedigree name is Wolferton Drama, and the current champion of the Kennel Club’s Cocker Spaniel hunting dog, is yet to be decided. Named after the late Queen, Lissy lives with her trainer Ian Openshaw. A decision about her future is expected to be made by King Charles in the coming weeks.

The Queen was a well-known breeder of hunting dogs in Sandringham, and although Charles inherits the Norfolk estate, it is not yet known whether he will keep the breeding kennels.

The Queen owned at least 30 corgis in her lifetime, with ten generations of puppies descended from Susan, the corgi given to her as her father's 18th birthday present.

The Queen owned at least 30 corgis in her lifetime, with ten generations of puppies descended from Susan, the corgi given to her as her father's 18th birthday present.

The Queen owned at least 30 corgis in her lifetime, with ten generations of puppies descended from Susan, the corgi given to her as her father’s 18th birthday present.

Her dogs were treated royally, with their own room and raised wicker baskets

Her dogs were treated royally, with their own room and raised wicker baskets

Her dogs were treated royally, with their own room and raised wicker baskets

The Queen owned at least 30 corgis during her lifetime, with ten generations of puppies descended from Susan, the corgi given to her as an 18th birthday present from her father, the late King George VI.

She is also credited with inventing the ‘dorgi’ in 1971, when her corgi, Tiny, mated with her sister Princess Margaret’s dachshund, Pipkin.

Her dogs were treated royally, with their own room and raised wicker baskets. Meals of beef, chicken, rabbit, liver, cabbage and rice were usually prepared by a chef, but sometimes by the queen herself.

Prince Philip is said to have ‘abhorred’ the dogs’ barking. In 1989, it was reported that an animal behavior expert was called in to cure the corgis from their habit of biting members of the royal family. However, two years later, the queen tried to break up a corgi fight and required three stitches after being bitten in her left hand.

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