Pride flags are FORBIDDEN on military bases

0

Pride flags will be BANNED on military bases this year following the 2020 rule aimed at preventing people from flying the Confederate flag, restricting what can be flown

  • The decision comes after reconsidering a rule introduced last year limiting the types of flags that can be displayed on bases
  • That rule was intended to prohibit the display of the Confederate flag without specifically mentioning it
  • Defense Department officials said they decided not to make an exception for the Pride flag

The Defense Department has confirmed that it will not allow Pride flags on military installations in June.

The decision came after a re-evaluation of the existing policy put in place last year to ban the display of the Confederate flag without specifically mentioning it.

Authorized flags include the US flag, flags representing US states and territories, prisoners of war, and flags of US allies, as well as some others.

Defense officials had decided not to make an exception for the Pride flag.

F35 instructor pilots at Luke Airforce Base in June 2020.  Following a review, Pentagon officials said it will not be allowed to display the Pride flag at Department of Defense facilities this year

F35 instructor pilots at Luke Airforce Base in June 2020. Following a review, Pentagon officials said it will not be allowed to display the Pride flag at Department of Defense facilities this year

The decision to ban the flag from Pride this year stems from a July 2020 DoD policy against then Secretary of Defense Mark Esper (pictured) that limits the types of flags allowed at military facilities to just one. handful, including the American flag

Pentagon spokesman John Kirby spoke to reporters on Friday.  He said the decision not to make an exception for the Pride flag stemmed from concerns it could create the potential for

Pentagon spokesman John Kirby spoke to reporters on Friday. He said the decision not to make an exception for the Pride flag stemmed from concerns it could create the potential for “other challenges.”

“This in no way reflects any disrespect or admiration for people of the LGBTQ+ community, personnel in and out of uniform serving in this department,” Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told reporters on Friday. “We’re proud of them.”

Kirby said there were concerns about the possibility that “other challenges” could arise if an exception were made for one flag.

The Pentagon’s current flag policy dates back to July 2020, when top military officials were challenged to come up with a unified policy that would prohibit displaying the Confederate flag at military installations without angering former President Donald Trump.

Current policy is primarily to prohibit the display of the Confederate flag on military installations without specifically mentioning them

In honor of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month, sailors and citizens of Naval Air Station Key West display a 30-foot section of the original Key West sea-to-sea Pride flag in front of the main entrance in June 2017

In honor of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month, sailors and citizens of Naval Air Station Key West display a 30-foot section of the original Key West sea-to-sea Pride flag in front of the main entrance in June 2017

Airmen pose on the flightline after a Pride Month flight on June 26, 2020 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona

Airmen pose on the flightline after a Pride Month flight on June 26, 2020 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona

An early draft of the Defense Department’s plan banned the display of the Confederate flag and said the ban would “maintain the morale of our personnel, good order and discipline within military ranks and unit cohesion.”

Instead, seeking a compromise, officials decided to draw up a list of allowed flags without reference to which ones were not allowed.

Reactions on social media have been mixed with some applauding the decision and others disapproving.

‘America. Again with homophobic tendencies,” Brandon Gio tweeted.

“And that’s fine,” wrote Jackie Roush. Also no Trump flags or Confederate flags allowed. Fair enough.’

“Thank God,” wrote Ryan Ciminski. “I don’t want our flag to be tarnished by the war crimes that the DoD supports abroad.”

“Just fly the US flag and military flags at the bases,” tweeted @hosierfan515

Reactions on social media were mixed, with some disapproving of the decision and others cheering

Reactions on social media were mixed, with some disapproving of the decision and others cheering

Advertisement

.