Previously invisible photo's of Lockerbie made by a man who was chased by seeing the body of a young woman

Narrow escape: the house of Pter Giesecke (left) lost the windows, but he says his photo shows & # 39; how close we have come to be exterminated & # 39; on 21 December 1988

The image of a young dark-haired woman, dressed in a blue sweater and with her face down on his garden hedge, is one that Peter Giesecke can not take for less than 30 years.

A few minutes before his torch beam pointed out his frightened look at her lifeless figure in the darkness, he had watched Michael Aspel & This ?? s Your Life on television, when a deep rumbling had drawn him to the window.

Unaware of the hell that would unleash on 21 December 1988 in the town of Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire, he watched in bewilderment how a bright light – the broken remains of Pan Am Flight 103 – fell from the sky.

Narrow escape: the house of Pter Giesecke (left) lost the windows, but he says his photo shows & # 39; how close we have come to be exterminated & # 39; on 21 December 1988

Narrow escape: the house of Pter Giesecke (left) lost the windows, but he says his photo shows & # 39; how close we have come to be exterminated & # 39; on 21 December 1988

The aircraft had just left London Heathrow half an hour earlier and was on its way to New York with 243 passengers and 16 crew members on board, when a Semtex bomb that was hidden in a suitcase exploded at 31,000 feet.

The aircraft had just left London Heathrow half an hour earlier and was on its way to New York with 243 passengers and 16 crew members on board, when a Semtex bomb that was hidden in a suitcase exploded at 31,000 feet.

At 7.03 pm a deadly combination of mutilated hull and burning jet fuel had descended with deadly force on the town of Lockerbie, with the fireball burning houses in the Sherwood Crescent of the city and with it 11 inhabitants.

Meanwhile, the bodies of the tragic passengers aboard the doomed flight and their personal belongings were scattered over residential streets, surrounding gardens and the surrounding countryside.

Victim: student Lindsey Otenasek, from the University of Syracuse in New York, wanted to teach children

Victim: student Lindsey Otenasek, from the University of Syracuse in New York, wanted to teach children

Victim: student Lindsey Otenasek, from the University of Syracuse in New York, wanted to teach children

But for Mr. Giesecke, now 65, the discovery that night of one of those lost souls – Lindsey Otenasek, the 21-year-old student at the University of Syracuse who ended up on his hedge in the backyard – discovered an unbreakable bond of friendship with her family in the United States.

To this day, Lindsey's mother, Peggy, 85 still cherishes two small stones from Mr. Giesecke's garden which she found as a permanent reminder of where her daughter – the youngest of her six children – was found, and from the Scottish city who treated her and other victims with so much kindness and respect.

Yesterday evening Mr. Giesecke remembered the moment when the families met for the first time and said: "About a year after the bombing, I remember working in my garden when I was a few unsure on the sidewalk outside my port.

The woman looked at me and said: "I believe my daughter Lindsey was found in your garden."

& # 39; In the same circumstances we were used to families walking around the streets, so their visit was not really unexpected. I had never learned the identity of the girl in my hedge, but I had never forgotten her. & # 39;

He added: & # 39; The garden and area had already been cleaned. The hedge was gone and there were fresh pebbles down. I showed her exactly where I found her and she was very grateful that I could explain what happened that night.

Lives in ruins: a policeman looks over the debris of houses that were destroyed in the disaster where all 243 passengers and 16 crew members were killed on board

Lives in ruins: a policeman looks over the debris of houses that were destroyed in the disaster where all 243 passengers and 16 crew members were killed on board

Lives in ruins: a policeman looks over the debris of houses that were destroyed in the disaster where all 243 passengers and 16 crew members were killed on board

Aftermath: A crater in the city, filled with the wreck of a deadly combination of mutilated hull and burnt jet fuel that rained down on Lockerbie with lethal force

Aftermath: A crater in the city, filled with the wreck of a deadly combination of mutilated hull and burnt jet fuel that rained down on Lockerbie with lethal force

Aftermath: A crater in the city, filled with the wreck of a deadly combination of mutilated hull and burnt jet fuel that rained down on Lockerbie with lethal force

Debris: large parts of the plane strewn in the streets of Lockerbie as seen in this photo taken by Mr. Giesecke after the disaster

Debris: large parts of the plane strewn in the streets of Lockerbie as seen in this photo taken by Mr. Giesecke after the disaster

Debris: large parts of the plane strewn in the streets of Lockerbie as seen in this photo taken by Mr. Giesecke after the disaster

I felt burst into tears when Peggy picked one up and I remember telling her: "Take that home and keep it in memory of Lindsey."

& # 39; We still keep in touch with Christmas and send cards and flowers. Now that my own daughter is 21, it makes me even more clear what she lost that night. It is devastating. & # 39;

Forty-six seconds after the bomb exploded on Pan Am flight 103, the wing of the plane hit Sherwood Crescent, close to the home of Mr. Giesecke's Park Place, at a speed of 500 mph, disintegrating at the impact and the leaving a crater of 150ft long and 30ft deep.

Witness: Peter Giesecke with the debris of the Clipper Maid of the Seas & # 39; that had left London Heathrow half an hour earlier

Witness: Peter Giesecke with the debris of the Clipper Maid of the Seas & # 39; that had left London Heathrow half an hour earlier

Witness: Peter Giesecke with the debris of the Clipper Maid of the Seas & # 39; that had left London Heathrow half an hour earlier

Just over the fence, in Rosebank Crescent, a large part of the hull also covered entire sides of property.

Previously invisible photos, taken by Mr. Giesecke the morning after the incident and published today in the Scottish Mail, show the extent of the destruction of the quiet neighborhood in which he still lives on the eastern edge of the city.

He said: "We all had to evacuate our houses because it was too dangerous to stay there, but I would go back the next day to get some bits and pieces. That's when I picked up my camera and decided to take some pictures of the horror around me.

When I saw the crater where my neighbors' houses had been, the damage to houses next to mine and the debris everywhere, it eventually touched me how close we had become to being swept away. & # 39;

Mr. Giesecke, who had just put his children to bed for the atrocity, remembered: "When the hull struck the streets, the windows blew into the back of our house, the lights went out, and we were in darkness. . The children came down the stairs, screaming. There was glass and debris everywhere, as well as a strong smell of jet fuel.

So I got a torch and I shined the torch outside. There were bodies everywhere. But forever in my mind is Lindsey, although I only got to know her name much later. She lay down with my face on my hedge. She wore a blue top, a sweater. & # 39;

The remains of more than 60 people were eventually removed from his little corner.

Devastation: debris of houses and the plane strewn by gardens where the bodies of passengers aboard the doomed flight and their possessions were scattered over residential streets and the surrounding countryside

Devastation: debris of houses and the plane strewn by gardens where the bodies of passengers aboard the doomed flight and their possessions were scattered over residential streets and the surrounding countryside

Devastation: debris of houses and the plane strewn by gardens where the bodies of passengers aboard the doomed flight and their possessions were scattered over residential streets and the surrounding countryside

During the months after the bombing, family members of Pan Am's passengers arrived in Lockerbie, seeking comfort and answers to the deaths of their loved ones.

Among them were the parents of Lindsey, Richard, an eminent neurosurgeon, and his wife, Peggy, of Baltimore, Maryland.

Yesterday, from her home in Baltimore, Mrs. Otenasek said: "I will never meet Peter because my dear daughter was found in his garden.

The series of homages of the city on the occasion of a tragic anniversary

The community of Lockerbie will hold a series of poignant memorials in the city on Friday to commemorate the anniversary.

The first will take place at 9:00 in Rosebank Crescent, where many of the bodies of the passengers and crew of Pan Am can be found.

An hour later, the locals gather in the Tundergarth church, near the place where the cockpit of Clipper Maid of the Seas came to rest.

At 11 o'clock, residents of Sherwood Crescent – and the survivors who lived there – will remember the terrible night that claimed the lives of 11 local people.

At each location, a & # 39; moment of silence & # 39; respected and laid a wreath.

The Main Commemoration is a service on the grounds of the Dryfesdale cemetery, where there is a memorial with the names of all 270 victims.

It will be attended by Foreign Minister David Mundell, the local MP, politicians, dignitaries and the local population.

A spokeswoman for the organizers, Lockerbie and District Community Council, said: "The early events are open to local people. If they want to continue to Main Commemoration, they are welcome. & X 39 text

She had been so excited to go home at Christmas. She was my youngest, a sweet girl who was so funny and wanted to teach deaf children.

I remember that I had baked before her arrival and that our house looked like Christmas and smelled of Christmas, while we waited for our family to be with us again. & # 39;

She added: "It was one of Lindsey's friends who called me to check on which flight she was, because she had heard that an accident had happened. When we received a phone call from Pan Am later that day to say that they had Lindsey's boarding pass and that she had been on the plane, we were deeply grieved.

A year later we finally traveled to Lockerbie because we thought the journey was very difficult. In the end it was heart-warming. The people in the city were simply beautiful. & # 39;

She added: "We were standing just outside Peter's house and he came to us and said to us: & # 39; I know why you are here & # 39 ;. The feelings we felt were overwhelming, it was so powerful. He was so hospitable, and as I stood beside the spot where Lindsey fell, I took two small stones from the garden.

& # 39; Every day since then I look at those who are sitting at my desk and I pray for my daughter and the people of Lockerbie for what they have been through.

As far as Peter and his family are concerned, there will always be a special bond and he will always be part of our family. & # 39;

In the aftermath of Lindsey & # 39; s death, the Otenasek family has established a charitable foundation in its name to help finance students who want to work with children with special needs.

They plan to travel to the Arlington National Cemetery on Friday, outside Washington DC, for a memorial to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the bombing.

Lindsey's brother, Rick, said: & # 39; She was my little sister and we were always around. We felt that we were dealing with a terrorist event on top of my sister's death.

My parents were great and from the start it was all about looking ahead and the politics around the circumstances of what happened just did not happen.

From above: an aerial photograph of the damage caused by the Pam Am Flight 103 in the city of Lockerbie, Dumfrieshire

From above: an aerial photograph of the damage caused by the Pam Am Flight 103 in the city of Lockerbie, Dumfrieshire

From above: an aerial photograph of the damage caused by the Pam Am Flight 103 in the city of Lockerbie, Dumfrieshire

We only had to trust the research process and concentrate on it. Laying the foundation and turning Lindsey's death into something positive helped us all with our grief. & # 39;

Ms Otenasek knows she will probably not visit Lockerbie because of her age, but earlier this month she was thrilled when & # 39; Lockerbie came to her & # 39 ;.

A team of cyclists from the city – including Colin Dorrance, who served the youngest policeman – completed a fundraising charity – the cycle to Syracuse – which began in September in Scotland.

The group, which wanted to show the community that they thought of those who had not come home in December 1988, took part in a formal ceremony at the University of Syracuse to remind the 35 students who were lost in the tragedy.

When the Otenasek family discovered that the route of the cyclists was only two miles from their home, they made a point of meeting them.

A delighted Mrs. Otenasek said: "I took my two small stones to show them that they would always have a special place in my heart.

What they have achieved is so uplifting and I will never forget these fantastic people. & # 39;

.