President Macron's ambition to embarrass the year-long brexit delay in the UK & # 39;

Theresa May today accused MPs of not voting through her EU divorce agreement and said to them: & # 39; We could already have gone free & # 39; – while facing another humiliating slowdown in the Brexit imposed on it by European leaders this evening.

The prime minister must ask EU leaders in Brussels to send Brexit back to June 30, but they will ignore that request and impose a delay until December 31 or even March 31, 2020.

The EU is also prepared to impose humiliating circumstances imposed by French President Emmanuel Macron, such as regular & # 39; behavioral evaluations & # 39; from the UK and a & # 39; Boris-proof & # 39; Finally, a new Tory leader cannot cancel Ms. May's deal if she stops.

In Parliament today, the Prime Minister was attacked by her own MPs with Eurosceptic Henry Smith who accused her of throwing £ 1 billion a month in payment to Brussels if she accepted a longer extension of Article 50 tonight.

Mrs May replied: "We could already be outside the EU if we succeeded in getting the deal through Parliament and I will continue to work to deliver the Brexit."

But with conversations with Labor starting again tomorrow, Mrs. May and Jeremy Corbyn have completely avoided the subject and instead exceeded the municipal tax during the Prime Minister's questions.

Mrs. May will now fly to Brussels while EU leaders urge Emmanuel Macron not to humiliate her & # 39; at tonight's historic summit, where they are expected to impose a long delay on Britain leaving the block. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and European Council President Donald Tusk have urged the French president to show respect to prevent fabrication relations – but Brexiteers claim that the UK is already a & # 39; laugher & # 39; is.

Former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said today that Ms. May should not & # 39; drift & # 39; if it accepts the longer delay of the EU and must stop before it regains confidence. He said: "It is almost certain that she would lose, it would be humiliating."

But Justice Minister David Gauke suggested that the prime minister for up to a year from a sense of & # 39; duty & # 39; could stay.

And in more bad news for the prime minister, a new Kantar poll, the Tories found nine points in a month, which would place Jeremy Corbyn in No. 10 if there were general elections.

Theresa May spoke to MPs in the Commons on the Prime Minister's questions today prior to her trip to Brussels, where EU leaders are supposed to ignore her plea to ignore a short Brexit delay, despite her travels to Berlin and Paris yesterday

Theresa May spoke to MPs in the Commons on the Prime Minister's questions today prior to her trip to Brussels, where EU leaders are supposed to ignore her plea to ignore a short Brexit delay, despite her travels to Berlin and Paris yesterday

WHAT HAPPENS WITH BREXIT NEXT?

WEDNESDAY APRIL 10: EU-TOP

Another summit with EU leaders – where May after 12 April will ask for another delay.

May & # 39; s new plan is to reach a consensus between parties in London and to convince EU leaders. This means that the deal can be delivered on time for the Brexit on 22 May.

She may have to accept a longer extension, which means that she is holding EU elections, because Brussels has made it clear that this is a red line – and will decide on a postponement without Britain and it must be unanimous.

EU officials, including Michel Barnier, have warned that if May arrives without a plan, the risk of an unintended No Deal increases.

THURSDAY APRIL 11: PM & # 39; S FACES MPs

Theresa May returns from Brussels with an extension expected to last nine to twelve months and will outline her plans in the Commons at the EU Summit.

FRIDAY APRIL 12: BREXIT DAY

Britain must leave the EU without a deal on this date if no delay has been agreed.

Tonight, the EU is expected to request a delay of between nine and 12 months to allow & # 39; the UK to reconsider its Brexit strategy & # 39; together with a & # 39; Boris-proof & # 39; clause stopping a new Brexiteer Tory leader who is tearing Mrs. May's deal.

It came when Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, admitted that the EU is now in control, but tried to shift the blame by saying: & # 39; The government has made a deal. Parliament refused to honor the result of the referendum & # 39 ;.

Angela Merkel is supposed to have Emmanuel Macron in several recent phone calls & # 39; accepted & # 39; while the last night Mr. Tusk made a personal plea for him to request his & # 39; good behavior & # 39; assessment for Great Britain to be withdrawn every three months.

He said: & # 39; Neither party should feel humiliated. Whatever course of action is followed, it must not be influenced by negative emotions. We must treat the UK with the utmost respect, because we want to remain friends and close partners and because we still have to agree on our future relationships. & # 39;

DUP Westminster leader Nigel Dodds labeled the conversations as & # 39; humiliating and shameful & # 39; for the UK and claimed that Britain was postponing a begging bowl against European leaders & # 39 ;.

Tory MP Anne Main has said that the UK is a & # 39; joke & # 39; was becoming and calling it & # 39; terrible that we might be looking for an extension without a real purposeful feeling & # 39 ;.

New vote & # 39; within a few days & # 39; if Labor agrees on a Brexit deal with Theresa May

The Brexit legislation can be brought back to the Commons in the days that the government can reach a deal with Labor, ministers said last night.

Two government sources said that the discussions on the post were underway on the possibility of asking MPs to vote this week on the bill agreement in the hope of leaving the EU the following month.

Ministers also reserved the right to shorten the Easter holidays by asking MPs to sit next week on Monday and Tuesday if a deal seems to be close. On the basis of one proposal, the government would agree to allow free votes on important demands of the labor market, such as a customs union and a second referendum. If they were hired, they would be included in the Theresa May deal.

But a Whitehall source said last night that the & # 39; risky & # 39; strategy would only be considered if ministers were sure Labor was included.

& # 39; The problem is that if you place the Withdrawal Account for MPs and vote it, you will be lost for this session. You should prorogate Parliament to bring it back, so it's pretty risky. & # 39;

Brexitate Labor MP Kate Hoey said: & It seems really humiliating for this country to let our prime minister go to the European Union to literally beg for an extension. What does this say about our country? & # 39;

During the Prime Minister's questions today, labor manager Jeremy Corbyn said the talks are continuing in an effort to find a compromise for the Brexit deal – but went quickly.

Mr. Corbyn then claimed that communities across the country were abandoned & # 39; are by the government, adding: & # 39; Official figures show that nine of the 10 most disadvantaged council areas in this country have cut nearly three times the average of another council.

& # 39; Why did the prime minister decide to cut off the poorest neighborhoods in our country more than the wealthiest? & # 39;

Mrs. May said that the councils have more money available this year and an increase in real terms is foreseen, and added: & # 39; (Mr. Corbyn) voted against making money available. & # 39;

She also urged the EU to be in an & # 39; orderly manner & # 39; the best Brexit for the UK, after being asked why she is not pursuing a deal by one of her pwn MPs.

Tory Craig Tracey urged the prime minister to consider leaving on Friday to respect their party's manifest commitments to leave the customs union and the internal market.

He said: "Do you agree that, as the best way to do that, instead of delivering the watered down deal that is unrecognizable to many of us who voted to leave, the WTO must be met rules, then we must seize that opportunity and believe in the ability of the British people and the conservative government to make it a success? & # 39;

Mrs May replied: "Can I agree with you that I believe that a conservative government will be a success regardless of the Brexit situation.

& # 39; But I still believe that the best Brexit for the UK is that we can leave in an orderly manner to leave with a deal. & # 39; Ms. May added that some MEPs do not want to respect & # 39; respect the result of the referendum & # 39 ;, and added: & # 39; I am doing. & # 39;

The Westminster leader of the SNP, Ian Blackford, then asked if a second referendum was offered to Labor to trick them into a cross-party Brexit deal – but Mrs. May refused to say, adding her point of view is not. changed & # 39 ;.

Theresa May flies to Brussels today to request a delay until the end of June - but the EU only offers Emmanuel Macron nine months or a year ready to flex his muscles after their meeting yesterday

Theresa May flies to Brussels today to request a delay until the end of June - but the EU only offers Emmanuel Macron nine months or a year ready to flex his muscles after their meeting yesterday

Theresa May flies to Brussels today to request a delay until the end of June – but the EU only offers Emmanuel Macron nine months or a year ready to flex his muscles after their meeting yesterday

President of the European Council Donald Tusk pictured today

President of the European Council Donald Tusk pictured today

Boris Johnson arrives at parliament yesterday

Boris Johnson arrives at parliament yesterday

Donald Tusk (left today) personally appealed to Macron to drop his request for a & # 39; good conduct & # 39; assessment for Great Britain every three months – but strict rules with clauses to allow Brexiteers to Boris Johnson to quit (just yesterday), Ms. May & # 39; s deal is likely to tear apart

EU President Donald Tusk has warned that strict conditions would be attached to any extended postponement.

And he said that the stalled withdrawal agreement would by no means be canceled, including the election of a new Tory leader.

The Prime Minister is asking for a short delay in trying to get the agreement through Parliament, possibly in a compromise with Labor. But government sources said that they had now resigned for a longer period if EU leaders demanded it.

The Austrian Foreign Minister said she believed that an extension of the Brexit for the UK would be approved by the EU.

Karin Kneissl told BBC Radio 4 & # 39; s Today program: & # 39; Basically I have the impression that this is somehow resolved. But I still assume that there can be a lot of conditions. & # 39;

Mrs. May insisted that she could not ensure that the departure of Great Britain would be postponed after 30 June, but that it would now be adopted.

Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay admitted today that the EU is now in charge – but accuses members of parliament and said, "Parliament has forced this – not the government."

He added: & # 39; I don't want to see a delay of up to a year. But the key with some delay is that we can end it once we have ratified it so that we can continue to make a deal through Parliament, ratify that agreement and leave the EU.

& # 39; And I think that's what the EU leaders want, it's what the prime minister wants & # 39 ;.

European Commission President, Jean-Claude Juncker, in Brussels today, prior to tonight's Brexit summit

European Commission President, Jean-Claude Juncker, in Brussels today, prior to tonight's Brexit summit

EU negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels today, prior to tonight's Brexit summit

EU negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels today, prior to tonight's Brexit summit

President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker and EU negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels today prior to tonight's Brexit summit

He also confirmed that if the talks with Labor fail, the government & # 39; indicative & # 39; votes should change to & # 39; binding votes & # 39; about the Brexit options to continue them. But that would increase the risk of a customs union or a second referendum, which Mrs May said earlier was her red line.

He said: & # 39; The Prime Minister has said that we will come back to Parliament and see how we get clarity about a vote.

& # 39; One of the challenges that will be there is how we have a stable majority to follow the legislation that would follow that vote.

& # 39; But we are coming back to Parliament and trying to reach consensus on the different options. & # 39;

Barclay said, "I don't think a permanent customs union is a good way to move on. We actually negotiated something better in the political statement. & # 39;

The Prime Minister was confronted with a major Commons uprising last night, with 97 Tory MPs voting against any delay until the departure date of 12 April. Nearly 80 people abstain more, including a series of ministers.

Labor supported the Brexit day delay and helped it with 420 votes to 110. But only 131 Tory MPs supported the prime minister's plan – 40 percent of the parliamentary party.

The cabinet ministers, Andrea Leadsom and Liam Fox, who both abstained, both publicly challenged the prime minister's tactics.

Mrs Leadsom urged her to ask German Chancellor Angela Merkel to reopen the withdrawal agreement – despite the fact that the EU repeatedly ruled out this. Dr. Fox struck suggestions that Mrs. May could make to keep Britain in a customs union as part of a compromise with Labor.

Advocate General Robert Buckland told MPs that the UK would be legally obliged to participate in the European Parliament elections if it were a Member State on 23 May.

But he suggested that British delegates might not have to take their seats if Westminster agreed on an exit plan in the coming weeks.

Downing Street indicated that Ms Merkel (pictured today) had agreed to an extension of Article 50 to ensure "the ordered withdrawal of Britain" - she preferred a Brexit postponement until March 2020

Downing Street indicated that Ms Merkel (pictured today) had agreed to an extension of Article 50 to ensure "the ordered withdrawal of Britain" - she preferred a Brexit postponement until March 2020

Downing Street indicated that Ms Merkel (pictured today) had agreed to an extension of Article 50 to ensure "the ordered withdrawal of Britain" – she preferred a Brexit postponement until March 2020

Downing Street indicated that Ms Merkel had accepted an extension of Article 50 to ensure "the orderly withdrawal of Britain".

Eurosceptically says that the Brexit delay will be illegal and will not make a statement about it

Eurosceptic Conservative MP Bill Cash tweeted a letter he had sent to the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, claiming that & # 39; any decision by the prime minister to accept a long extension of article 50 is likely to be challenged at the UK courts & # 39 ;.

In his letter, which he considered during his current EU Council meetings & # 39; eligible & # 39; Mr Cash wrote: & # 39; It is a fundamental principle of British constitutional law that the government should not use their powers – including their powers to conclude international agreements – to frustrate Parliament's intention .

& # 39; It is very important to note that Parliament's legal intention that the UK leaves the EU does not depend on a withdrawal agreement, & # 39; he added.

Mr Cash continued: "There is a clear legal path for Parliament's legislative will to be achieved: the UK can exercise its legal right to leave the EU on 12 April 2019 in accordance with Article 50 (3).

& # 39; A long extension, without any reason why it is necessary to have the UK come out of the EU, is simply not something the Prime Minister can legally agree to.

& # 39; It would amount to a well-considered decision to frustrate Parliament's expressed will as a lawsuit. & # 39;

But there is a risk that French President Emmanuel Macron, who has questioned the delay, would be able to veto or impose tough conditions at the Brussels summit tomorrow night.

Mrs May can refuse the EU offer with a long wait. But ministers fear that MPs can vote to revoke Article 50 and cancel Brexit altogether, unless a delay is agreed tonight. At a meeting of EU ministers in Luxembourg, the chief negotiator of the bloc, Michel Barnier, said that a short extension was realistic because Mrs. May had a plan to break the deadlock.

But according to two diplomatic notes that the Post saw, there was a & # 39; growing trend & # 39; and & # 39; convergence of opinions & # 39; to a date much later than 30 June.

The sources showed that EU leaders should now extend Article 50 to at least the end of this year.

Mr Tusk told EU leaders last night that there was little reason to believe that Mrs May could reach an agreement through Parliament in July.

& # 39; Granting such an extension would increase the risk of a rolling series of short extensions and emergency summits, creating new deadline dates, & # 39; he said.

He urged EU leaders to have a & # 39; flexible extension & # 39; agree that would allow the UK to leave early if it could ratify a deal. But he added: & # 39; In the event of a sustained stalemate, a longer extension would allow the UK to reconsider its Brexit strategy. & # 39;

EU leaders are shocked by warnings from Brexit hardliners, including Jacob Rees-Mogg, that the UK can apply destruction measures if it stays in the EU, such as voting its budget.

According to Tusk, the UK would be expected to guarantee that it would work in a spirit of & # 39; sincere cooperation & # 39 ;.

Tory Eurosceptic Anne-Marie Morris warned that she could vote for Nigel Farage's new Brexit party in the European Parliament elections in protest against the delay.

And Boris Johnson & # 39; s father Stanley revealed that he hopes to be a candidate on May 23, almost three years after Britain decided to leave.

Tories deposit NINE points in a month amid Brexit chaos, since more than half of voters say they now support a second referendum

The Tory party has dumped nine points in the polls that a new survey suggests today.

Kantar's latest research shows that the Brexit chaos is finally getting support for the Theresa May party, as the prime minister is looking for a second delay to leave the EU.

The company noted that conservatives are supported by 32 percent, compared to 41 percent in the same survey in March.

The dramatic poll means Labor takes the lead with Kantar after raising four points, from 31 percent to 35 percent.

The Liberal Democrats have also received a group and received support from 3 to 11 percent in the new survey.

Kantar & # 39; s new poll also believes that more than half of people are now in favor of referring the Brexit deal to a referendum.

Kantar's latest research shows that the Brexit chaos is finally receiving support for the Theresa May party, as the prime minister wants a second delay to leave the EU

Kantar's latest research shows that the Brexit chaos is finally receiving support for the Theresa May party, as the prime minister wants a second delay to leave the EU

Kantar's latest research shows that the Brexit chaos is finally receiving support for the Theresa May party, as the prime minister wants a second delay to leave the EU

The poll findings were published when EU leaders today urged Emmanuel Macron not to humiliate Mrs. May & # 39; at tonight's historic summit, where they are expected to impose a long delay on Brexit in the UK

The poll findings were published when EU leaders today urged Emmanuel Macron not to humiliate Mrs. May & # 39; at tonight's historic summit, where they are expected to impose a long delay on Brexit in the UK

The poll findings were published when EU leaders today urged Emmanuel Macron not to humiliate Mrs. May & # 39; at tonight's historic summit, where they are expected to impose a long delay on Brexit in the UK

Of all voters, 51 percent say it must have a public vote, while only 32 percent vote against. Let the voters split 53 percent to 35 percent, while the remaining voters are heavily split 62 percent to 22 percent in favor.

The poll shows that if a new referendum was held, 41 percent would say they would stay, with 35 percent back leave – with only nine percent they don't say it and the rest swear not to participate at all.

Kantar & # 39; s new poll also believes that more than half of people are now in favor of referring the Brexit deal to a referendum. Of all voters, 51 percent say it must have a public vote, while only 32 percent vote against

Kantar & # 39; s new poll also believes that more than half of people are now in favor of referring the Brexit deal to a referendum. Of all voters, 51 percent say it must have a public vote, while only 32 percent vote against

Kantar & # 39; s new poll also believes that more than half of people are now in favor of referring the Brexit deal to a referendum. Of all voters, 51 percent say it must have a public vote, while only 32 percent vote against

The Tories have set a trend in the polls in recent weeks while the Brexit chaos continues to engage the nation

The Tories have set a trend in the polls in recent weeks while the Brexit chaos continues to engage the nation

The Tories have set a trend in the polls in recent weeks while the Brexit chaos continues to engage the nation

Fewer than one in four say Britain must end the impasse by leaving the EY with No Deal, with one in three saying the Brexit should be canceled instead.

The poll findings were published when EU leaders today urged Emmanuel Macron not to humiliate Mrs. May & # 39; at tonight's historic summit, where they are expected to impose a long delay on Brexit in the UK.

Will the Brexit ever happen? It seems that the EU is forcing May to extend for a year, but this is likely to happen if Britain's exit is dropped off tonight.

Britain will be delayed one year tonight for the Brexit after Theresa May has effectively scrapped the prospect of No Deal on Friday.

The prime minister's hope for a short extension that ends in June seems to be doomed as she prepared to fly to Brussels after today's PMQs.

The number of EU leaders varies, but the fall of Article 50 seems likely to have shifted until the end of this year.

Ms. May could be given the option to break the extension early if her deal eventually passed Parliament – but EU President Donald Tusk has been publicly warned that there is & # 39; little reason & # 39; is to believe that this will happen someday.

French President Emmanuel Macron has adopted the most hardened attitude, insisting that Britain be bound by strict rules to prevent it from misbehaving during a new delay. However, it is highly unlikely that he will actually veto the delay.

When the summit starts tonight at 5 p.m., Ms. May will first answer questions from EU leaders – building on a diplomatic thunderbolt with to Paris and Berlin yesterday.

It is then put out of the top so that the other 27 EU leaders can decide what to do during dinner. Only when they have reached unanimous agreement on delays, Ms May is asked to say Yes or No.

At the last summit three weeks ago, EU leaders debated nearly six hours in private. A similar line this time means that the fate of Britain will be decided around midnight.

Whatever happens, the prime minister must return to the Commons tomorrow to explain to parliamentarians when and when the Brexit will ever happen.

What did Mrs. May ask for?

In a letter to Donald Tusk, she formally requested an extension of Article 50, which postpones the UK's departure after 12 April to 30 June, but also wants a & # 39; termination clause & # 39 ;.

This would allow the UK to leave on 22 May – the day before the European elections – if a deal could be passed through the British parliament.

However, this delay is a reflection of the delay requested by Mrs May before the last emergency stop in March – which was rejected.

What did the EU say?

Mr. Tusk said that a & # 39; flex extension & # 39; from 12 months to 29 March 2020 & # 39; the only reasonable way out & # 39; is out of the crisis and has urged leaders of the 27 EU member states to support him at the Wednesday summit.

In anticipation of today's summit, Mr. Tusk urged the 27 leaders to consider a long delay, as there is & # 39; little reason & # 39; was to believe that the deal would be adopted by MPs before the end of June.

He said that the Brexit by & # 39; no longer than a year & # 39; must be put off with Britain to leave if and when the deal somehow passes through Parliament.

If it is confirmed tonight, such an extension is likely to create a furore among Tory Brexiteer's MPs. Jacob Rees-Mogg suggests that if we were detained, we would have to suffer from the rest of the EU politically.

And Mrs. May said earlier that she would not be able to accept such a delay – suggesting that it could make her resign. This could lead to a summer lead in Tory ranks before a new, most likely Brexiteer leader takes over.

How does the EU make a decision?

When the summit starts tonight at 5 p.m., Ms. May will first answer questions from EU leaders – building on a diplomatic thunderbolt with to Paris and Berlin yesterday.

It is then put out of the top so that the other 27 EU leaders can decide what to do during dinner. Only when they have reached unanimous agreement on delays, Ms May is asked to say Yes or No.

At the last summit three weeks ago, EU leaders debated nearly six hours in private. A similar line this time means that the fate of Britain will be decided around midnight.

When will the Brexit be?

It is hard to say – but it is highly unlikely that this will happen on Friday, as the law currently says.

The Prime Minister clearly still wants to leave the EU before the elections to the European Parliament have to take place on 22 May, but this is ultimately up to Brussels.

If she gets the deal in the coming weeks, it is probably possible to close at the end of May.

However, if it fails again, the exit day is likely to be pushed back by at least nine to twelve months – paving the way for a change of prime minister in Downing Street and possibly an election or referendum, or even both.

What happens in the conversations between different parties?

The prime minister said the divorce agreement could not be changed, but announced last week that she wanted to reach a new consensus with Jeremy Corbyn on the political statement on the final agreement between the UK and the EU. It is her last roll of the dice to save the deal.

On Friday, the talks between ministers and officials from both parties failed, despite previous efforts being seen as & # 39; constructive & # 39; were praised. After technical discussions on Monday, they finally resumed yesterday – but are now postponed again until tomorrow.

If the talks fail, Ms. May has promised to submit options to Parliament and to be bound by the outcome. The time is short to actually call this vote.

In a second round of indicative votes last week, a customs union, soft Brexit in Norway style and a second referendum were the leading options, but none received a majority of MPs.

What does Mrs May's change mean?

Mrs. May has given up all hope to win the remaining Tory Brexiteers and the DUP on the terms of her current deal.

In order to reach an agreement between the parties on Labor about the future relationship, Ms May will be required to set aside many of her red lines – including potential for free movement and striking trade agreements.

Om een ​​akkoord te bereiken met Labour, zal mevrouw May het erover eens moeten zijn dat de politieke verklaring een veel zachtere Brexit zou moeten zijn dan haar huidige plannen.

Dit kan een permanente douane-unie tussen de EU en het VK betekenen of zelfs op de eengemaakte EU-markt blijven.

Wat als mijnheer Corbyn Nee zegt?

Mevrouw May zei dat als ze geen deal met Corbyn kan sluiten, ze het Parlement zou vragen om met opties te komen – en beloofde de bevelen van parlementsleden op te volgen.

In een tweede ronde van indicatieve stemmen vorige week waren een douane-unie, zachte Brexit in Noorwegen-stijl en een tweede referendum de leidende opties, maar geen enkele kreeg een meerderheid van de parlementsleden.

Ze zouden waarschijnlijk passeren als de Tories voor hen geslagen hadden – maar het zou bijna zeker betekenen dat ministers de regering zouden verlaten.

Het Instituut voor Overheid heeft in kaart gebracht hoe een cruciale week in het Brexit-eindspel mogelijk zou kunnen verlopen vóór een mogelijke No Deal Brexit op vrijdag

Het Instituut voor Overheid heeft in kaart gebracht hoe een cruciale week in het Brexit-eindspel mogelijk zou kunnen verlopen vóór een mogelijke No Deal Brexit op vrijdag

Het Instituut voor Overheid heeft in kaart gebracht hoe een cruciale week in het Brexit-eindspel mogelijk zou kunnen verlopen vóór een mogelijke No Deal Brexit op vrijdag

Mag ik aftreden?

Nodbody weet het zeker. Mevrouw May heeft aangekondigd dat ze zou gaan als en wanneer haar echtscheidingsovereenkomst zou worden aangenomen, zodat een nieuwe Tory-leider de fase van de handelsbesprekingen zou kunnen overnemen.

In de praktijk heeft het mevrouw May alle resterende politieke kapitaal uitgeput. De meesten in Westminster denken dat haar Premierschap uiterlijk binnen enkele weken voorbij is.

Toen haar deal veertien dagen geleden voor de derde keer werd ingeklapt, kreeg ze te maken met onmiddellijke oproepen van Labour-leider Jeremy Corbyn, dus stop onmiddellijk.

Wat wel duidelijk is, is dat er al een strijd gaande is voor het leiderschap van Tory.

Is het gemeen dat er verkiezingen zullen zijn?

Waarschijnlijk op een gegeven moment, hoewel de onmiddellijke kansen zijn gevallen als gevolg van de nieuwste gebeurtenissen. De Commons zit vast en de regering heeft geen functionele meerderheid. Hoewel de wet op het vaste termijn parlement betekent dat de regering kan struikelen, zal deze steeds machtelozer worden.

Mevr. May zou kunnen proberen er zelf een te bellen of, ervan uitgaande dat ze ophoudt, zou haar opvolger dat kunnen doen.

Zou de Tories een vroege verkiezing kunnen leiden?

Onwaarschijnlijk. Nadat ze haar partij had toegelaten, zou ze gaan als de deal wordt aangenomen, is de politieke carrière van mevrouw May gedoemd.

Hoewel er geen procedurele manier is om haar te verwijderen, zou een terugtrekking van de politieke steun van het kabinet of het hoofdkantoor van Tory haar waarschijnlijk afronden, zelfs als ze wilde blijven.

Hoe wordt een verkiezing genoemd? Wanneer zou het zijn?

Vanwege de Wet op het vaste termijn parlementen die door de coalitie is aangenomen, kan de premier niet langer eenvoudig de koningin vragen om de commons te ontbinden en een verkiezing te houden. Er zijn in plaats daarvan twee procedures.

Ten eerste – en dit is wat er gebeurde in 2017 – kan de regering een motie indienen in de Commons waarin wordt opgeroepen tot vervroegde verkiezingen. Cruciaal genoeg kan dit alleen slagen met een tweederde meerderheid van de parlementsleden – wat betekent dat een van de belangrijkste partijen het kan blokkeren.

Ten tweede wordt een verkiezing genoemd als de regering een motie van wantrouwen verliest en er binnen 14 dagen geen nieuwe administratie kan worden gebouwd.

In de praktijk kan dit alleen gebeuren als de rebellen van Tory stemmen met de heer Corbyn – een stap die een einde zou maken aan de carrière van een conservatieve parlementslid die de stap heeft gezet.

Een verkiezing duurt van het begin tot het einde minimaal vijf weken en het zou een week of twee duren voordat het Parlement zijn deuren had gesloten, bekend als ontbinding – de vroegst mogelijke stemdag rond midden tot eind mei.

Als de Tories eerst een leiderschapsverkiezing houden, zal de verkiezing waarschijnlijk op zijn vroegst tot uiterlijk eind juni worden uitgesteld.

Waarom zeggen mensen dat er verkiezingen moeten zijn?

De vraag om een ​​verkiezing te houden bereikte het kabinet vorige week eindelijk.

Brexit-secretaris Stephen Barclay waarschuwde ervoor dat de afwijzing van de deal van mevrouw May een reeks gebeurtenissen in gang zou zetten die zou leiden tot een zachtere Brexit – wat een verkiezing betekent omdat zoveel parlementsleden manifesto beloftes moeten breken.

Kamerleden die stemmen om greep te krijgen op de Brexit van ministers hebben alleen de eisen aangewakkerd.

Labour pleit al maanden voor een nieuwe stemming en dringt erop aan dat de regering de Brexit niet heeft afgeleverd.

De heer Corbyn noemde een motie van wantrouwen in de regering in januari, waarin hij benadrukte dat het mislukken van de eerste zinvolle stemming toonde dat de regering van mevrouw May gedoemd was. Hij verloor maar de telefoontjes gingen niet weg.

Brexiteers hebben zich de afgelopen dagen bij de eisen gevoegd terwijl het Parlement met de Brexit worstelt en te midden van de angsten onder de beloften die door beide hoofdpartijen zijn beloofd, de laatste verkiezingen zullen worden verbroken – met name bij het verlaten van de douane-unie en de interne markt.

Tory MP Andrew Bridgen wil dat mevrouw wordt vervangen door een Brexiteer. Hij gelooft dat het Remain Tories uit de partij zou duwen en vervolgens een snelle verkiezing zou toestaan ​​met meer Eurosceptische kandidaten die blauwe rozetten dragen.

Wat kan gebeuren?

Beide hoofdpartijen zullen een manifest moeten schrijven – inclusief een standpunt over de Brexit. Beide partijen zijn diep verdeeld – in veel gevallen tussen individuele parlementsleden en hun lokale activisten.

Onder mevrouw May proberen de Tories vermoedelijk met de deal te beginnen. But it is loathed by dozens of current Tory MPs who want a harder Brexit and hated even more by grassroots Tory members.

Shifting Tory policy on Brexit to the right would alienate the majority of current MPs who voted to Remain.

Labour has similar splits. Many of Labour's MPs and activists want Mr Corbyn to commit to putting Brexit to a second referendum – most with a view to cancelling it.

Mr Corbyn is a veteran Eurosceptic and millions of people who voted Leave in 2016 backed Labour in 2017.

The splits set the stage for a bitter and chaotic election. The outcome is highly unpredictable – the Tories start in front but are probably more divided on the main question facing the country.

Labour is behind but knows it made dramatic gains in the polls in the last election with its promises of vastly higher public spending.

Neither side can forecast what impact new political forces might wield over the election or how any public anger over the Brexit stalemate could play out.

It could swing the result in favour of one of the main parties or a new force.

Or an election campaign that takes months, costs millions of pounds could still end up in a hung Parliament and continued stalemate. This is the current forecast by polling expert Sir John Curtice.

Where's Angela? Awkward moment May walked up the red carpet alone after Merkel failed to greet her

There was an awkward moment for Theresa May as she arrived at the German Chancellery for talks with Angela Merkel – who failed to greet her.

Mrs Merkel traditionally meets important guests on the red carpet, but the Prime Minister was forced to walk down alone before entering the building.

The two leaders then re-emerged to shake hands for the cameras before disappearing again inside.

Mrs Merkel traditionally meets important guests on the red carpet, but the Prime Minister was forced to walk down alone before entering the building

Mrs Merkel traditionally meets important guests on the red carpet, but the Prime Minister was forced to walk down alone before entering the building

Mrs May after leaving her car

Mrs May after leaving her car

Mrs Merkel traditionally meets important guests on the red carpet, but the Prime Minister was forced to walk down alone before entering the building

A body language expert yesterday suggested that the two leaders were at odds over a Brexit extension.

Mrs May's hand clasp resembled a 'begging gesture' while both women cut 'grim' expressions.

Judi James said: 'It's the huge spatial gap between these two women that gives the suggestion of further separation rather than unity.

'Merkel in particular tends to keep both her allies and her enemies close but this pose suggests some desire to end the conversation.'

It was a different scene when Mrs May later headed to Paris to meet French President Emmanuel Macron, who greeted her with a hug and kisses on both cheeks.

The two leaders talk together on the terrace of the Chancellery in Berlin today

The two leaders talk together on the terrace of the Chancellery in Berlin today

The two leaders talk together on the terrace of the Chancellery in Berlin today

Tories' open revolt over delay: Almost 100 of them vote against move to put EU departure off to June 30

By John Stevens and Jack Doyle

Boris Johnson (pictured outside Parliament on April 8) was among Tories to vote against the motion to delay Brexit to June 30

Boris Johnson (pictured outside Parliament on April 8) was among Tories to vote against the motion to delay Brexit to June 30

Boris Johnson (pictured outside Parliament on April 8) was among Tories to vote against the motion to delay Brexit to June 30

Theresa May faced a mass rebellion by Tory MPs last night on a motion to delay Brexit to June 30 amid claims the UK was being turned into a 'laughing stock'.

Ninety-seven backbench Tories voted against the motion, including former Brexit secretary Dominic Raab and former foreign secretary Boris Johnson.

And it came as the Prime Minister also faced open revolt in the Cabinet with ministers Andrea Leadsom and Liam Fox publicly challenging her Brexit strategy.

In the Commons, and despite a three-line whip, almost 80 Tories were absent including several ministers, leaving just 131 to vote in favour of the motion.

No10 said there would be no disciplining of MPs who did not follow the party line. The Commons approved the motion on the extension request by 420 votes to 110, a majority of 310.

Former education minister Tim Loughton attacked 'saboteurs' on both sides for trying to 'hamstring' the Prime Minister.

He urged French president Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel to veto an extension and 'put us out of our misery now'.

'If the EU elections go ahead, it is highly likely the UK will elect an army of Nigel Farage mini-me's, who I am afraid will wreak havoc with the European Parliament and wreck your calculations about the balance of power within the EU.'

New Brexit vote 'within days' if Labour agree deal

Brexit legislation could be brought back to the Commons in days if the Government can reach a deal with Labour, ministers said last night.

Two government sources said that the discussions on the post were underway on the possibility of asking MPs to vote this week on the bill agreement in the hope of leaving the EU the following month.

Ministers also reserved the right to shorten the Easter holidays by asking MPs to sit next week on Monday and Tuesday if a deal seems to be close. On the basis of one proposal, the government would agree to allow free votes on important demands of the labor market, such as a customs union and a second referendum. If passed, these would then be incorporated into Theresa May's deal.

But a Whitehall source last night said the 'high-risk' strategy would only be considered if ministers were certain that Labour were signed up to it.

'The problem is that if you put the Withdrawal Bill in front of MPs and they vote it down then you have lost if for this session. You would have to prorogue Parliament to bring it back so it's pretty high-risk.'

Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell joined yesterday's talks between the two parties in Whitehall, including Chancellor Philip Hammond and environment minister Michael Gove. Mr McDonnell said Labor sought insurance that any agreement could not be overturned by a future Tory minister.

His comments reflect Labor's concern that a Brexiteer such as Boris Johnson could simply cancel any agreement if they become prime minister after Mrs. May resigns.

Mr McDonnell said: 'Some of the discussion that will take place will be about how any deal is secure for the long term and how best to secure that either through domestic legislation or treaty.' He expected the discussions would also cover alignment with the single market and environmental, consumer and workers' rights. Asked whether the Government was indicating it would back a customs union, Mr McDonnell said: 'Not yet – not even changes in language that I detect.' Further talks are due to take place tomorrow.

Meanwhile, an aide to Mr Hammond yesterday said he faced the sack for attending a People's Vote rally where he called for a second referendum. In defiance of the whips, Huw Merriman told the Westminster rally: 'I am determined to play my part – if that means I use my voice and get fired for it then so be it.'

As Mrs May flew to Berlin for talks yesterday, Commons Leader Mrs Leadsom urged her to ask Mrs Merkel to reopen the Withdrawal Agreement forged last November.

Even though the Prime Minister has long given up attempts at changes as the EU has repeatedly ruled them out, Mrs Leadsom raised the prospect she should still be pushing for them.

Speaking outside her London home, she told ITV News: 'The Prime Minister is off to see Angela Merkel today and it would be fantastic if Angela Merkel will try to support a proper UK Brexit by agreeing to reopen the Withdrawal Agreement.

'There have been rumours over the weekend some senior members of the German government would be willing to do that in order to get Theresa May's deal over the line.

'As the person with the responsibility to get the legislation through, if we get the Prime Minister's deal over the line because the EU has decided to support measures on the backstop, that would be the best possible outcome.'

But Mrs May's official spokesman dismissed the idea, telling reporters: 'Any plan going forward would be based on the current Withdrawal Agreement.'

There were also signs of resistance in the Cabinet to compromise with Labour, with International Trade Secretary Mr Fox warning that a customs union would leave the UK 'stuck in the worst of both worlds'.

In a four-page letter to the 1922 committee of backbench Tory MPs, he explained how the scenario would see the UK 'on the menu' without any control. He said: 'We would be stuck in the worst of both worlds, not only unable to set our own international trade policy, but subject, without representation, to the policy of an entity over which MPs would have no democratic control.'

He went on: 'In such a scenario the UK would have a new role in the global trading system – we ourselves would be traded. As the famous saying in Brussels goes, if you are not at the table, you are on the menu.'

DUP party leader Arlene Foster and Westminster leader Nigel Dodds both accused Mrs May of 'begging' European leaders for help to break the impasse.

'The talks between the Prime Minister and the leaders of France and Germany is humiliating and embarrassing for the UK,' Mr Dodds said last night.

DUP party leader Arlene Foster and Westminster leader Nigel Dodds (pictured in Belfast on February 8) accused Mrs May of ‘begging’ European leaders for help to break the impasse

DUP party leader Arlene Foster and Westminster leader Nigel Dodds (pictured in Belfast on February 8) accused Mrs May of ‘begging’ European leaders for help to break the impasse

DUP party leader Arlene Foster and Westminster leader Nigel Dodds (pictured in Belfast on February 8) accused Mrs May of 'begging' European leaders for help to break the impasse

'The problems the Prime Minister is attempting to solve were not created by the decision to leave the EU, rather the ineffective negotiations by the Prime Minister to implement that decision.'

Earlier, Mrs Foster questioned Mrs May's leadership qualities. 'She needed to be strong, she needed to show leadership, and I'm sorry to say that hasn't been evident in these past couple of months,' she told the BBC.

The Conservative Party 'will vanish' if it doesn't appeal to the young, say three senior MPs

Three senior Tories in their 40s brandished their youth appeal yesterday as they pitched to be the 'next generation' leader to succeed Theresa May.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock, 40, International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt, 46, and Foreign Affairs committee chairman Tom Tugendhat, 45, are all expected to run for PM when Theresa May steps down.

All three have endorsed a report which warned the Conservative Party faces an 'existential' crisis unless it appeals to the young.

Foreign Affairs committee chairman Tom Tugendhat, International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt and Health Secretary Matt Hancock today urged the Tory Party to appeal to the young as they launched a think-tank report

Foreign Affairs committee chairman Tom Tugendhat, International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt and Health Secretary Matt Hancock today urged the Tory Party to appeal to the young as they launched a think-tank report

Foreign Affairs committee chairman Tom Tugendhat, International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt and Health Secretary Matt Hancock today urged the Tory Party to appeal to the young as they launched a think-tank report

The report by think-tank Onward found the 'tipping point' at which voters are more likely to vote Conservative is now 51, up from 47 at the last election.

Speaking at the report's launch in Westminster, Mr Hancock warned Tory voters are getting older and back the party 'when they get their first Winter Fuel Allowance' – not when they 'get their first pay cheque'.

Mr Hancock, a former Bank of England economist, yesterday set out the case for 'Caring Conservatism', saying: 'Enough about being just comfortable with modern Britain, we need to be champions of modern Britain.We need to champion a Britain that is positive and optimistic and gregarious and outward-facing and community-building and inclusive, and perhaps above all, caring.'

Previously seen as a rank outsider, Mr Hancock's odds of winning have shortened markedly in recent weeks.

A former chief of staff to George Osborne, he won the West Suffolk seat in 2010 and has been a minister since 2013.

Mr Tugendhat, a former intelligence officer in the British Army, told the event the next leader should be someone under 50.

Calling for more focus on technical education and cheaper childcare, Mr Tugendhat said: 'We need to look like the people who people want to associate with. And if we don't get that right we will be in real trouble.'

Miss Mordaunt said Onward's report was a 'kick up the a***' for the Tories. The MP for Portsmouth North worked in business and public relations before entering Parliament and rising up the ministerial ranks.

The 'Generation Why' report, based on polling by Hanbury Strategy, found 16 per cent of under-35s would vote Conservative. Just 17 per cent of Tory voters are under 45, and only 4 per cent under 25.