President Assad's uncle will stand trial in France against money laundering

President Assad's uncle will stand trial in France, accused of using Syrian state funds to build a $ 100 million property

  • Rifaat al-Assad will stand trial against money laundering fees, which he denies
  • The real estate of the 81-year-old owns a castle and stud farm near Paris
  • The former Syrian vice president fled from his homeland after a failed coup against his brother Hafeez al-Assad, the father of the current president Bashar al-Assad

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's uncle will stand trial in France against money laundering.

Rifat al-Assad is accused of using funds from the treasury of Syria to build an empire of $ 100 million.

French officials have ordered him to stand trial for organized money laundering, although a date has not yet been set.

The former vice president of Syria, now 81, has denied the allegations, claiming that they are from & # 39; long-standing political opponents & # 39; came.

Rifat al-Assad (photo) is accused of using funds from the treasury of Syria to build an empire of $ 100 million

Rifaat is the brother of Hafez al-Assad, the father of the current president Bashar (photo)

Rifaat is the brother of Hafez al-Assad, the father of the current president Bashar (photo)

Rifat al-Assad (left), the uncle of President Bashar al-Assad (right) is accused of using funds from the treasury of Syria to build a $ 100 million empire

His reported French fortune includes two mansions in Paris, a stud farm and a castle near the French capital and 79,000 square feet of office space in Lyon.

The 81-year-old former politician has been investigated by the French authorities since April 2014.

Reef left Syria in 1984 after setting up a failed coup against his brother Hafez al-Assad, the father of Bashar, who led Syria from 1971 to 2000.

He also became the & # 39; butcher of Hama & # 39; mentioned because he allegedly commanded the troops behind the bloody suppression of an uprising in central Syria.

As the head of an elite force, he launched a Sunni uprising in February 1982, a crackdown that was estimated to have produced between 10,000 and 40,000 lives.

After he arrived in Europe, his lush lifestyle, four women and sixteen children soon raised eyebrows.

He and his family also own more than 500 houses in Spain, which were seized by the authorities in 2017.

The reef, depicted in 2000, left Syria in 1984 after setting up a failed coup against his brother Hafez al-Assad, the father of current President Bashar al-Assad

The reef, depicted in 2000, left Syria in 1984 after setting up a failed coup against his brother Hafez al-Assad, the father of current President Bashar al-Assad

The reef, depicted in 2000, left Syria in 1984 after setting up a failed coup against his brother Hafez al-Assad, the father of current President Bashar al-Assad

The assets of his family, described by the French customs in a report from May 2014, are estimated at around € 90 million ($ 102 million or £ 78 million).

A large part of the real estate empire is said to be held through a web of companies in Luxembourg.

Rifaat has claimed that he owes his fortune to the generosity of Saudi King Abdullah, who died in January 2015.

But the French prosecutors believe that much of the money comes from the treasury of Syria.

A former Syrian minister claimed that Hafez al-Assad had paid around $ 300 million to his brother in 1984 as a way to get rid of him after the coup attempt.

The case is the latest in a series of cases brought in France against the families of foreign autocrats.

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