Prehistoric URINE reveals that 10,000 years ago neolithic people made the switch from hunting to hats

Mankind made the transition from hunting to hats 10,000 years ago, according to a new study that looked at prehistoric urine.

It is thought that this was the first time urine was used to date an archaeological site.

The research is also believed to be the & # 39; crucial turning point in the history of humanity & # 39; when the world population became animal shepherds.

It is currently not possible to distinguish the urinary salts of humans from those of cattle, but the researchers hope to refine the technology that they will soon be able to.

Researchers say that it is still a reliable measure of society in the region around 8000 BC. Because it displays the population size and density.

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Study authors Jay Quade (left) and Jordan Abell (right) looking for urine samples on the site of an ancient Turkish settlement where salts left by animal and human urine provide clues about the development of human society

Study authors Jay Quade (left) and Jordan Abell (right) looking for urine samples on the site of an ancient Turkish settlement where salts left by animal and human urine provide clues about the development of human society

The study, led by Columbia University experts, followed the human population in the region for over 1,000 years.

A total of 113 samples of nitrate, sodium and chlorine were analyzed from the site of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey, which are usually emitted in animal waste.

These monsters revealed an increase in the number of people, sheep and goats around 8,000 BC.

The research uses the abundance of urinary salts over time to follow the growth of the community in a world first.

& # 39; This is the first time, as far as we know, that people have picked up salts in archaeological material and used them in a way to look at animal management development & # 39 ;, says lead author Jordan Abell, a graduate student at Columbia & # 39; s Lamont. -Doherty Earth Observatory.

& # 39; And we thought that people and animals pee and when they pee, they release a lot of salt & # 39 ;, says Mr. Abell.

& # 39; In a dry place like this, we didn't think salts would be washed away and redistributed. & # 39;

The oldest ones on the site that had some evidence of human habitation date from 10,400 years.

For 40 years, only a slight increase in urine concentration was detected for a sudden peak of 300 years, the researchers discovered.

The timing is close to what the authors of the study expected to see, but according to them, the sharp rise in the population around 10,000 years ago could be a faster transition than previously thought.

Analysis of the archaeologist's team, published in the journal Science Advances.

Salts from this period appeared in concentrations up to 1000 times greater than the previous era, indicating a boom in the perimeter of residents – both animals and humans.

They calculated that about 10,000 years ago the density of people and animals went from almost zero to about one person or animal for every 100 square feet (10 square meters).

View from the roofs of reconstructed houses from the 8th and 9th centuries BC. A total of 113 samples were analyzed from the site of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey and revealed an increase in the number of people, sheep and goats around 8,000 BC.

View from the roofs of reconstructed houses from the 8th and 9th centuries BC. A total of 113 samples were analyzed from the site of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey and revealed an increase in the number of people, sheep and goats around 8,000 BC.

View from the roofs of reconstructed houses from the 8th and 9th centuries BC. A total of 113 samples were analyzed from the site of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey and revealed an increase in the number of people, sheep and goats around 8,000 BC.

Students working on the western part of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey, where the evidence was found. The oldest ones on the site that had some evidence of human habitation date from 10,400 years. For 40 years only a slight increase in urine concentration was detected for a sudden peak of 300 years, the researchers discovered

Students working on the western part of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey, where the evidence was found. The oldest ones on the site that had some evidence of human habitation date from 10,400 years. For 40 years only a slight increase in urine concentration was detected for a sudden peak of 300 years, the researchers discovered

Students working on the western part of Aşıklı Höyük in central Turkey, where the evidence was found. The oldest ones on the site that had some evidence of human habitation date from 10,400 years. For 40 years only a slight increase in urine concentration was detected for a sudden peak of 300 years, the researchers discovered

Evidence from the site in Turkey suggests that people around 8,450 BC. Sheep and goats started domesticating. Not enough buildings on site from the period to accommodate all people, so some of the urinary plates were from animals

Evidence from the site in Turkey suggests that people around 8,450 BC. Sheep and goats started domesticating. Not enough buildings on site from the period to accommodate all people, so some of the urinary plates were from animals

Evidence from the site in Turkey suggests that people around 8,450 BC. Sheep and goats started domesticating. Not enough buildings on site from the period to accommodate all people, so some of the urinary plates were from animals

Evidence from the site suggests that people around 8,450 BC. Sheep and goats started domesticating.

These practices evolved over the next 1,000 years, until society became heavily dependent on beasts for food and other materials.

An average of 1,790 people and animals lived – and urinated – on the settlement every day of the 100-year anniversary assessed in the study.

They believe the urinary salts belong to a combination of humans and animals, because the other evidence on the site shows that many people would not have been able to fit in the buildings that were probably on land.

This indicates that the urine salt concentrations can indeed reflect the relative amounts of domestic animals over time.

Researchers hope one day to be bale to separate the urine salt samples from animals and humans and use the technique to study other areas where physical archaeological remains such as bones or buildings do not exist.

Anthropologist and co-author Mary Stiner of the University of Arizona said the method could clarify the relationship between humans and animals during this period.

& # 39; We can find similar trends in other archaeological sites in the Middle East period & # 39 ;, she said.

& # 39; But it is also possible that only a handful of long-lived communities were forums for the developing relationships between people and goats in a certain region of the Middle East. & # 39;

WHEN HAS MAN DONE THE FARM?

It is well known that agriculture and the development of agricultural skills enabled people to move from hunter-gatherers to a functioning society.

Many tools have been found that are thousands of years old, but the earliest recorded evidence of the switch may have been Turkey.

Urine sample analysis found an increase in population and density 10,000 years ago.

The oldest ones on the site that had some evidence of human habitation date from 10,400 years.

For 40 years, only a slight increase in urine concentration was detected for a sudden peak of 300 years, the researchers discovered.