Pregnant women infected with COVID-19 are twice as likely to have a stillbirth

Pregnant women are at increased risk for serious complications from COVID-19, and they have only risen during the Delta variant wave, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed.

Reports published Friday by the agency showed that the number of pregnant women who died from COVID-19 during the period when the Delta variant was the dominant strain of the country increased fivefold.

Pre-Delta, five in 1,000 pregnant women who contracted the virus during pregnancy died, compared to a whopping 25 in 1,000 during the Delta period.

The researchers also found that pregnant women who were infected at the time of birth were twice as likely to have a stillbirth.

Pregnant women were five times more likely to die from COVID-19, while the Delta variant was the dominant strain than in the previous months of the pandemic

Pregnant women infected with COVID-19 during labor are twice as likely to have a stillbirth than uninfected women, CDC report finds

Pregnant women infected with COVID-19 during labor are twice as likely to have a stillbirth than uninfected women, CDC report finds

The CDC team analyzed pregnancy mortality data from Mississippi from March 2020 to October 2021 for one of them reports.

They found 15 deaths related to Covid among pregnant women in the state during the 19-month period, out of 1,637 total infections recorded.

In the pre-Delta period, from March 2020 to June 2021, six deaths were reported among pregnant women – or five in 1,000 infections.

The number increased rapidly during the Delta period, from July to October 2021, with nine deaths among pregnant women — or 25 per 1,000 infections.

Of the 15 women who died, 14 had an underlying medical condition that put them at even greater risk of complications from the virus.

None of them were fully vaccinated and only one was at least partially vaccinated.

Three died during their pregnancy, leading to two stillbirths and one spontaneous abortion.

Seven of the women required emergency C-section for their unborn child to survive, and 12 women died shortly after giving birth.

Twelve of the women were black or Hispanic, with an emphasis on already disproportionate maternal death rates in the US

a separate report published Friday afternoon by the CDC examined the number of stillbirths in pregnant women who were infected at the time of delivery.

The researchers collected data from 1.2 million births across the country from March 2020 to June 2021.

Stillbirths, when a baby is dead at birth, are very rare and only occur in 0.65 percent of women who are not infected with Covid.

Within the dataset, 21,653 women gave birth while infected with COVID-19.

Those women were twice as likely to have a stillbirth, with 273 — or 1.26 percent — of the babies not surviving.

They were more common in the Delta period, with 2.7 percent of women who gave birth while infected had a stillbirth from July to September 2021 — a fourfold increase from the 0.63 percent figure posted by uninfected women.

Researchers are encouraging more pregnant women to get the COVID-19 vaccine to avoid the negative health outcomes in their findings.  Currently, only 35% of pregnant women are fully vaccinated, far behind the national rate.  Pictured: A pregnant woman in Saint Petersburg, Russia, receives an injection of a COVID-19 vaccine

Researchers are encouraging more pregnant women to get the COVID-19 vaccine to avoid the negative health outcomes in their findings. Currently, only 35% of pregnant women are fully vaccinated, far behind the national rate. Pictured: A pregnant woman in Saint Petersburg, Russia, receives an injection of a COVID-19 vaccine

Infected women suffering from hypertension, an adverse cardiac event or requiring a ventilator because of Covid were most likely to have a stillbirth.

The researchers write that these data make vaccination against Covid even more important for pregnant women.

“Implementing evidence-based COVID-19 prevention strategies, including vaccination before or during pregnancy, is critical to reducing the impact of COVID-19 on stillbirths,” researchers wrote.

Pregnant women are one of the least vaccinated populations in the United States, with only 35 percent fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

By comparison, nearly 70 percent of American adults are fully vaccinated.

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