Advertisements
Anne Jensen, 23, from Denmark, decided three years ago to search the internet for alternative diets when after almost ten years of vegetarianism & # 39; bizarre symptoms & # 39; started to get

An expectant mother who only eats raw fruits and vegetables has claimed that her fruity regime is the & # 39; healthiest choice & # 39; is – and she wants to raise her child with the same extreme diet.

Advertisements

Anne Jensen, 23, decided three years ago to search the internet for an alternative diet when, after almost ten years of vegetarianism, she experienced "bizarre symptoms". including muscle cramps and hair loss.

The expectant mother, who lives in Denmark with her friend Grant Painter, then came across a number of YouTube videos showing the benefits of a fruitair or & # 39; raw vegan & # 39; diet explained.

Followers of the regime only eat uncooked fruits and vegetables, and after extensive research, Anne decided to try it.

Anne Jensen, 23, from Denmark, decided three years ago to search the internet for alternative diets when after almost ten years of vegetarianism & # 39; bizarre symptoms & # 39; started to get

Anne Jensen, 23, from Denmark, decided three years ago to search the internet for alternative diets when after almost ten years of vegetarianism & # 39; bizarre symptoms & # 39; started to get

Anne, who is now 25 weeks pregnant with her first child, claims that the unusual diet gives her so much energy that she could run a half marathon and barely sweat.

Advertisements

She said: & # 39; I ate a lot before that, but it wasn't the right fuel. Most of my friends are also fruitarian and agree that this is the healthiest choice, and my loved ones are very supportive.

& # 39; But people online, who don't understand the raw vegan diet, have been critical and said that during pregnancy I should drink cow's milk to give my baby everything he needs.

& # 39; However, I believe that the milk from cows for babies is & # 39; s from cows and that people can get all the nutrients they need from plants. & # 39;

The expectant mother (pictured during pregnancy) then came across a number of YouTube videos & # 39; s showing the benefits of a fruitair or & # 39; raw vegan & # 39; diet

The expectant mother (pictured during pregnancy) then came across a number of YouTube videos & # 39; s showing the benefits of a fruitair or & # 39; raw vegan & # 39; diet

The expectant mother (pictured during pregnancy) then came across a number of YouTube videos & # 39; s showing the benefits of a fruitair or & # 39; raw vegan & # 39; diet

Anne, however, admitted that she had to introduce some cooked vegan meals to her diet to combat the nausea she suffers during her pregnancy.

But once her baby is born, she plans to return to a 100% raw vegan diet plan – and hopes to raise her baby on the same regime.

Advertisements

& # 39; At the moment I'm mainly fruit-based, but I do eat a strange cooked meal, because it seems to help with nausea, I'm not sure why, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; But when I give birth, I would like to return to a full fruitiers diet and hope that my child will do the same – but I just have to wait and see. & # 39;

Anne, who returned to Denmark in March after traveling all over from Australia to Thailand, followed a standard diet until she was 12 years old.

Followers of the fruitarian regime eat only uncooked fruit and vegetables, and after extensive research, Anne decided to try it

Followers of the fruitarian regime eat only uncooked fruit and vegetables, and after extensive research, Anne decided to try it

Followers of the fruitarian regime eat only uncooked fruit and vegetables, and after extensive research, Anne decided to try it

Anne admitted that she had to introduce some cooked vegan meals to her diet to combat the nausea she suffers during her pregnancy (Photo: Anne and her partner Grant Painter)
Advertisements

Anne admitted that she had to introduce some cooked vegan meals to her diet to combat the nausea she suffers during her pregnancy (Photo: Anne and her partner Grant Painter)

Anne admitted that she had to introduce some cooked vegan meals to her diet to combat the nausea she suffers during her pregnancy (Photo: Anne and her partner Grant Painter)

Then she decided to fit in & # 39; & # 39; to dump meat with her school friends, most of whom were vegetarian.

She explained: & # 39; Initially I became a vegetarian to be part of the group. I used to be a fussy eater and I didn't like many foods. However, once I became a vegetarian, I noticed that I ate more and more and realized that I wasn't really picky, I just didn't like meat.

WHAT IS A FRUITARY DIET?

The fruit-based diet – or raw vegan diet – is a restrictive regime whereby you omit all meat and dairy and only consume raw fruit and vegetables.

Advertisements

It is adjusted differently by each follower, but most ensure that between 55 and 75 percent of their diet consists exclusively of raw fruit.

Others add nuts, seeds and grains.

Although the diet consists largely of fruit, some add tomatoes, avocado, cucumber and peppers to their meals.

The very restrictive diet offers many vitamins, minerals and protective antioxidants.

But fruit also contains the natural sugar fructose, which in some people can lead to abdominal pain, diarrhea and bloating.

Advertisements

Source: BBC Good Food

& # 39; As I grew older and read about the ethical, animal rights side of being a vegetarian, that was of course also an important factor. & # 39;

For years Anne followed her meat-free diet without any problems. When she was 19, she moved to France to work as an au pair and soon began to develop bizarre health problems.

She explained: “I lived there with a family and ate what they ate, which was different from my diet at home – lots of cheese, lots of cream, and lots of processed food.

& # 39; I think my body just can't handle it. I started getting all kinds of health problems. My muscles would shake, my hair would fall out and I would feel so tired and slow. & # 39;

Anne was fed up and searched the internet for answers and came across a number of YouTube videos, in which people talked about how they found fruity diets to be beneficial.

Anne added: & Something in my head clicked that the healthiest way to live was to eat fruits and vegetables – the most natural things in the world.

& # 39; I have not commented on it. I spent about a year researching, reading various studies, and articles. I wanted to be sure that I could stick to my new diet and that it would give me everything I needed in terms of nutrition.

& # 39; I was worried about things like sugar, because people kept saying how sugary fruit was. However, the way I understand it is that the sugar in fruit is completely different from the processed type. That really reassured me. & # 39;

As a fruitarian, Anne's diet depends on what is in season and where she is in the world

As a fruitarian, Anne's diet depends on what is in season and where she is in the world

Advertisements

As a fruitarian, Anne's diet depends on what is in season and where she is in the world

She usually eats three melons for breakfast, followed by a smoothie for lunch and a fresh salad for dinner

She usually eats three melons for breakfast, followed by a smoothie for lunch and a fresh salad for dinner

She usually eats three melons for breakfast, followed by a smoothie for lunch and a fresh salad for dinner

Three years ago, when she was 20, Anne decided to officially become a fruitair and said she soon saw a difference, especially in her energy levels.

She continued: & # 39; It was really an easy transition. I honestly did not miss my old diet. My muscle vibrations and hair loss soon stopped and I suddenly had so much energy. I woke up at 5 o'clock in the morning and started running, with no recovery time afterwards.

Advertisements

& # 39; I could run a half marathon and feel absolutely good the next day. It didn't take long, I drove 10 km every morning, just as a way to use some of my extra energy.

& # 39; I also noticed that things like headache and menstrual cramps, which I had experienced before without realizing, had disappeared. It is all these things that you do not realize that they had influenced you until they stopped. & # 39;

A TYPICAL DAY FOR ANNE

Breakfast: A & # 39; monomeal & # 39; – that consists of only one type of raw fruit or vegetable – such as three melons, or half a large watermelon.

Lunch: A smoothie, with one of her favorite recipes where five bananas are mixed with about 10 dates, fresh berries and water.

Dinner: A fresh salad consisting of spinach, two Roman lettuce heads and tomatoes, as well as a mango, orange and strawberry juice.

Pictured: a typical meal for Anne and Grant
Advertisements

Pictured: a typical meal for Anne and Grant

Pictured: a typical meal for Anne and Grant

At the beginning of the year, Anne was overjoyed to discover that she and Grant, 22, were expecting a baby.

& # 39; From the outset it was my intention to stick to my fruit food for as long as possible & # 39 ;, she said about her pregnancy.

She did exactly that for four months, but recently she finds that her nausea has gotten worse, so she has adjusted her diet somewhat with the uncooked vegan meal.

And although she struggles with morning sickness, she is convinced that being fruity has kept her energy level high while she is preparing to give birth to her child.

Once she has given birth, Anne plans to listen to her body to find out what kind of diet is best for her, but hopes she can return to fruitarianism full-time.

& # 39; I'd like to raise my child as a fruitarian, but I can't if I don't follow the diet myself, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; I intend to breastfeed as long as the baby wants. I know this is the main source of calories for the baby and will slowly introduce food next to it. I'll just wait and see what's best for my baby. & # 39;

By speaking out, Anne hopes to encourage others to consider a fruit-rich diet, and is convinced that it has improved her health tenfold. Not only that, but she is also passionate about the environmental benefits.

& # 39; Nothing that I eat is in plastic packaging, and there is very little waste, & # 39; she said. & # 39; I think it's better if the planet is fruitair. & # 39;

& # 39; You also save a lot of money because you don't buy delicacies such as takeaway meals, meals or even a chocolate bar and a can of coke. Once you get past your old eating habits, it is really very easy to stick to it.

& # 39; I believe your body will only crave what you put in, so if you don't eat junk food, it doesn't want junk food. If you are not 100% passionate, it may seem easy to fall back to your old ways, but you only have to remind yourself why you are doing this and how it is best for your body. & # 39;

Anne, who discovered that she and Grant were expecting at the start of the year, said that she would & # 39; would like to raise her child as a fruit holder & # 39;

Anne, who discovered that she and Grant were expecting at the start of the year, said that she would & # 39; would like to raise her child as a fruit holder & # 39;

Anne, who discovered that she and Grant were expecting at the start of the year, said that she would & # 39; would like to raise her child as a fruit holder & # 39;

Dr. Daniel Atkinson, Clinical Lead of Treated.com, said the & # 39; biggest problem & # 39; with the fruitarian diet, how & # 39; restrictive & # 39; it's because it's not a & # 39; important nutrient & # 39; contains that you can only get from animals.

"Although whole fruit is healthy, fruit juice often has a high sugar concentration, and consuming many of them can increase the risk of gestational diabetes," he said.

& # 39; Anemia is a common problem during pregnancy, and a fruit-heavy diet is not rich in iron, which may mean that you are more at risk of developing anemia. If you are pregnant, it is better to talk to your doctor or health visitor before drastically changing your diet. & # 39;

Speaking about the impact that a fruit nutrition diet can have on a child, Dr. continued. Atkinson: & # 39; Research shows that infant and toddler nutrition has a major impact on their growth and development.

& # 39; By far the greatest impact on children's health is breastfeeding, but it has recently been shown that a variety of foods introduced after weaning can help the types of & # 39; to affect friendly & # 39; bacteria that develop in the gut.

& # 39; These in turn can make a difference in the way we, as adults, metabolize carbohydrates. A fruity diet may seem attractive to parents and children in the early years – many find it easier for children to eat juicy peaches and strawberries than vegetables – but the relatively high sugar content of fruit means they may increase the risk of diabetes later in life. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) femail