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Preeya Alexander (photo), a Melbourne physician who visits The Wholesome Doctor on Instagram, said there are six important things everyone should do for a good night's sleep

A doctor's guide for a good night's sleep: the doctor reveals her ultimate recipe for good quality rest – and urges everyone to avoid caffeine after fourteen

  • As the weather gets warmer, many struggle with sleepless nights
  • To help you keep a close eye on, Dr. Preeya Alexander shared sleeping tricks
  • She has completed the six things that everyone must do to get a good rest eye
  • Things include removing clocks from the bedroom and following a & # 39; ritual & # 39; before bedtime
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An Australian doctor has revealed what she prescribes to all her patients when they struggle with sleep – and it's much easier than you might think.

Preeya Alexander, a Melbourne physician who visits The Wholesome Doctor on Instagram, said there are six important things everyone should do for a good night's sleep.

From removing caffeinated drinks after fourteen to removing all clocks from the bedroom, her simple tricks are suitable for all ages and lifestyles.

Preeya Alexander (photo), a Melbourne physician who visits The Wholesome Doctor on Instagram, said there are six important things everyone should do for a good night's sleep

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Preeya Alexander (photo), a Melbourne physician who visits The Wholesome Doctor on Instagram, said there are six important things everyone should do for a good night's sleep

The six things to do to get a good night's sleep

1. No screens for an hour before bedtime

2. Avoid caffeine after fourteen

3. Develop a one-hour ritual before bedtime

4. Remove all clocks from the bedroom

5. Take a 30-minute walk in sunlight

6. Try meditation at night

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Dr. Alexander said that sleeping problems are usually caused by stress, anxiety or depression.

& # 39; When we are stressed or anxious sleep quality is often affected – people may have difficulty falling asleep or often wake up & # 39; restless and anxious at night, & she said.

She said that one thing you should practice to give yourself the best chance to doze off is to use technology for at least an hour before bedtime.

& # 39; No screens for bedtime for an hour – exposure to blue light blocks the production of the sleep hormone melatonin. Patients often do not take this, so I continue to prescribe it. Turn off the TV and telephone, & said Dr. Alexander.

If you like coffee or soft drinks, she advised avoiding all caffeine after fourteen.

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& # 39; Aim for no more than two caffeinated drinks per day, & # 39; she said.

The Melbourne GP is known as the Wholesome Doctor on social media

The Melbourne GP is known as the Wholesome Doctor on social media

The Melbourne GP is known as the Wholesome Doctor on social media

Don't watch the clock! She urged restless sleepers to remove clocks from the bedroom to prevent them from being anxious about the time & # 39; were (stock image)

Don't watch the clock! She urged restless sleepers to remove clocks from the bedroom to prevent them from being anxious about the time & # 39; were (stock image)

Don't watch the clock! She urged restless sleepers to remove clocks from the bedroom to prevent them from being anxious about the time & # 39; were (stock image)

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Dr. Alexander encourages her patients to have a & # 39; ritual & # 39; every night before bedtime. to keep.

& # 39; Try to develop a regular one-hour settlement ritual before going to sleep. My ritual is a hot shower, read a book and then bed, & she said.

& # 39; I tell my patients to become essentially a toddler – train the brain to know that when the ritual begins, bedtime and sleep time comes. & # 39;

She urged restless sleepers to remove all clocks from their bedrooms to prevent them from worrying about time.

& # 39; Don't look at the clock, & # 39; she said.

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Dr. Alexander said that a 30-minute walk in sunlight during the day can make sleep quality help at night.

If you find yourself stressed or anxious, she said that meditation can relax the brain.

& # 39; Making stress myself, I do sleep hygiene most nights to relax. If you're having a hard time, this stuff doesn't work overnight, you have to persist, train the brain, and as I say to my patients – "become a toddler."

& # 39; Good luck – sleeping problems are common and can really affect your mood. If you need help, chat with your doctor. & # 39;

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