Postie’s scarlet uniform shows the wild pheasant red

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Not very pheasant! Postie’s scarlet uniform shows the wild bird red when he attacks him repeatedly in his village

  • The male pheasant hated mailman Kevin Keeler, 47
  • Bird apparently became enraged by his bright red Royal Mail uniform and van
  • Mr. Keeler said, “I think he’s just territorial. He has become a major nuisance ‘

A mailman lives in fear because he is constantly attacked by a fiery pheasant during his round in a Norfolk village.

The male bird hated Kevin Keeler, 47, after apparently enraged by his bright red Royal Mail uniform and van.

The pheasant flies at him repeatedly, knocks letters from his hand and sometimes sucks blood by pecking and clawing his legs at High Green in Brooke near Norwich.

A mailman lives in fear because he's constantly attacked by a fiery pheasant on his rounds in a Norfolk village

A mailman lives in fear because he’s constantly attacked by a fiery pheasant on his rounds in a Norfolk village

The male bird hated Kevin Keeler, 47, after apparently enraged by his bright red Royal Mail uniform and van

The male bird hated Kevin Keeler, 47, after apparently enraged by his bright red Royal Mail uniform and van

The male bird hated Kevin Keeler, 47, after apparently enraged by his bright red Royal Mail uniform and van

Mr. Keeler said, “I think he’s just territorial. He has now become a major nuisance as I see him most days. He is always waiting for me at some part of the lap.

‘It can be very painful when he stakes me. His beak is very sharp and he bleed my leg. It makes my tour quite a scary experience.

He gets furious when he sees me pull up in my van and he’s waiting for me when I come out. He will circle around me and then run to my ankles.

He dives for them and I have to jump out of the way, but now he’s started flying at me and trying to take a bite out of my legs.

He knocked the letters out of my hand about four weeks ago, and they got absolutely soaked because it had rained. A man came by to get him away from me.

Mr. Keeler said, “I think he's just territorial.  He has now become a major nuisance as I see him most days.  He is always waiting for me for some part of the lap '

Mr. Keeler said, “I think he's just territorial.  He has now become a major nuisance as I see him most days.  He is always waiting for me for some part of the lap '

Mr. Keeler said, “I think he’s just territorial. He has now become a major nuisance as I see him most days. He is always waiting for me for some part of the lap ‘

“I don’t want to hurt him, but I have to kick him away a little bit. I am often happy to carry my bag as it provides some protection.

“He’s never going to back down and eventually chases me until I can get in my van and I’m safe – but then he’ll chase me down the road until I’m gone.”

Mr. Keeler from Hempnall, Norfolk, has now nicknamed the bird Mr. Angry because of his bad temper.

The pheasant started attacking him during the snow in February and now targeted him almost every day during his morning round in Brooke

He said, ‘I saw him sitting on a lawn and went to take a picture of him – but he ran up to me and started pecking me around the ankles. I had to hit him with a package to get him off me.

Then he started doing the same thing almost every day. It got worse when he started to pounce.

‘I wear leggings on cold days that provide some protection, but they actually bleed when I only had my shorts on in warm weather.

“I’ve been a mailman for twenty years and in my time I’ve been bitten by three dogs – but this is the first time a pheasant has tried me.

Mr Keeler from Hempnall, Norfolk has now nicknamed the bird Mr Angry for being in such a bad mood

Mr Keeler from Hempnall, Norfolk has now nicknamed the bird Mr Angry for being in such a bad mood

Mr Keeler from Hempnall, Norfolk has now nicknamed the bird Mr Angry for being in such a bad mood

In any case, dogs are often locked in or behind a fence so you can decide whether to approach them.

‘But this pheasant just emerges from a hedge without warning. He picks me up, but I’ve seen him intimidate other people too, and he’s even adopted a few dogs.

‘He’s chasing cars and it’s surprising he hasn’t been killed by traffic – but he’s not scared.

When he starts making a squeak and blows himself up, you know he’s getting really angry. Every time I see a pheasant now, I jump on it and my heart pounds a little. ‘

Retired chartered accountant Maurcie Land, 70, from Brooke, said: ‘The pheasant is often in my driveway and I have to fend it off.

‘You open the car door and he’s there, following you around. It’s pretty intimidating. The other day I was gardening and had to use a plastic bucket to push it away. ‘

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