Postcard Sent Home By Titanic Hero And Autographed ‘Love Jack’ Set To Raise $ 15,000 At Auction

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A postcard written by a Titanic hero to his sister and signed ‘Love Jack’ just weeks before he died in the disaster will fetch $ 15,000 at auction this month.

Senior cell phone operator Jack Phillips, then 24, wrote the postcard depicting the famous ship 109 years ago on March 7, 1912, to his sister Elsie Phillips in Woking, Surrey.

He sent the postcard to Elsie from Belfast, just five weeks before the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York.

Jack, who shares the same first name as the fictional character played by Leonardo DiCaprio in the 1997 Oscar-winning film Titanic, wrote the message on the back of the glossy postcard.

The postcard showed the White Star Line Titanic on the day of its launch in Belfast on May 31, 1911.

Senior cell phone operator Jack Phillips, then 24, wrote the postcard depicting the famous ship 109 years ago on March 7, 1912 to his sister Elsie Phillips

Senior cell phone operator Jack Phillips, then 24, wrote the postcard depicting the famous ship 109 years ago on March 7, 1912 to his sister Elsie Phillips

He sent the postcard to Elsie from Belfast, Ireland, just five weeks before the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, having been sent to New York from Southampton in the United Kingdom five days earlier.  He signed it with 'Love Jack'

He sent the postcard to Elsie from Belfast, Ireland, just five weeks before the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, having been sent to New York from Southampton in the United Kingdom five days earlier.  He signed it with 'Love Jack'

He sent the postcard to Elsie from Belfast, Ireland, just five weeks before the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, having been sent to New York from Southampton in the United Kingdom five days earlier. He signed it with ‘Love Jack’

While the liner was sinking, Jack, who turned 25 on board the ship, worked tirelessly to send wireless SOS signals to other ships to enlist their help in the rescue of the Titanic's passengers and crew.

While the liner was sinking, Jack, who turned 25 on board the ship, worked tirelessly to send wireless SOS signals to other ships to enlist their help in the rescue of the Titanic's passengers and crew.

While the liner was sinking, Jack, who turned 25 on board the ship, worked tirelessly to send wireless SOS signals to other ships to enlist their help in the rescue of the Titanic’s passengers and crew.

“Very busy working late,” Jack writes in the handwritten note to Elsie. “I hope to leave on Monday and arrive at So’ton [Southampton] or Wednesday afternoon. I hope you’re well. Heard from Ethel yesterday. ‘

He signed off with: ‘Love Jack’.

Jack added in the address box, “Miss E. Phillips, Ryde Hse School, Ripley, Woking Surrey.”

It was probably one of the last correspondences the siblings had when Jack died on April 15 when the Titanic sank on its maiden voyage.

Jack, who shares the same name as the fictional character Jack Dawson, played by Leonardo DiCaprio (left with Kate Winslet) in the 1997 Oscar-winning film Titanic, wrote the message on the back of a glossy postcard

Jack, who shares the same name as the fictional character Jack Dawson, played by Leonardo DiCaprio (left with Kate Winslet) in the 1997 Oscar-winning film Titanic, wrote the message on the back of a glossy postcard

Jack, who shares the same name as the fictional character Jack Dawson, played by Leonardo DiCaprio (left with Kate Winslet) in the 1997 Oscar-winning film Titanic, wrote the message on the back of a glossy postcard

The Titanic, which sank on April 15, 1912, after colliding with an iceberg, lies on the seabed about 350 nautical miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.  The liner made two brief stops on its way to her planned Atlantic crossing: one in the French port of Cherbourg, the other in the port of Cork, Ireland, where smaller ships brought passengers on and off.

The Titanic, which sank on April 15, 1912, after colliding with an iceberg, lies on the seabed about 350 nautical miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada.  The liner made two brief stops on its way to her planned Atlantic crossing: one in the French port of Cherbourg, the other in the port of Cork, Ireland, where smaller ships brought passengers on and off.

The Titanic – which sank after colliding with an iceberg on April 15, 1912 – lies on the seabed about 350 nautical miles off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada. The liner made two brief stops en route to her planned Atlantic crossing – one in the French port of Cherbourg, the other in the port of Cork, Ireland, where smaller ships brought passengers on and off.

While the liner was sinking, Jack, who turned 25 on board the ship, worked tirelessly to send wireless SOS signals to other ships to enlist their help in the rescue of the Titanic’s passengers and crew.

Jack was able to reach liner ships hundreds of miles away – one of which was the Carpathia, the steamship that rescued 705 survivors from lifeboats two hours after the Titanic sank at 2:20 a.m.

But he wasn’t so happy for Jack. After leaving the ship when water gushed around his feet, he ended up on a toppled lifeboat, where he later died from exposure to the severe cold.

His body was never recovered and more than 1,500 died in the disaster.

Despite his youth, Jack was a seasoned telegraph operator who learned his trade while working for the post office in 1906.

During his career, serving on a number of ships for the Marconi Company, Jack kept in regular contact with his sister Elsie.

She kept nearly 300 postcards he sent her during his career.

But the chart now being sold by RR Auction House in Boston, Massachusetts has special significance as it was written in the weeks before the Titanic’s maiden voyage.

Bobby Livingston, executive vice president at RR Auction, said, “Phillips often chose postcards depicting the ships he served on.

“According to our research, only five of the 300 postcards Elsie kept had a relationship with the Titanic, and only two had the ship as a photo on the front.”

THE TITANIC DISASTER TIMELINE

Ned Parfett, the 'Titanic paperboy', outside the White Star Line offices in London

Ned Parfett, the 'Titanic paperboy', outside the White Star Line offices in London

Ned Parfett, the ‘Titanic paperboy’, outside the White Star Line offices in London

April 10, 1912 (noon):

The Titanic sets sail from Southampton to New York, calling at Cherbourg and Cork along the way.

April 14 (9:00 am – 10:30 pm, ship time):

Marconi Company radio officers on the Titanic received a total of six warnings of ice in the area, not all of which were passed on to the crew.

April 14 (11:39 PM):

Lookout Frederick Fleet, in the crow’s nest, sees an iceberg just in front of the ship. Towards port, the ship managed to avoid a direct collision, but instead received a ‘fleeting blow’.

April 15 (00:05):

Captain Edward Smith orders the ship to be abandoned and radio operators give distress signals.

April 15 (2:05 AM):

The Titanic’s last lifeboat is launched. Ten minutes later, the angle of the liner in the water increased rapidly, eventually reaching more than 30 degrees as water reached through the deck hatches previously unsupported parts of the ship.

April 15 (2:20 AM):

The Titanic eventually disappeared beneath the waves about two hours and forty minutes after hitting the iceberg.