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Popular ice creams such as Ben & Jerry’s and Twister stop advertising for children

Popular ice creams such as Ben & Jerry’s and Twister will no longer advertise for children.

Unilever, which owns brands such as Wall’s Ice Cream and Ben & Jerry’s among many others, makes the commitment despite an obesity crisis in children.

The company will shift advertisements for sweet treats from children under the age of 12 by removing cartoon characters from the package.

Critics say the use of animated characters on sugar-laden foods encourages children to harass parents to buy them.

The move is part of a broader industry effort, following the decision of the German supermarket chain Lidl to remove cartoons from their own branded grain products.

Unilever will also cut down on social media posts targeted at young people by no longer paying celebrities that primarily appeal to them.

Unilever has announced a 'genuine commitment' to a shift in their food and drink advertising, so the company will no longer focus on children under 12 years old

Unilever has announced a ‘genuine commitment’ to a shift in their food and drink advertising, so the company will no longer focus on children under 12 years old

Critics say the use of animated characters on sugar-laden foods encourages children to harass parents to buy them. Unilever's Twister is depicted with Max the Lion on the package

Critics say the use of animated characters on sugar-laden foods encourages children to harass parents to buy them. Unilever's Twister is depicted with Max the Lion on the package

Critics say the use of animated characters on sugar-laden foods encourages children to harass parents to buy them. Unilever’s Twister is depicted with Max the Lion on the package

The giant in food and drink, who owns Walls Ice Cream and Ben & Jerry's, puts the commitment in the face of an obesity crisis in children and will instead focus on parents

The giant in food and drink, who owns Walls Ice Cream and Ben & Jerry's, puts the commitment in the face of an obesity crisis in children and will instead focus on parents

The giant in food and drink, who owns Walls Ice Cream and Ben & Jerry’s, puts the commitment in the face of an obesity crisis in children and will instead focus on parents

“Our promise is a genuine commitment to making and marketing products responsibly for children,” said Matt Close, executive vice president of Unilever at the Global Ice Cream Category.

‘It is the promise of better ice cream and healthier, happier children. Both now and in the future. “

According to Unilever – the world’s largest ice maker Forbes – will apply the new rules to all its products by the end of 2020.

Under ‘strict controls’, traditional media such as films will no longer contain ads for ice cream that are attractive to children under 12 years of age.

Ads that appeal to young people under 13 on social media, with the help of celebrities and influencers, are also being stopped. However, most platforms have age restrictions anyway.

The food giant starts with its Wall’s Ice Cream products, including Twister, Paddle Pop, Calippo, Cornetto and Solero.

Some have a playful cartoon of a lion, including Mini Max Twister and Mini Milk.

In addition to the controls for advertisements, there are already plans for a ‘responsibly made’ assortment of Wall’s Ice Cream.

Each ice cream in the children’s assortment contains no more than 110 calories and a maximum of 12 grams of sugar per serving.

Unilever said the move was a response to World Health Organization figures – which estimate that 124 million children between the ages of five and 19 were obese worldwide, while 213 million were overweight.

In the UK, more than one in three children (34 percent) are obese or overweight when they leave primary school.

One in 25 British 10 to 11 year olds is obese, the thickest possible category.

HOW MANY SUGAR IS TOO MUCH?

The amount of sugar that a person must eat per day depends on how old he is.

Children from four to six years old must be limited to a maximum of 19 g per day.

Seven to 10 year olds may not have more than 24 g and children 11 years and older must have 30 g or less.

Meanwhile, the NHS recommends that adults have no more than 30 g of free sugars per day.

Popular snacks contain a surprising amount of sugar and even a single can of Coca Cola (35 g sugar) or a Mars bar (33 g) contains more than the maximum amount of sugar that a child should have during a whole day.

A bowl of Frosties contains 24 g of sugar, which means that a 10-year-old who has Frosties for breakfast probably reached his limit the day before they even left the house.

Children who eat too much sugar run the risk of damaging their teeth, putting on fat and becoming overweight and getting type 2 diabetes, which increases the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Source: NHS

Lidl announced earlier this month that they would strip the animated crocodiles, bees, tigers and monkeys from their grain packs.

In response, Tam Fry, president of the National Obesity Forum, told MailOnline that the decision would benefit “unprecedented millions of mothers.”

He added: “Children who throw tantrums in the shopping path if they don’t get the package they want are the scourge of parents.

“It may not matter what is actually in the package: it is probably the colorful and attractive cartoon animal on the outside that arouses their desire.

‘Remove the cartoons and kill pester power in one fell swoop is the prayer of countless millions of mothers. That Lidl answers that prayer should be welcome. “

Public Health England recommends that children aged 7 to 10 should not receive more than 24 g of free sugars per day – the equivalent of six sugar cubes.

Children from four to six years old must not have more than 19 g (five sugar cubes). It is recommended that adults have less than 30 g of free sugars per day.

There is no guideline limit for children under the age of four, but it is recommended to avoid sweetened drinks and foods with added sugar.

Lidl’s Crownfield Choco Rice, its own Coco Pops brand, is packed with 16 g of sugar in a small 30 g serving – not even a third of a bowl.

A 60 g portion, which is a more realistic size portion, contains 32 g of sugar – more than three donuts with Krispy Kreme frosting.

Crownfield Choco Shells from the cheap supermarket, a competitively priced version of Kellogg’s Coco Rocks, are packed with 18 g of sugar in a 50 g serving.

Lidl will remove cartoon characters from the packaging of sugary grains after increasing pressure from campaign groups and ministers

Lidl will remove cartoon characters from the packaging of sugary grains after increasing pressure from campaign groups and ministers

The Crownfield Rice Snaps, a proprietary brand version of Kellogg's Rice Crispies, will remove the crocodile character

The Crownfield Rice Snaps, a proprietary brand version of Kellogg's Rice Crispies, will remove the crocodile character

Lidl will remove cartoon characters from the packaging of sugary grains after increasing pressure from campaign groups and ministers. The Crownfield Rice Snaps, a proprietary brand version of Kellogg’s Rice Crispies, will remove the crocodile character

Childhood obesity has DOUBLE in a decade despite the £ 400 million government’s commitment to reduce the number of fat youngsters by 2020

A government initiative of £ 400 million to reduce childhood obesity by 2020 has failed miserably, campaigners say.

The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives 2008 strategy promised to “reduce the number of overweight and obese children in England to levels observed in the year 2000,” when 15 percent of young people were considered overweight.

Ministers offered compulsory cooking classes at school as part of the promise and encouraged healthier food choices and exercise.

The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives 2008 strategy promised to reduce the 'number of overweight and obese children in England'. But official NHS figures show that morbid obesity rates have nearly doubled among 6th year students since the nearly £ 400 million scheme was launched

The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives 2008 strategy promised to reduce the 'number of overweight and obese children in England'. But official NHS figures show that morbid obesity rates have nearly doubled among 6th year students since the nearly £ 400 million scheme was launched

The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives 2008 strategy promised to reduce the ‘number of overweight and obese children in England’. But official NHS figures show that morbid obesity rates have nearly doubled among 6th year students since the nearly £ 400 million settlement

But official NHS figures show that morbid obesity rates have almost doubled among sixth-year students since the scheme was launched.

Fewer than 14,000 10 to 11 year olds fell under the category when the project started in 2007. The figure rose to 26,158 in 2018/19.

And the obesity rate among 6-year-old students increased by two-thirds at that time, from 77,000 to 121,000, according to the national measurement program of the NHS.

It means that one third of the children are overweight by the time they finish primary school.

Tam fry, chairman of the National Obesity Forum, told MailOnline that civil servants are “too chicken” to enforce strict measures to tackle obesity.

He said: ‘For some thirty years, British governments have set goals to win the fight against obesity, but they have not achieved them.

“Wednesday’s missed target illustrates the regrettable disinterest of ruling politicians in tackling a disease that costs the NHS £ 24 billion annually.

‘They sniff and blow and know very well the hard measures that must be taken, but they are too chicken to make legislation for them.

NHS figures in October revealed Nearly half (44.9 percent) of all six children in Barking and Dagenham were considered overweight, obese or obese in 2018/19. In contrast, the rate was only 23.4 percent in Richmond upon Thames

NHS figures in October revealed Nearly half (44.9 percent) of all six children in Barking and Dagenham who were considered overweight, obese, or obese all year round in 2018/19. In contrast, the rate was only 23.4 percent in Richmond upon Thames

NHS figures revealed in October Almost half (44.9 percent) of all six children in Barking and Dagenham were considered overweight, obese or obese in 2018/19. In contrast, the rate was only 23.4 percent in Richmond upon Thames

‘It is as if by setting goals they think the problem will be leaked away. It won’t be.

“The newest goal this year, to halve childhood obesity by 2030, will have the same fate if no hard action is taken by 2020.”

Mr Fry said that mandatory calorie labeling in restaurants, sugar levies and a ban on energy drinks were some of the difficult new rules that were needed to tackle the spiral of crisis.

The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives project was launched in January 2008 by a Labor government in power since 1997.

Responsibility for obesity was shared between the Ministers of Health and Education, and supported by a large, separate budget for three years.

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