Poll that shows the massive majority wants to keep Roe v Wade is backtracked

The abortion policy is on the front again, since a poll that purports to show massive opposition to Roe v. Wade is recovering after causing a sensation in Washington

An online poll published on Wednesday appeared to find that only 23 percent of Americans want the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Historic abortion. Wade & # 39; and do the illegal abortion & # 39 ;, at a time when the elevation of the conservative judge Brett Kavanaugh to the impending high court.

Two Democratic Senate advisers told DailyMail.com on Wednesday that the poll will feature prominently in Democrats' arguments that Kavanaugh's alleged position on reproductive rights is not aligned with the nation and should keep him out of the highest court. of the nation.

But in the wake of DailyMail.com's questions about the survey's writing, the news organization that commissioned it delays it, probably leaving President Donald Trump's opponents on Capitol Hill without a much-needed arrow in his quiver while making a case final against Kavanaugh on the Senate floor

The question of the survey left open the possibility that the participants voted against a scenario that would be constitutionally impossible.

Roe banned most abortions by taking away the authority of the states to legalize the practice. Repealing it would not make abortions illegal: it would return the problem to the states to make more localized decisions.

The abortion policy is on the front again, since a poll that purports to show massive opposition to Roe v. Wade is recovering after causing a sensation in Washington

The abortion policy is on the front again, since a poll that purports to show massive opposition to Roe v. Wade is recovering after causing a sensation in Washington

Democrats in favor of the right to choose had planned to use the poll in Senate speeches against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, but now they can not

Democrats in favor of the right to choose had planned to use the poll in Senate speeches against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, but now they can not

Democrats in favor of the right to choose had planned to use the poll in Senate speeches against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, but now they can not

The Axios / SurveyMonkey survey asked if the Americans wanted to & # 39; revoke & # 39; to Roe v. Wade & # 39; and do the illegal abortion, & # 39; something that Roe would not do.

The Axios / SurveyMonkey survey asked if the Americans wanted to & # 39; revoke & # 39; to Roe v. Wade & # 39; and do the illegal abortion, & # 39; something that Roe would not do.

The Axios / SurveyMonkey survey asked if the Americans wanted to & # 39; revoke & # 39; to Roe v. Wade & # 39; and do the illegal abortion, & # 39; something that Roe would not do.

Axios editor-in-chief Nick Johnston told DailyMail.com on Wednesday that his organization would be reviewing its findings.

"That question was not well worded and we missed it," Johnston said in an email about the error.

23% of the participants agreed that they wanted the court to "overturn" Roe and that abortion be illegal. "In total, 71 percent chose: No, leave the decision as it is. # 39;

A high-ranking aide to a pro-life Republican congressman said Wednesday on the background: "That's a bull of bullshit. What a stupid push survey.

The SurveyMonkey survey led Axios to conclude that & # 39;
Axios presented the survey as a referendum on Roe, but concluded after DailyMail.com questions that it really measured the small proportion of Americans who want all abortions banned.

Axios presented the survey as a referendum on Roe, but concluded after DailyMail.com questions that it really measured the small proportion of Americans who want all abortions banned.

Axios presented the survey as a referendum on Roe, but concluded after DailyMail.com questions that it really measured the small proportion of Americans who want all abortions banned.

"Roe's erosion or overturning will simply allow the wheels of democracy to revolve in every state … When voters are asked whether they want courts or elected officials to determine the law of abortion, they overwhelmingly choose your elected officials, "he said.

In July, the Dannenfelser group commissioned the independent firm McLaughlin & Associates to survey 1,000 potential voters. That survey found that 58 percent wanted the legislatures of their states to determine the future of the abortion policy, not the Supreme Court.

The unconventional survey method SurveyMonkey uses a larger sample of Americans than usual, but it is limited only to people who have already chosen & # 39; online.

While the company says it has access to a group of more than 2 million Americans, it may not be a representative sample of US voters. UU Since only about six tenth of one percent of the country's population has any chance of being surveyed.