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Police seek independent legal advice on how to prosecute Waylon Johncock after images of him who stoned a wombat went viral

A police officer who stoned a wombat has still not been charged five weeks after being filmed killing the animal.

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Horrible footage went viral from police officer Waylon Johncock who repeatedly threw stones at the head of a wombat on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia on October 3.

The police have sought independent legal advice on how to prosecute Johncock after & # 39; complexity and problems & # 39; involved in the case.

While the investigation is ongoing, the police confirmed that it was referred to the director of the public prosecutor.

SA police commissioner Grant Stevens told 5AA that it was referred for independent advice.

Police seek independent legal advice about prosecuting Waylon Johncock (photo) after images of him who stoned a wombat went viral

Police seek independent legal advice about prosecuting Waylon Johncock (photo) after images of him who stoned a wombat went viral

The out-of-service police officer who was filmed to stone a wombat is a community liaison officer named Waylon Johncock (photo)
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The out-of-service police officer who was filmed to stone a wombat is a community liaison officer named Waylon Johncock (photo)

The image above shows Johncock with the same tattoo as the man captured in the video

The image above shows Johncock with the same tattoo as the man captured in the video

The image above shows Johncock with the same tattoo as the man captured in the video

& # 39; The DPP asked us for more information, which we received and which was returned to the DPP for investigation & quot ;, he said Thursday.

The investigation was launched in October, with the final decision to determine whether or not Johncock will receive criminal charges related to animal abuse.

The police declined to comment on the case due to the ongoing investigation.

The former South Australian AFL player was widely convicted, even by indigenous elderly people, and 300,000 people have signed a petition calling for him to be punished.

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The images caused outrage throughout the country and Aboriginal elders came forward to hurl the agent's actions.

Elder Ngarrindjeri, Major Sumner, said that the officer's shockingly cruel actions when stoning the soft animal & # 39; error & # 39; goods.

& # 39; We didn't hunt like that. We still don't hunt like that, & said the 71-year-old.

His comments come after Wirangu-Kokatha Elder Jack Johncock said the agent acted in his rights.

Under the Native Title Act of 1993, Aboriginal people are allowed to maintain old customs such as hunting local wildlife.

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Indigenous people in South Australia have traditionally killed wombats with rocks.

& # 39; For the people on the west coast of South Australia, the wombat is a big part of their diet and they get wombat as they can, & # 39; he said.

He said a petition to make stone killing illegal is a & # 39; lack of understanding of cultural practices & # 39; showed.

The video was made on the Eyre peninsula in South Australia, in which the out-of-service officer repeatedly throws stones at the head of the wombat while being encouraged by a friend

The video was made on the Eyre peninsula in South Australia, in which the out-of-service officer repeatedly throws stones at the head of the wombat while being encouraged by a friend

The video shows the wombat wobbling along the road while two men follow in a car before the off-duty police officer gets out of the car with only shorts and shoes on

The video shows the wombat wobbling along the road while two men follow in a car before the off-duty police officer gets out of the car with only shorts and shoes on

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The video was made on the Eyre peninsula in South Australia, in which the out-of-service officer repeatedly throws stones at the head of the wombat while being encouraged by a friend

He is now a Senior Community Constable from a remote community in South Australia

He is now a Senior Community Constable from a remote community in South Australia

He is now a Senior Community Constable from a remote community in South Australia

& # 39; Do they not think they have made enough changes to this country to take away all our rights and customs? & # 39; he said.

& # 39; I think that is enough.

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Jack said that people should not judge something that has been part of his culture for thousands of years.

What are the laws for killing wombats?

The Native Title Act was adopted in 1993 to protect the land rights of Aboriginals.

It also allowed their traditional customs to be preserved.

Hunting local wildlife, for example, is permitted by law.

Campaigners say this contradicts part 3, section 13 of the Animal Welfare Act and that the law needs to be amended.

Prime Minister Steven Marshall described the video of the incident as & # 39; guts & # 39 ;.

& # 39; The public distribution of acts that glorify animal abuse is completely and completely unacceptable, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Animal abuse is animal abuse.

& # 39; Most people who look at those images would be disgusted. & # 39;

The video shows the wombat wobbling along the road while a car follows, before Johncock gets out of the car with shorts and shoes.

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He begins to chase the animal before the man behind the wheel tells him to come up close & # 39 ;.

Johncock sees a large rock pick up and throws it maliciously at the head of the wombat while both men laugh.

The wombat starts running in an attempt to get away from the men before they both go after him.

& # 39; You have him, you have him, hit him, hit him, & # 39; can hear the man in the car say while Johncock picks up another stone.

& # 39; Kill him! & # 39;

The out-of-service police officer can turn around and give his friend a thumbs up before throwing the rock at the head of the wombat
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The out-of-service police officer can turn around and give his friend a thumbs up before throwing the rock at the head of the wombat

The out-of-service police officer can turn around and give his friend a thumbs up before throwing the rock at the head of the wombat

While the man behind the wheel accelerates to make the headlights shine on him, Johncock gives a final blow, causing him to fall.

& # 39; Yes! You did it! & # 39; the man in the car says.

& # 39; First man I have ever seen killing a wombat on foot, man. & # 39;

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Johncock has been with the South Australian Police Force for ten years as one of the state's 36 Community Liaison Officers.

He is now a Senior Community Constable based in the remote Nullabor region near the border with Western Australia.

Johncock's time in the armed forces has been spent helping non-indigenous officers to understand cultural and social issues within the community to bridge the gap.

At the time, he said that a crucial part of his job was to assist in communication between non-indigenous and Aboriginal people.

& # 39; There is a huge gap in the English and Pitjantjatjara language & # 39 ;, he said.

& # 39; Because I have a basic knowledge of the Pitjantjatjara language, I can help my regular member with whom I work to communicate. & # 39;

As soon as the wombat falls over, both men hear laughter while the out-of-service police officer stands up triumphantly

As soon as the wombat falls over, both men hear laughter while the out-of-service police officer stands up triumphantly

As soon as the wombat falls over, both men hear laughter while the out-of-service police officer stands up triumphantly

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