Police killer, 30, argues that he should get parole because he developed PTSD after strangling an officer

Christopher Garnier's attorney argues that the convicted police killer suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the murder and due to his mental health should be eligible for parole

The lawyer for a man convicted of strangulating a policeman and then getting rid of his body told a judge that his client should be eligible for parole because he has a post-traumatic stress disorder caused by the murder itself.

Christopher Garnier, of Canada, was convicted in December of second-degree murder and interfering with a corpse in the death of Agent Catherine Campbell.

Garnier, 30, strangled Campbell, 36, on September 11, 2015 in a McCully Street apartment after the couple met at a bar in Halifax.

Then he threw his body into a large container of green manure near a bridge.

Christopher Garnier's attorney argues that the convicted police killer suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the murder and due to his mental health should be eligible for parole

Christopher Garnier's attorney argues that the convicted police killer suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the murder and due to his mental health should be eligible for parole

Officer Catherine Campbell

Officer Catherine Campbell

Agent Catherine Campbell dies in September 2015

Agent Catherine Campbell dies in September 2015

Agent Catherine Campbell, 36, was strangled to death in September 2015 by Garnier after the couple met a bar.

Garnier was sentenced to life imprisonment, but his lawyer argues that the mental state of the convicted murderer should be a "mitigating factor" in deciding his eligibility for parole.

In court appearances, attorney Joel Pink said Garnier was diagnosed with acute PTSD by psychiatrist Dr. Stephen Hucker, who testified during the murder trial that Garnier developed the disorder immediately after Campbell's death.

"The testimony of Dr. Hucker clearly indicates that there is a strong link between Mr. Garnier's illness and his interference with human remains, therefore, it should be considered a mitigating factor in his sentence (for that charge)," he said. Pink, according to Herald News.

Pink argued that treatment is "the best way to guarantee the protection of the public and that offensive behavior does not recur".

During the trial, Garnier repeatedly told the jury that he does not remember throwing Campbell's body into the compost bin. He also said that he accidentally strangled Campbell during rough sex.

According to the Herald News, Pink told the judge that Garnier should only serve a maximum of 10 years in prison: 10 for the murder conviction and two for interfering with a body, with both sentences simultaneously.

Prosecutors, however, want Garnier to serve at least 16 years before he can apply for parole saying he is "calculating," "manipulating," and "dangerous."

Prosecutors said Garnier took Campbell to an apartment (pictured) where he was staying and strangled her before throwing his body in a large trash can

Prosecutors said Garnier took Campbell to an apartment (pictured) where he was staying and strangled her before throwing his body in a large trash can

Prosecutors said Garnier took Campbell to an apartment (pictured) where he was staying and strangled her before throwing his body in a large trash can

– Sir. Garnier not only murdered Mrs. Campbell, but interfered with Ms. Campbell's remains, "the prosecutors wrote in their presentations." She demonstrated a callous disregard for Mrs. Campbell, and made an attempt to cover her crime. " .

The prosecution also said that Campbell died in a "horrible" manner and Garnier broke his nose and damaged the cartilage in his neck while strangulating her. They also pointed out that the tests have never been recovered.

Garnier, who was training to become a firefighter at the time, never called 911 and did not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, prosecutors said.

"The message must be sent that Mr. Garnier must be remembered forever as the person who stole Mrs. Campbell's future for no reason, and then treated his remains as garbage," said the submission.

& # 39; Should be remembered as someone who tried to cover up their crime. Your period of eligibility for parole must reflect the nature of the offense, its future danger and its deterrence. "

A hearing to determine when Garnier will be eligible for parole is scheduled for Monday at the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

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