Police DO NOT check vaccine passports and instead leave it up to NSW companies to deny entry

Police will not walk through parks, shops and pubs in NSW demanding vaccination certificates after lockdown ends, the state’s top agent confirms.

Sydneysiders will flock to pubs, cafes and restaurants from October 11, the day the city’s lockdown will finally end when NSW reaches 70 percent Covid vaccination.

Patrons will have to show proof of their vaccination status to enter, but it will primarily be up to companies to kick out the non-vaxxers, not the police.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller has confirmed officers will not walk through businesses to ensure customers are fully vaccinated on Freedom Day

“We won’t be walking through restaurants, cafes and pubs to check if people are double vaccinated,” said Police Commissioner Mick Fuller. 2GB radio on Tuesday.

“We will certainly help restaurant owners and shop owners if they refuse someone entry, we will certainly respond to help those people.

“The future role of the police in the field of vaccination will not prevent people from accessing their vaccination passports.”

Commissioner Fuller urged everyone to ‘keep calm’ once restrictions are lifted, as police expected some businesses to need help turning down customers.

“We expect there will be companies asking us for help with the right to refuse anyone entry to their buildings,” he said.

Residents must show either a digital certificate on their phone or a printed copy to confirm they have had both shots.

The certificate is generated via the MyGov website or the Express Plus Medicare app and is also expected to be integrated into the existing Service NSW app.

As part of the vaccine passport, residents are required to show either a digital certificate on their phone or a printed copy confirming they've had both shots (police speaking with Sydney residents ahead of a planned protest earlier this month)

As part of the vaccine passport, residents are required to show either a digital certificate on their phone or a printed copy confirming they’ve had both shots (police speaking with Sydney residents ahead of a planned protest earlier this month)

A two-week trial of the Passport on the NSW app is expected to roll out in regions of the state on October 6.

But with no police enforcing the passports, there are fears that small businesses or young workers could be put at risk from angry customers trying to break the rules.

NSW Customer Service Secretary Victor Dominello said passport checking should not be left to young workers or smaller businesses.

He warned that those found with false or forged certificates could face jail time.

“If people want to do the wrong thing, if they get discovered, like I said, it could be jail time there,” he told ABC.

“Companies, especially small businesses, should not be de facto police officers. If there is an escalation, call the authorities.”

The certificate is generated via the MyGov website or the Express Plus Medicare app, while also expected to be integrated into the existing Service NSW app

The certificate is generated via the MyGov website or the Express Plus Medicare app, while also expected to be integrated into the existing Service NSW app

There is no public health decision for the vaccination rule yet, but it could work similarly to other corporate guidelines, such as QR check-ins where companies are fined $55,000 for failing to comply.

The vaccine passport may be obsolete on December 1, as Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian announces that restrictions on unvaccinated people will be lifted when the state reaches 90 percent double vaxxed.

When asked about police checking vaccine passports during Tuesday’s Covid press conference, Health Minister Brad Hazzard said he was “pretty confident” that the police would carry out the orders.

It was not clear, however, whether he was contradicting Commissioner Fuller, or whether he simply meant that they would help if called upon by companies.

He added that it is up to the company to decide whether unvaccinated customers will be allowed to enter after December 1, when they are subject to the same restrictions as everyone else.

“Companies will be able to decide for themselves whether they want to risk people entering their property if they are not vaccinated,” he said.

Ms Berejiklian previously defended her decision to allow liberties to unvaccinated people when asked whether opening to all residents on December 1 was too early.

‘On the contrary. We’ve been very conservative because a lot of reports say at a double dose of 80 percent you should consider opening up to the unvaccinated and we’ve said no,” she told the Today show.

‘We will probably reach that 80 percent in October. We say you can’t do anything then. You have to wait at least another month, even four or five weeks, before you can start integrating into society.’

However, the prime minister’s added life would still be somewhat limited for those who choose not to get the jab.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian announced restrictions on unvaccinated people would be eased once the state doubles 90 percent

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian announced restrictions on unvaccinated people would be eased once the state doubles 90 percent

“Many organizations already have mandatory vaccination programs in place,” she told Sunrise.

“While the government says unvaccinated people may have other rights from December 1, many airlines have said they will not carry anyone who has not been vaccinated. Many companies have said that they will not accept that someone has not been vaccinated.

“Life for the unvaccinated will be very difficult indefinitely.”

She said she expected to be criticized, but reiterated that she took a stricter stance than recommended health advice.

“Whatever decision I announced yesterday, I would have been criticized,” Ms Berejiklian told ABC News Breakfast on Tuesday.

“The Doherty report recommends starting at 80 percent that unvaccinated people should participate in society. We said no, we’re going harder and more conservative.

‘I expect that in a few weeks we will have at least 90 percent of the adult population on a first dose. If you register for the first dose, you will also register for the second.’

Pictured: People are seen Saturday in Steyne park, Double Bay in Sydney

Pictured: People are seen Saturday in Steyne park, Double Bay in Sydney

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