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Police conduct patrols at the doctor’s house after being attacked by vigilantes for not socially distancing themselves

Police have patrolled outside a cardiologist’s house after he was suspended and targeted by vigilantes who showed him on social media for not socializing away at an anti-lockdown meeting in Wisconsin.

Dr. David Murdock, a cardiologist with the Aspirus medical group, may no longer see patients in the “ foreseeable future ” after photos of him ignoring social distance rules and not wearing masks went viral on Facebook last month during a protest.

The 33-year-old doctor was exposed when Kevin Rusch saw a photo of him in the crowd during the rally and shamed him for breaking the state-resident state and putting his patients at risk of exposure to the virus.

Murdock, 68, admitted to attending the event, but insisted that he distance himself socially.

Authorities have now had to step up protection for the Wausau-based physician after someone left a bag of feces on the steps of his home – part of a growing wave of socially distant vigilance in the U.S. as the pandemic continues to divide Americans.

Dr. David Murdock, a cardiologist with the Aspirus medical group, was suspended after this photo of him was distributed on social media during the Open Wisconsin Now protest on Mosinee on April 19, disrupting the state-resident state. The photo was posted with the conviction above

Dr. David Murdock, a cardiologist with the Aspirus medical group, was suspended after this photo of him was distributed on social media during the Open Wisconsin Now protest on Mosinee on April 19, disrupting the state-resident state. The photo was posted with the conviction above

Dr. David Murdock, a cardiologist with the Aspirus medical group, was suspended after this photo of him was distributed on social media during the Open Wisconsin Now protest on Mosinee on April 19, disrupting the state-resident state. The photo was posted with the conviction above

Murdock was revealed on social media last month when an old acquaintance saw photos of him at the Open Wisconsin Now protest at Mosinee on April 19, calling for an end to Wisconsin home defense.

Rusch posted the photo on Murdock’s Facebook page asking, “Is this true David?”

In the picture, Murdock is seen wearing an American flag bandana on his head and smiling at the camera.

Like many of the protesters, he did not wear a face mask.

Another shocking picture shows that the doctor ignores the social distance rules to keep a distance of five feet while wrapping his arms around a priest while holding up a sign that says, “We are an essential shift.’

Rusch, also from Wausau, slammed Murdock and warned the cardiologist’s patients to go to him “at his own risk” for treatment.

Authorities have now had to increase protection for the Wausau-based physician (photo) after someone left a bag of feces on the steps of their home

Authorities have now had to increase protection for the Wausau-based physician (photo) after someone left a bag of feces on the steps of their home

Authorities have now had to increase protection for the Wausau-based physician (photo) after someone left a bag of feces on the steps of their home

“His photo came out and when I saw it, I was furious,” Rusch told the New York Times.

“I thought, this man hugs people and rubs elbows without P.P.E. and he actively sees patients. ‘

The photo sparked a backlash, with many condemning Murdock’s social media behavior and Rusch leading a large number of people to contact his employer Aspirus, calling for him to be fired.

The next day, Murdock was suspended from the hospital for a week and extended his absence with annual leave.

Aspirus said Murdock had violated company policies that required all employees to adhere to Wisconsin’s safer home delivery order, which bans meetings of 10 or more people.

The company said in a statement that Murdock “attended a large gathering this weekend and appears to be violating social distance practices.”

Watchful Kevin Rusch (above) posted the photo on Murdock’s Facebook page asking, “Is this true David?” A growing wave of socially distant vigilance has emerged, with citizens calling each other to ignore executive orders

But the disgraced medic has repulsed the vigilantes, who he says have spread “wrong information” about him and have committed a “political hit job” against him.

In a Facebook post on April 26, he insisted that he adhere to social distance during the protest and that no patient would be endangered by his actions.

He also said his family was forced to file a police report after the feces were left on the stairs of their home.

Murdock said he was “in FULL agreement” with Wisconsin’s first governor order Tony Evers to end on April 24, but disagreed with its expansion across the state saying that some communities have not been hit as hard by COVID-19 as expected.

Fortunately, we haven’t seen nearly as many COVID cases as we expected and were willing to treat. To date, there have been only 17 confirmed cases of COVID in Marathon County and only one death since the pandemic began. Those numbers haven’t changed in a few days, ”he wrote.

“The forced closure has caused serious adverse health effects locally because it has prevented people from getting the care they need. This is likely to get worse because many health care institutions are facing a financial collapse. ‘

He said he believes restrictions should be maintained in the hard-hit areas of the US, but called for a “regional” approach.

“Areas with lower risk and companies should plan to open the economy quickly,” he added.

Murdock also claimed that he attended the event to research a book about his career as a cardiologist so he could see “what this virus was doing to the community. I wanted to see and speak to people from a distance, ask them why you are here ‘.

The disgraced medic has repulsed the vigilantes who he says have spread “wrong information” about him and have committed a “political hit job” against him

Murdock insisted that he adhere to social distance during the protest and that his actions did not endanger any patient. He also said his family was forced to file a police report after leaving the feces on the stairs of their home

Murdock insisted that he adhere to social distance during the protest and that his actions did not endanger any patient. He also said his family was forced to file a police report after leaving the feces on the stairs of their home

Murdock insisted that he adhere to social distance during the protest and that his actions did not endanger any patient. He also said his family was forced to file a police report after leaving the feces on the stairs of their home

This marks one of many instances where vigilant behavior engulfs the nation as tensions rise between the anti-lockdown protesters on the one hand and social distance champions on the other.

As the pandemic continues to spread across the United States and some states begin to ease restrictions on closing locks, the nation has become increasingly divided over the appropriate response to the pandemic.

On the one hand, thousands of anti-lockdown protesters – many of them wearing Republican and Donald Trump-style sportswear – have taken to the streets and marched to the capital’s buildings demanding an end to their home orders, claiming that they lost freedom and business. jobs and the economy have been irreparably damaged.

On the other hand, counter-protesters and vigilantes fearing that states that open too early and those who ignore medical advice that social distance is key to flattening the curve could cause a renewed spike in cases and deaths of U.S. people.

A growing number of people on this side have become informers, people report to authorities or at a lower level for violating home orders.

Neighborhood websites and bulletin boards are used to shame locals.

Meanwhile, social media is flooded with photos of so-called ‘covidiots,’ and the hashtag #FloridaMorons is popular and shamed beachgoers ignore social distances in the sun.

Vigilance has also come under attack.

In April, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio set up a hotline where people could send photos of fellow New Yorkers who ignored the state’s social distance rules.

De Blasio faced backlash from people who dubbed the movement “un-American” on social media, and the system was temporarily halted.

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