Polar bear jumps on a Russian nuclear submarine in search of food

Polar bear jumps on a Russian nuclear submarine in search of food after the crew has dropped bags of waste in the Arctic

  • Curious polar bear was seen who stepped on the submarine of the Delta IV class and looked for food
  • Submarine is supposed to patrol north of the Norwegian islands of Svalbard and Jan Mayen
  • Photos show the animal that sits on the ice and looks at the huge sub before he carefully steps onto the deck

Bryony Jewell for Mailonline

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A curious polar bear is pictured as he steps out of the ice on a Russian nuclear submarine while searching for food in the Arctic.

The subclass of the Delta IV class is supposed to have been north of the Norwegian islands of Svalbard and Jan Mayen when the crew decided to come up to get rid of bags of waste.

All 120 sailors on board were told that they had to stay under the deck while the 65stone bear was sniffing, the Sunday Express reports.

Photo taken from above the deck shows the lone polar bear sitting close to the submarine before he begins to traverse the thick ice and leans in to take a look before moving on.

A lonely polar bear sits on the ice and looks at the Russian Delta IV class submarine that is thought to have been patrolled north of the Norwegian islands of Svalbard and Jan Mayen

A lonely polar bear sits on the ice and looks at the Russian Delta IV class submarine that is thought to have been patrolled north of the Norwegian islands of Svalbard and Jan Mayen

The bear first protrudes his head to see the submarine broken through the ice to dump waste

The bear first protrudes his head to see the submarine broken through the ice to dump waste

The bear first protrudes his head to see the submarine broken through the ice to dump waste

Norway and Russia share a population of about 3,000 polar bears, but litter threatens the region and the wildlife.

Experts say that the pollution of Russia in the Arctic would take hundreds of years to clean up and this is not the first time that sailors have attracted unwanted attention from polar bears during dumping.

A source from the Royal Navy told the Sunday Express: "We comply fully with shipping legislation and have systems to sort, recycle and dispose of waste in an environmentally friendly manner. & # 39;

The Norwegian island of Spitsbergen is the only permanently populated area in the Svalbard area, but polar bears can be seen throughout the area.

Polar bears are found in five countries across the North Pole in the United States in Alaska, Canada, Russia, Greenland and Norway at Svalbard.

The 65stone bear stretches over the 167 meter long submarine and looks at something on the deck with a leg on the ice

The 65stone bear stretches over the 167 meter long submarine and looks at something on the deck with a leg on the ice

The 65stone bear stretches over the 167 meter long submarine and looks at something on the deck with a leg on the ice

After exploring the deck, the polar bear swims away and retreats to some ice in the waters north of the Norwegian islands

After exploring the deck, the polar bear swims away and retreats to some ice in the waters north of the Norwegian islands

After exploring the deck, the polar bear swims away and retreats to some ice in the waters north of the Norwegian islands

Polar bears depend on the high fat content in seal fat to preserve their diet. The bears hunt for both ringed and bearded seals, but will also eat other prey if they have it, Polar Bears International reports.

The Delta IV submarines are strategic nuclear missile submarines, are 167 m long and can carry up to 18 missiles or torpedoes, reports Naval Technology.

In October 2018, polar bears were filmed that haunt the terrified residents in the remote Russian city of Dikson.

It is thought that the animals came to the city to find food and the police were not allowed to shoot according to the law to kill unless a predator attacks a person, directly endangering life.

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