PM launches crackdown on landlords who evict tenants in the short term for no reason

PM launches crackdowns against landlords who accommodate tenants in the short term for no reason: housing shake & # 39; gives peace of mind to 11 million tenants & # 39;

  • The government announces major housing shocks to protect vulnerable tenants
  • Relocation would put an end to the habit of having tenants cancel only eight weeks in advance
  • But warning landlords about new rules can result in fewer homes being available to rent

Housing, Communities and Local Government Secretary James Brokenshire starts a consultation on the proposal

Housing, Communities and Local Government Secretary James Brokenshire starts a consultation on the proposal

Landlords will no longer be able to evict short-term tenants without good reason under a major change of housing announced today.

Prime Minister Theresa May said the move would put an end to the threat of so-called & # 39; no-fault & # 39; house evictions that tenants cancel as little as eight weeks to leave when their fixed-term contracts have ended. But landlords have warned that the move & # 39; indefinite lease through the back door & # 39; could result in fewer homes being available in the rental sector.

Housing, Communities and Local Government Secretary James Brokenshire, who will be holding a consultation today, said the government was taking action to prove that the end of the lease through the process of Paragraph 21 is one of the main causes of homelessness.

Mrs. May said: & Everyone who rents in the private sector has the right to feel safe at home, settle in their community and be able to look to the future with confidence.

& # 39; But millions of responsible tenants could still be torn away by their landlord with little notice, and often little justification. This is wrong – and today we act by preventing these unfair evictions. & # 39;

Currently, landlords can evict tenants if they still occupy their assets after the fixed-term contract has ended – without giving a reason.

Prime Minister Theresa May says a new system would prevent unfair evictions and help protect vulnerable tenants in the private rental sector [File photo]

Prime Minister Theresa May says a new system would prevent unfair evictions and help protect vulnerable tenants in the private rental sector [File photo]

Prime Minister Theresa May says a new system would prevent unfair evictions and help protect vulnerable tenants in the private rental sector [File photo]

The proposals would require landlords to provide a & # 39; concrete, proven reason that is already enshrined in the law & # 39; for terminating rental contracts.

Mr. Brokenshire said the move to get rid of these specific types of evictions will be balanced by ensuring that responsible landlords can get their property back where they have good reasons for doing so. But David Smith of the Residential Landlords Association warned that there was a & # 39; serious hazard & # 39; was that the proposed reforms could lead to a reduction in the supply of rental properties.

He said: & As the demand for private rental properties continues to increase, we need the majority of good landlords to have confidence to invest in new properties.

& # 39; This means that they must ensure that they can take up properties quickly again for legitimate reasons, such as rent arrears, antisocial behavior of tenants or they want to sell.

& # 39; For all the talk about more security for tenants, that will be nothing if the homes to be rented are not there in the first place. We call on the government to act with caution. & # 39; The plans come after buy-to-let landlords are hit by an increase in stamp duty for those who buy a second home.

Richard Lambert, of the National Landlords Association, said: “Landlords currently have little choice but to use paragraph 21.

& # 39; They have no confidence in the ability or capacity of the courts to settle occupation claims quickly and securely, regardless of the strength of the landlord's case.

& # 39; This change makes the fixed term meaningless, thus creating a new system of indefinite lease through the back door. & # 39; A spokesperson for the Department of Housing said: "Court litigation will be speeded up so that landlords will be able to get their property back quickly and smoothly in the rare event that tenants make up arrears or damage the property." # 39;

Shelter CEO Polly Neate welcomed the plans as & # 39; an extraordinary win for the 11 million private tenants of England & # 39 ;. She said: & # 39; This change will inhibit unstable tenants in the short term and give tenants everywhere a huge boost in security, for which the government deserves great honor. & # 39;

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