Plus-size model Tess Holliday reveals she has anorexia

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Tess Holliday reveals she has anorexia: Plus-size model says she’s ‘cured of eating disorder’ after years of ‘punishing her body’

  • Tess, 35, opened up on social media about her eating disorder last weekend in response to her growing frustration with people commenting on her weight
  • The plus-size model and a positivity activist said she’s no longer ashamed to say she’s ‘anorexic and in recovery’
  • She added that she is now able to ‘take care’ of the body she has ‘punished’ all her life and is ‘finally free’
  • Tess explained in an Instagram post that she lost weight while curing her eating disorder and people have been encouraging her to lose more
  • The mother of two urged them to stop, saying it’s ‘triggering as hell’

Tess Holliday has revealed that she has “ anorexia and recovery ” after decades of struggling with body image and backlash over her weight.

The 35-year-old, who rose to fame as a plus-size model and positivity activist, took to social media over the weekend to open up about her eating disorder in response to her growing frustration with people commenting on her weight and health .

‘I am anorexic and recovering. I’m no longer ashamed to say it out loud, ‘she tweeted. ‘I am the result of a culture that celebrates thinness and equates that with value, but now I get to write my own story. I can finally provide a body that I have been punishing all my life and I am finally free. ‘

Opening: Tess Holliday, 35, revealed she ‘has anorexia and is recovering’

Candid: The plus-size model said she is

Candid: The plus-size model said she is “not ashamed” to say she has an eating disorder

The body positivity activist explained in another Instagram post that she lost weight while recovering from her eating disorder and was inundated with people encouraging her to lose more.

To anyone who keeps saying, ‘you’ve been looking healthy lately’ or ‘you’re losing weight, keep it up! ‘ Stop. Do not. Comment. On. My. Weight. Or. Perceived. Health. To keep. It. To. Yourself. Thanks, ”she wrote.

“I’m curing an eating disorder and feeding my body regularly for the first time in my life,” she noted.

“If you equate weight loss with ‘health’ and value and value someone’s size, you’re basically saying we’re more valuable now because we’re smaller and maintain the diet culture… and that’s lame. NOT here for this. ‘

Triggering: The plus-size model explained on Twitter and Instagram that she lost weight while curing her eating disorder and people have been encouraging her to lose more

Triggering: The plus-size model explained on Twitter and Instagram that she lost weight while curing her eating disorder and people have been encouraging her to lose more

Happy: The body positivity activist said she is now able to 'take care' of the body she 'punished' all her life and that she is 'finally free'

Happy: The body positivity activist said she is now able to ‘take care’ of the body she ‘punished’ all her life and that she is ‘finally free’

The mother of two added that people’s positive comments about her weight loss trigger both her and others.

“For people like me who are trying to reframe and heal our relationship with our bodies, hearing comments about weight is hell,” she said.

‘It puts us back in our progress – and when people working on themselves see that you react to me that way, it hurts THEM, not just me. I can take it (I shouldn’t, but I can) but they haven’t asked for that trauma, okay? ‘

Tess ended her post with a warning, saying, “If you can’t tell someone they look nice without talking about their size, then honey, please don’t say nuthin at all.”

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss, fear of gaining weight and distorted body image, according to the National Association for Eating Disorders (NEDA).

People with anorexia generally limit their calories and types of foods they eat. They can also exercise compulsively, flushing through vomiting and laxatives and / or binge eating.

While anorexia is usually associated with low body weight, studies have shown that people with larger bodies can also have anorexia.

Atypical anorexia nervosa was formally recognized in 2013 and is diagnosed in patients who do not have the usual low body weight synonymous with the condition.

NEDA noted that larger-bodied people who struggle with the eating disorder are “ less likely to be diagnosed because of cultural biases against fat and obesity. ”

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