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Plans to reopen stores in ‘chaos’ with experts warning the second wave are likely

Plans to reopen stores in ‘chaos’ with experts warning of the second wave is likely because customers need 108 SQUARE FOOT space to keep a safe distance

  • Stores should give every customer 10 square feet of ‘dynamic space,’ study says
  • It also found that each person needs 118 square meters in larger stores and 129 square meters outdoors
  • SAGE advisors have warned that reopening stores on June 15 could risk a second wave
  • It’s because North West and South West England have seen their R rates rise above 1

Plans to reopen stores are in ‘chaos’ with experts warning that a second wave is likely because customers will need 108 square feet of space to get to a safe social distance.

High street stores should give every consumer at least 10 square feet of ‘dynamic space’ to move around, according to a new study.

The study also found that each person needs 11 square meters (11 square meters) in larger stores and 12 square meters (12 square meters) for outdoor spaces.

It comes as advisors to SAGE (Scientific Emergency Group) warn that reopening stores on June 15 could risk a second wave and subsequent lockdown.

Plans to reopen stores are in 'chaos' with experts warning that a second wave is likely because customers will need 108 square feet of space to keep safe social distance

Plans to reopen stores are in ‘chaos’ with experts warning that a second wave is likely because customers will need 108 square feet of space to keep safe social distance

In the paper from the universities of Manchester Metropolitan and Cardiff: “This is a complex issue that also requires careful management of people once they are in a space, coupled with self-discipline and public compliance.

“In addition to the size of the floor space, the layout and positioning of goods, entry and exit points and point of sale arrangements will have a major impact on what the final capacity can be for an individual retail environment.”

The study notes that the estimates “don’t take into account the specifics” of some spaces.

Currently, the government guideline advises employers to define the ‘number of customers than reasonably follow at 2 m social distance’.

It adds, “Malls should take responsibility for controlling the number of customers in the center and the queuing process in common areas on behalf of their retail tenants.”

Chris Turner, the director of British Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) said The Guardian: “Retailers are finding creative ways to deal with this two-meter malarkey – but they can’t afford to have them all lined up at the same time, because if everyone does that, it’ll be chaos.”

Meanwhile, Matt Hancock raised the prospect last night that North West and South West England would be completely shut down again to combat local waves of coronavirus infection.

Both regions have seen their crucial R rates rise above 1, the benchmark for preventing a new crisis.

Matt Hancock introduced himself at last night's coronavirus news briefing, highlighting the prospect of North West and South West England fully locking again

Matt Hancock introduced himself at last night's coronavirus news briefing, highlighting the prospect of North West and South West England fully locking again

Matt Hancock introduced himself at last night’s coronavirus news briefing, highlighting the prospect of North West and South West England fully locking again

Separate estimates made by experts from Public Health England and Cambridge University today suggested that this figure, the average number of people infecting each Covid-19 patient, is above the hazard level.

Asked about the situation at the daily press conference in Downing Street. Mr Hancock said the government was “looking for a more local approach” to deal with outbreaks.

Colin Cox, Cumbria’s public health director, told it The sun: “This really underscores the importance of people who keep social distance and continue to follow government guidelines as lock restrictions begin to ease.

“We will be following the R number very carefully and tightening of the lockdown restrictions could be possible if the R number increases.”

Outdoor Britannia! Restaurants, pubs and cafes prepare for outdoor dining revolution after Boris Johnson’s ‘Great Recovery Bill’ swears to speed up requests for street tables and chairs

Restaurants, pubs and cafes are preparing for a revolution in outdoor dining after Boris Johnson’s ‘Great Recovery Bill’ promises to speed up requests for street tables and chairs.

The prime minister has drafted the bill to cut red tape and help get the economy going again, and ministers have been told to submit ideas for reforms that should enable companies to adapt to the turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Government officials are also asked to find ways to ensure that essential services can function while maintaining social distance.

A waiter with a face mask serves at Cafe de Flore in Paris, France on June 2, while restaurants and cafes reopen after the coronavirus disease outbreak

A waiter with a face mask serves at Cafe de Flore in Paris, France on June 2, while restaurants and cafes reopen after the coronavirus disease outbreak

A waiter with a face mask serves at Cafe de Flore in Paris, France on June 2, while restaurants and cafes reopen after the coronavirus disease outbreak

Part of the red tape that ministers will focus on can be cut without the need for primary legislation.

They are already thinking about scrapping municipal fees for cafes and restaurants that want to put tables on the sidewalk.

Ministers also want to make it easier for pubs to reconfigure to serve customers outside, and simplify scheduling restrictions in the high street, making it easier for retail units to switch between stores, shops and homes.

The proposals could mean that shops can stay open all day on Sunday by suspending trade laws on Sunday for a year, according to The Times.

Cafés and pubs could quickly be allowed to serve food and drinks outside.

The plans would be merged into a legislative agenda called the Great Recovery Bill for the time being.

It will be juxtaposed with a mini-budget set for July, which is expected to include tax cuts to boost consumer spending and business investment.

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