WhatsNew2Day - Latest News And Breaking Headlines
Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Placing North West under new lockdown measures was a “hasty” decision, a top expert claims

According to a leading expert, it was an “ill-advised” decision to subject 4.5 million people in the Northwest to stringent new closure measures due to a spike in coronavirus cases.

Ministers announced last week that people from different homes in Greater Manchester, parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire would no longer meet in their homes or gardens after a peak in cases.

But Professor Carl Heneghan, director of Oxford University’s Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, claimed that Covid-19 cases don’t really rise – despite government figures showing an upward trend.

He said the rising infection rates are due to more people being tested and warned of inaccuracies in the data, telling it Daily telegram: ‘The northern closure was a hasty decision.

“Where’s the turnout? On the test date through July, nothing changes if you take into account all the extensive tests that are going on. ‘

He warned that there was an increase in the number of cases detected as a result of more targeted testing in areas such as Oldham, the second most severely affected municipality in the country, with 55.2 cases per 100,000 people in the past week.

Ministers announced last week that people from different homes in Greater Manchester, parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire would no longer meet in their homes or gardens after a peak in cases

Ministers announced last week that people from different homes in Greater Manchester, parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire would no longer meet in their homes or gardens after a peak in cases

Statistics show that nearly 500 new cases of the coronavirus were diagnosed in England in early July.

But this jumped to about 750 by the end of the month, which Professor Heneghan said was “not a sudden jump.”

Professor Heneghan added that the increase in the number of Covid-19 cases was probably due to an increase in the pillar two tests.

Pillar two tests include coronavirus swab tests that are given to the public through do-it-yourself kits sent in the mail and in drive-through centers.

Pillar one tests are tests given to NHS and caregivers, as well as to patients in the hospital.

Professor Heneghan pointed to data showing that the number of pillar two tests performed daily during July increased by 80 percent to about 80,000.

But he said the number of cases noted for every 100,000 tests is flat-lining and they actually drop for pillar one.

Professor Heneghan said it was “essential” to correct for the number of tests performed, adding, “Why is no one checking this at government level?”

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford, claimed that the cases are not rising and that the higher rates are skewed as the tests are ramped up

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford, claimed that cases are not rising and higher rates are skewed by ramping up tests

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford, claimed that the cases are not rising and that the higher rates are skewed as the tests are ramped up

THE GOVERNMENT WILL TEST SPACE TO TRACK COVID-19

The government begins testing wastewater to detect the coronavirus and can ban domestic travel to stop local outbreaks.

Infected people are believed to release coronavirus material in the faeces quickly after symptoms occur, meaning sewage may be a faster indicator of the presence of Covid-19 than smears.

This has led the government to ramp up massive sewage testing across the country after tests at 44 sites in England had been able to identify local contamination increases.

Environment Minister George Eustice said the measure would give officials a head start in addressing further outbreaks.

A wave of local flare-ups across England have prompted Downing Street to discuss radical proposals to shake up the crisis response.

This may include banning travel in and out of high infection areas as part of a ‘flexible’ strategy to prevent a new national closure and derail economic recovery.

The idea of ​​domestic travel bans has re-surfaced in the government in recent days, as it was initially touted in the early stages of the pandemic when London fell victim to it and was feared to be an epicenter.

Explain why things don’t come to mind websitehe wrote: “Leicester and Oldham have seen a significant increase in testing in a short time.

“For example, Leicester did more tests in the first two weeks of July than anywhere else in England: 15,122 tests completed in the two weeks to July 13.”

He also questioned the accuracy of the data, saying that differences in numbers “make it difficult to judge what happens in practice.”

For example, Professor Heneghan wrote that England reported 576 cases on July 28 – but the government registered only 547.

The Ministry of Health and Social Care says that “cases are reported when laboratory tests are completed and positively confirmed.”

The heads of health, explaining the numbers, say, “New cases are reported every day, but the dates they come from have covered the past few days.”

Figures Professor Heneghan analyzed the data of samples – when a person was tested for the virus, not when they were positively obliterated.

He added, “Inaccuracies in the data and poor interpretation will often lead to errors in decisions about imposing restrictions.”

Professor Heneghan warned that any interpretation of numbers should take into account “fluctuations in the speed of testing.”

Government data shows that 753 people are affected daily by the life-threatening infection across Britain.

For comparison, the moving seven-day average of coronavirus cases had fallen to 546 in early July.

It is not the first time that Professor Heneghan has identified inaccuracies in government data.

Last month, he and another statistician in Oxford, Dr. Jason Okay, that the official daily death toll was too high.

BORIS CAN PROHIBIT TRAVEL INSIDE AND OUTSIDE LOCKING AREAS

Boris Johnson could ban travel in and out of local closed areas under new plans that may protect the over-50s.

The radical proposal is currently under discussion, as Downing Street is shaking its crisis response following local flare-ups.

Ministers would like to avoid a new national closure and derail the economic recovery that could last for years.

Whitehall bosses are now working on a ‘flexible’ strategy to limit all movements in and out of target areas with high infection rates.

It means plans to shut down London in March to curb the spread of Covid-19, which was on the shelf but could be revived as part of the new targeted approach.

Civil servants have already been empowered, giving them the opportunity to impose such travel bans with police enforcement.

It is because officials have put in place plans to ask millions of people to stay home if a second wave of coronavirus infections breaks out.

One option would provide people aged 50 to 70 with personalized risk assessments as part of a significant broadening of the foreclosure program.

The pair calculated that fewer than 40 people die each day, even though figures show the moving seven-day average is still above 60.

It was found that the government classified people as Covid-19 victims if they died at any point after a positive test for the virus.

This meant that survivors would be added to the death toll, even if hit by a bus months after defeating the life-threatening infection.

The shocking discovery prompted Matt Hancock to announce an “urgent” review of how Public Health England counted the dead.

Professor Heneghan’s claims come amid growing fears of a second wave, with data suggesting that there are more and more cases.

Boris Johnson announced last week that he is “depressing the brake pedal” on lifting the coronavirus restrictions that continue to hamper some sectors of UK business.

He blamed a spike in business, with individual figures suggesting that 4,200 people now contract the virus daily in England – which has doubled since June.

But the Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimate was based on just 59 people who tested tens of thousands of positive.

Individual figures from the NHS show cases are decreasing in Blackburn, Bradford and Leicester, three of the most severely affected authorities in the country.

However, the infection rate is rising in all but three boroughs in Greater Manchester and increasing rapidly in Swindon.

It’s because the government is going to test wastewater to monitor the corona virus to stop local outbreaks.

Environment Minister George Eustice said the measure would give officials a head start in addressing further outbreaks.

Boris Johnson could also ban travel in and out of local closed areas under new plans that may protect the over-50s.

The radical proposal is currently under discussion, as Downing Street is shaking its crisis response following local flare-ups.

Ministers would like to avoid a new national closure and derail the economic recovery that could last for years.

.