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A 20,000-year-old seawater monster representing the first immediate remnant of the Earth's last ice age has been found. Here, assistant professor Clara Blättler with a bottle of seawater dating back to the last ice age - about 20,000 years ago

A sample of the Earth's ancient underground ocean that has been preserved underground for 20,000 years is being discovered in the Maldives – and scientists say it will provide clues about the changing climate of our planet

  • Scientists found the virtually untouched sample in limestone deposits
  • The piece is probably from the last ice age, which was 20,000 years ago
  • The team squeezed the water from an old rock from the Indian Ocean
  • When they examined the monster, they discovered that it was much saltier and more chlorinated than the conditions in the modern ocean
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A sample of 20,000 years old seawater that represents the first immediate remnant from the last ice age of the earth has been found virtually undisturbed.

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Researchers found the ice while drilling sediment core samples from the lime deposits under water in the Maldives in South Asia.

Their work revealed clear water properties that can only be seen in seawater from the last ice age or the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

The team, from the University of Chicago, says their work could lead to a better understanding of the changing world and improved climate models.

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A 20,000-year-old seawater monster representing the first immediate remnant of the Earth's last ice age has been found. Here, assistant professor Clara Blättler with a bottle of seawater dating back to the last ice age - about 20,000 years ago

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A 20,000-year-old seawater monster representing the first immediate remnant of the Earth's last ice age has been found. Here, assistant professor Clara Blättler with a bottle of seawater dating back to the last ice age – about 20,000 years ago

During an expedition from the Indian Ocean on research vessel JOIDES Resolution, the researchers drilled deep under the Indian Ocean and removed rock cores.

It was in these cores that they found the traces of the ancient ocean, incorporated into porous rock formations and preserved there ever since.

The small sample was pressed from an old rock formation from the Indian Ocean and cut into pieces before it was placed in a hydraulic press that squeezes the moisture from its pores.

The team tested the samples on board their ship and discovered that the water today was much saltier than that of the Indian Ocean.

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Back in the lab they did more specific tests to investigate the elements and isotopes, or variants of a certain element.

The team found that all their results were out of place in the modern ocean, according to the New scientist.

They said the monsters indicated they were from a time when the ocean was significantly saltier, colder and more chlorinated.

These are circumstances that scientists think sea water would have been during the Last Glacial Maximum when the sea level dropped to hundreds of meters below the current level.

At the time of the last ice age, huge layers of ice covered a large part of North America, Northern Europe, and Asia. Researchers found the ice while drilling sediment core samples from the lime deposits under water in the Maldives in South Asia

At the time of the last ice age, huge layers of ice covered a large part of North America, Northern Europe, and Asia. Researchers found the ice while drilling sediment core samples from the lime deposits under water in the Maldives in South Asia

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At the time of the last ice age, huge layers of ice covered a large part of North America, Northern Europe, and Asia. Researchers found the ice while drilling sediment core samples from the lime deposits under water in the Maldives in South Asia

& # 39; Of all indications, it seems pretty clear that we now have a real piece of this 20,000-year-old ocean & # 39 ;, says lead study author Clara Blättler, an assistant professor of geophysical science at the University of Chicago.

For decades, scientists have studied the last ice age of the Earth, also called the Last Glacial Maximum, which is thought to have lasted 100,000 years, by viewing coral fossils and seabed sediments.

If all results are valid, the new samples can give scientists clues as to how the ocean reacted to the geophysical fluctuations of the last ice age.

The research could also provide more insight into these shifts and lead to improved climate models.

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Mrs. Blättler said, & # 39; every model that you build from the climate should be able to accurately predict the past. & # 39;

The study will be published in the 2019 issue of the journal Geochimica and Cosmochimica Acta.

WHAT HAS GREAT BRITAIN AGAINST DURING THE LAST ICE AGE?

The last Glacial Maximum was around 22,000 years ago, when much of Europe was covered with ice.

During the ice age, which ended around 11,500 years ago, ice covered about 30 percent of the country in the world.

In Great Britain, icy ice and streams of water extend far south as the Bristol Canal.

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Average temperatures were 5 ° C (8 ° F) colder than now, which means that a one-kilometer thick piece of ice can cover a large part of the country.

The temperature remained below 0 ° C throughout the year in northern regions, particularly Scotland, which allowed the leaf to remain on land all year round.

Ice connected Great Britain with Scandinavia, allowing a large number of large wildlife to roam freely between the UK and mainland Europe.

During this period, Britain would have seen woolly mammoths, giant deer, and wolves roaming the icy regions.

Large glacial lakes covered Manchester, Doncaster, Newcastle and Peterborough and a large part of the country was uninhabitable for people.

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Corridors of fast-flowing ice, known as ice currents, flowed east over Edinburgh and toward the west of Glasgow.

All of Ireland was covered with ice that flowed through the Irish Sea, where it met Welsh ice and then flowed south toward the Isles of Scilly.

A large part of Scotland, Wales, the Midlands and Northern England was covered with eternal ice.

Covered by a huge glacial lake, Cambridge was the southernmost region that was hit hard by the icy climate.

Over time, the ice and the huge streams of water carved out the land of Great Britain and formed geological scars that can still be seen.

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These include glacial ridges sculpted by moving ice and winding streams of rock that traveled miles across the country.

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