Picasso painting sold by a Jewish man to escape from the Nazis should stay with the Met, legal rules

Picasso painting worth $ 100 million that was sold for only $ 12,000 by a German Jewish businessman to finance his escape from the Nazis should remain in the Met Met Museum in New York instead of being returned to his heirs, legal rules

  • The actor remains in the museum's collection and a court of appeal has decided on Wednesday
  • The great-grandfather of former owner Paul Leffmann demanded his return
  • But she waited too long to reclaim it, said Judge Robert Katzmann
  • Laurel Hartsuiker said that her family member sold the painting to an art dealer in Paris in 1938
  • She said the money was used to finance an escape by Paul and his wife Alice
  • The Met says it thoroughly and responsibly considers & # 39; all claims from the Nazi era & # 39;
  • & # 39; This beautiful painting was a gift to the museum and it is our responsibility and joy to share it with the widest possible audience & # 39 ;, a spokesperson added
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A $ 100 million painting by Pablo Picasso and sold by a German-Jewish businessman for only $ 12,000 to finance his escape to the Nazis must remain in the Met Museum of New York returned to his heirs, an appeal court has decided.

The actor will remain as part of the museum's collection after the 2nd American Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said Wednesday that the great-grandmother of former owner Paul Leffmann waited too long to get it back.

Laurel Hartsuiker had not demanded the return of the masterpiece until 2010, 72 years after it was sold and 58 years after it entered the Met.

She said her family member, Paul Leffmann, had sold the masterpiece to an art dealer in Paris in 1938 for $ 12,000 to fund his and his wife Alice & # 39; s escape to Switzerland from Italy, then led by Benito Mussolini, a ally of Adolf Hitler.

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Pablo Picasso The actor can reside at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York instead of being returned to the heirs of the businessman, a federal court of appeal ruled Wednesday

Pablo Picasso The actor can reside at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York instead of being returned to the heirs of the businessman, a federal court of appeal ruled Wednesday

The 2nd American Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said that Laurel Hartsuiker, pictured, the great-niece of Paul Leffmann, waited too long for not demanding the return of the painting until 2010, 72 years after it was sold and 58 years after it was donated to the Met

The 2nd American Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said that Laurel Hartsuiker, pictured, the great-niece of Paul Leffmann, waited too long for not demanding the return of the painting until 2010, 72 years after it was sold and 58 years after it was donated to the Met

The 2nd American Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said that Laurel Hartsuiker, pictured, the great-niece of Paul Leffmann, waited too long for not demanding the return of the painting until 2010, 72 years after it was sold and 58 years after it was donated to the Met

The couple, who were German Jews, had already fled Germany.

It is clear that the painting came to America and was shown in the Museum of Modern Art in 1939.

Thelma Chrysler Foy, who subsequently gave it to the Met in 1952, became the property of Thelma.

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Zuckerman had argued that Met Leffmann's ownership was not well recognized until 2011, after decades of incorrect cataloging.

But Chief Judge Robert Katzmann said it would be unfair for the Met to give up the Picasso, given the & # 39; unreasonable & # 39; delay in demanding his return.

Writing for a panel of three judges, Katzmann acknowledged that the federal law on the expropriation of the 2016 Art Removal Act and other recent measures respected the need to & # 39; some degree of justice, although incomplete & # 39; to offer victims of Nazi brutality and their heirs.

But he wrote: & # 39; This is not a case where the identity of the buyer was unknown to the seller or the lost items were difficult to find. The Met has been disadvantaged by the more than six decades that have passed since the end of the Second World War. & # 39;

Court documents said: "Indeed, more than seventy years passed between the sale of the painting in 1938 and Zuckerman's demand that the Met return the painting in 2010. & # 39;

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Zuckerman & # 39; s lawyer had no immediate comment.

A Met spokeswoman said that the museum, pictured, & # 39; thoroughly and responsibly considers all claims of the Nazi era & # 39; and that the work that has been unlawfully appropriated has returned

A Met spokeswoman said that the museum, pictured, & # 39; thoroughly and responsibly considers all claims of the Nazi era & # 39; and that the work that has been unlawfully appropriated has returned

A Met spokeswoman said that the museum, pictured, & # 39; thoroughly and responsibly considers all claims of the Nazi era & # 39; and that the work that has been unlawfully appropriated has returned

Zuckerman, pictured, said her relative had sold the masterpiece to a Paris art dealer in 1938 for $ 12,000 to finance his and his wife Alice & # 39; s escape to Switzerland from Italy

Zuckerman, pictured, said her relative had sold the masterpiece to a Paris art dealer in 1938 for $ 12,000 to finance his and his wife Alice & # 39; s escape to Switzerland from Italy

Laurel Heart Sugar

Laurel Heart Sugar

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Zuckerman, pictured, said her relative had sold the masterpiece to a Paris art dealer in 1938 for $ 12,000 to finance his and his wife Alice & # 39; s escape to Switzerland from Italy

A Met spokesperson said they have returned illegal work in the past and added: & # 39; The Met considers all claims of the Nazi era thoroughly and responsibly. & # 39;

They said: & # 39; This beautiful painting was a gift to the museum and it is our responsibility and joy to share it with the widest possible audience.

& # 39; [The Met] returned items if evidence shows that they were unlawfully appropriated during the Nazi era, which is not the case here. We are grateful that today's statement offers the opportunity to publicly exhibit this work. & # 39;

In February 2018, a judge in the lower court also chose the Met side.

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Painted during Picasso & # 39; s & # 39; Rose Period & # 39; in 1904 and 1905, & # 39; The Actor & # 39; also made news in January 2010 when an art student lost her balance and landed in it, repairing a six-inch crack.

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