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Photos show Hitler through the eyes of his bodyguard

These photos taken by Adolf Hitler’s personal bodyguard show the Fuehrer and his henchmen who gather in Nuremberg and invade Austria in the run-up to the war.

The photos were taken between 1937 and 1939 by a member of the bodyguard unit of the dictator, known as the 1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler.

The collection contains photos of Hitler who appeared on Nazi rallies, marched into Vienna after the Anschluss in 1938 and climbed a mountain near his alpine retreat in Berchtesgaden.

There are also photos of other leading Nazis, including Heinrich Himmler during a visit to Bavaria and Rudolf Hess being driven to a Nazi rally.

Hitler and fellow Nazis in uniform at the Nuremberg meeting in 1937, almost exactly two years before the war broke out. The rally at the Nuremberg parade park was an annual showpiece of propaganda for the Hitler regime. During the war, the rallying grounds were used as prison camps, where prisoners of war and forced laborers were held until it was liberated by US troops in 1945

Hitler and fellow Nazis in uniform at the Nuremberg meeting in 1937, almost exactly two years before the war broke out. The rally at the Nuremberg parade park was an annual showpiece of propaganda for the Hitler regime. During the war, the rallying grounds were used as prison camps, where prisoners of war and forced laborers were held until it was liberated by US troops in 1945

Hitler arrives in Vienna: the Fuehrer swings into the Austrian capital as he leads his Nazi comrades along a train decorated with a swastika. Nazi Germany annexed Austria in what was known as the 'Anschluss' in March 1938 and claimed popular support for the move after 99.7 percent of voters supposedly supported the annexation after a referendum in April 1938

Hitler arrives in Vienna: the Fuehrer swings into the Austrian capital as he leads his Nazi comrades along a train decorated with a swastika. Nazi Germany annexed Austria in what was known as the ‘Anschluss’ in March 1938 and claimed popular support for the move after 99.7 percent of voters supposedly supported the annexation after a referendum in April 1938

This photo is entitled 'Nuremberg beer tastes great' and shows five men in Nazi uniforms taking a sip from a beer glass while out of service during the Nuremberg meeting. The sign behind them refers to the Panzer division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler, Hitler's personal bodyguard unit and included the guard who took these photos

This photo is entitled 'Nuremberg beer tastes great' and shows five men in Nazi uniforms taking a sip from a beer glass while out of service during the Nuremberg meeting. The sign behind them refers to the Panzer division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler, Hitler's personal bodyguard unit and included the guard who took these photos

This photo is entitled ‘Nuremberg beer tastes great’ and shows five men in Nazi uniforms taking a sip from a beer glass while out of service during the Nuremberg meeting. The sign behind them refers to the Panzer division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler, Hitler’s personal bodyguard unit and included the guard who took these photos

Rudolf Hess in the passenger seat of a car during a Nazi meeting in the run-up to the war. Hess was Hitler's deputy for most of the 1930s, but fled Germany in 1941 and landed in Scotland where he was arrested. After the war, he was sentenced to life imprisonment during the Nuremberg trials. He was imprisoned for the rest of his long life in the prison of Spandau until he finally died in 1987

Rudolf Hess in the passenger seat of a car during a Nazi meeting in the run-up to the war. Hess was Hitler's deputy for most of the 1930s, but fled Germany in 1941 and landed in Scotland where he was arrested. After the war, he was sentenced to life imprisonment during the Nuremberg trials. He was imprisoned for the rest of his long life in the prison of Spandau until he finally died in 1987

Rudolf Hess in the passenger seat of a car during a Nazi meeting in the run-up to the war. Hess was Hitler’s deputy for most of the 1930s, but fled Germany in 1941 and landed in Scotland where he was arrested. After the war, he was sentenced to life imprisonment during the Nuremberg trials. He was imprisoned for the rest of his long life in the prison of Spandau until he finally died in 1987

Heinrich Himmler (third from the left) visits Untersberg near Berchtesgaden together with others in Nazi uniforms in the run-up to the war. The Untersberg mountain lies along the border between Germany and Austria. Himmler was currently head of the SS and head of the German police, roles that would later give him a central role in the Holocaust. He committed suicide in 1945

Heinrich Himmler (third from the left) visits Untersberg near Berchtesgaden together with others in Nazi uniforms in the run-up to the war. The Untersberg mountain lies along the border between Germany and Austria. Himmler was currently head of the SS and head of the German police, roles that would later give him a central role in the Holocaust. He committed suicide in 1945

Heinrich Himmler (third from the left) visits Untersberg near Berchtesgaden together with others in Nazi uniforms in the run-up to the war. The Untersberg mountain lies along the border between Germany and Austria. Himmler was currently head of the SS and head of the German police, roles that would later give him a central role in the Holocaust. He committed suicide in 1945

Hermann Goering's house in Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, was depicted before the war. Goering has been on Hitler's side since 1923 and received the highest possible rank in the Wehrmacht during the war

Hermann Goering's house in Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, was depicted before the war. Goering has been on Hitler's side since 1923 and received the highest possible rank in the Wehrmacht during the war

Hermann Goering’s house in Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, was depicted before the war. Goering has been on Hitler’s side since 1923 and received the highest possible rank in the Wehrmacht during the war

This photo, titled 'Landhuis van Hermann', shows the same building in Berchtesgaden after it was redeveloped in 1941. The driveway to the building is decorated with Nazi flags. Goering committed suicide in 1945 hours before he was executed after he was found guilty of crimes against humanity during the Nuremberg trials

This photo, titled 'Landhuis van Hermann', shows the same building in Berchtesgaden after it was redeveloped in 1941. The driveway to the building is decorated with Nazi flags. Goering committed suicide in 1945 hours before he was executed after he was found guilty of crimes against humanity during the Nuremberg trials

This photo, titled ‘Landhuis van Hermann’, shows the same building in Berchtesgaden after it was redeveloped in 1941. The driveway to the building is decorated with Nazi flags. Goering committed suicide in 1945 hours before he was executed after he was found guilty of crimes against humanity during the Nuremberg trials

Many of the 170 photos are of bodyguards, including photos of soldiers drinking beer while out of service.

The unit was responsible for monitoring the “person, offices and homes” of the Fuehrer, but later developed into a full infantry regiment that participated in the German occupation of Poland and France.

Several of the photos were taken in Nuremberg, where the Nazis held a huge annual gathering as a propaganda presentation for the Hitler regime.

Nuremberg took on a different meaning after the war as the place where many prominent Nazis were tried for war crimes and some of them were sentenced to death.

There are also several photos near Berchtesgaden in the Bavarian Alps, where Hitler had a mountain residence.

The Berghof residence was the location where British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain visited the Fuehrer in 1938, before returning to Britain and declaring infamous “peace for our time.”

Hermann Goering also had a house nearby, which is shown in the collection after it has been renovated and the driveway is decorated with Nazi flags.

Hitler’s deputy Rudolf Hess can also be seen in the photos, two years before he flew to Scotland to seek peace with the British without Hitler’s knowledge.

A pre-war football match in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. The stadium was built for the 1936 Olympic Games, which were an important propaganda showpiece for the Nazi regime. But everything did not go according to plan for Hitler, because black American runner Jesse Owens showed the nonsense of Hitler's racing theories by winning four gold medals and the German soccer team lost to Norway

A pre-war football match in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. The stadium was built for the 1936 Olympic Games, which were an important propaganda showpiece for the Nazi regime. But everything did not go according to plan for Hitler, because black American runner Jesse Owens showed the nonsense of Hitler's racing theories by winning four gold medals and the German soccer team lost to Norway

A pre-war football match in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. The stadium was built for the 1936 Olympic Games, which were an important propaganda showpiece for the Nazi regime. But everything did not go according to plan for Hitler, because black American runner Jesse Owens showed the nonsense of Hitler’s racing theories by winning four gold medals and the German soccer team lost to Norway

Hitler greets his own greeting and receives the same gesture from uniformed Nazis during a parade in the 1930s. The execution of the greeting, known in German as the Hitlergruß or 'Hitler greeting', is now illegal in Germany

Hitler greets his own greeting and receives the same gesture from uniformed Nazis during a parade in the 1930s. The execution of the greeting, known in German as the Hitlergruß or 'Hitler greeting', is now illegal in Germany

Hitler greets his own greeting and receives the same gesture from uniformed Nazis during a parade in the 1930s. The execution of the greeting, known in German as the Hitlergruß or ‘Hitler greeting’, is now illegal in Germany

Hitler and his guard in Berchtesgaden before the war broke out. By 1938, Hitler's grip on power was such that the Nazis claimed to have won 98.9 percent of the votes in a fake election that endorsed the Fuehrer's regime. No free elections had taken place since November 1932 and the next free elections in a united Germany would not take place until 1990

Hitler and his guard in Berchtesgaden before the war broke out. By 1938, Hitler's grip on power was such that the Nazis claimed to have won 98.9 percent of the votes in a fake election that endorsed the Fuehrer's regime. No free elections had taken place since November 1932 and the next free elections in a united Germany would not take place until 1990

Hitler and his guard in Berchtesgaden before the war broke out. By 1938, Hitler’s grip on power was such that the Nazis claimed to have won 98.9 percent of the votes in a fake election that endorsed the Fuehrer’s regime. No free elections had taken place since November 1932 and the next free elections in a united Germany would not take place until 1990

Troops on their way to one of the Autobahns that were built in the 1930s. Despite the popular myth, the Nazis did not invent the Autobahn and the construction of the motorways created fewer jobs than the Nazis had initially promised.

Troops on their way to one of the Autobahns that were built in the 1930s. Despite the popular myth, the Nazis did not invent the Autobahn and the construction of the motorways created fewer jobs than the Nazis had initially promised.

Troops on their way to one of the Autobahns that were built in the 1930s. Despite the popular myth, the Nazis did not invent the Autobahn and the construction of the motorways created fewer jobs than the Nazis had initially promised.

Hitler walks past swastika flags and receives the Nazi salute when he arrives for a rally in Kiel, northern Germany. This short photo was taken by one of his personal bodyguards who took care of the Führer and his houses and offices

Hitler walks past swastika flags and receives the Nazi salute when he arrives for a rally in Kiel, northern Germany. This short photo was taken by one of his personal bodyguards who took care of the Führer and his houses and offices

Hitler walks past swastika flags and receives the Nazi salute when he arrives for a rally in Kiel, northern Germany. This short photo was taken by one of his personal bodyguards who took care of the Führer and his houses and offices

'Gardens of the new Reich Chancellery': this photo shows the exterior decorations at Hitler's headquarters in Berlin, which he inherited after he took power in 1933. Hitler died in a nearby bunker in 1945 and the building has since been demolished

'Gardens of the new Reich Chancellery': this photo shows the exterior decorations at Hitler's headquarters in Berlin, which he inherited after he took power in 1933. Hitler died in a nearby bunker in 1945 and the building has since been demolished

‘Gardens of the new Reich Chancellery’: this photo shows the exterior decorations at Hitler’s headquarters in Berlin, which he inherited after he took power in 1933. Hitler died in a nearby bunker in 1945 and the building has since been demolished

On this photo it says 'a break in the Grunewald'. It shows members of the LSSAH - the Panzer division named after Hitler who supplied the personal bodyguard of the Führer, but later grew into a broader military unit - in the Grunewald forest west of Berlin

On this photo it says 'a break in the Grunewald'. It shows members of the LSSAH - the Panzer division named after Hitler who supplied the personal bodyguard of the Führer, but later grew into a broader military unit - in the Grunewald forest west of Berlin

On this photo it says ‘a break in the Grunewald’. It shows members of the LSSAH – the Panzer division named after Hitler who supplied the personal bodyguard of the Führer, but later grew into a broader military unit – in the Grunewald forest west of Berlin

The beautiful Alpine landscape around Berchtesgaden, in the south of Germany near the border with Austria, where Hitler withdrew into the mountains. Hitler’s home was known as the Berghof and was the location where he met Neville Chamberlain for the 1938 conference that ended in the British Prime Minister who declared infamous “peace for our time”

Hitler arrives to dedicate the first stone of the new German stadium in Nuremberg, near the location of the Nazi rally site. The stadium, designed by Hitler's chief architect Albert Speer, was intended for more than 400,000 people, but like many of Hitler's ambitious building plans, it never became successful after the war interrupted work on the stadium

Hitler arrives to dedicate the first stone of the new German stadium in Nuremberg, near the location of the Nazi rally site. The stadium, designed by Hitler's chief architect Albert Speer, was intended for more than 400,000 people, but like many of Hitler's ambitious building plans, it never became successful after the war interrupted work on the stadium

Hitler arrives to dedicate the first stone of the new German stadium in Nuremberg, near the location of the Nazi rally site. The stadium, designed by Hitler’s chief architect Albert Speer, was intended for more than 400,000 people, but like many of Hitler’s ambitious building plans, it never became successful after the war interrupted work on the stadium

An entrance to the rooms of Hitler in the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. The portrait appears to be of Paul von Hindenburg, who was President of Germany from 1925 until his death in 1934, and Hitler appointed Chancellor in 1933

An entrance to the rooms of Hitler in the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. The portrait appears to be of Paul von Hindenburg, who was President of Germany from 1925 until his death in 1934, and Hitler appointed Chancellor in 1933

An entrance to the rooms of Hitler in the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. The portrait appears to be of Paul von Hindenburg, who was President of Germany from 1925 until his death in 1934, and Hitler appointed Chancellor in 1933

Members of Hitler's bodyguard unit drink a drink with a view of the Alps in the background

Members of Hitler's bodyguard unit drink a drink with a view of the Alps in the background

The Führer himself is depicted on a supposed walk to the top

The Führer himself is depicted on a supposed walk to the top

Two photos from the Berchtesgaden neighborhood: members of Hitler’s bodyguard unit drink a drink with a view of the Alps in the background (left), and the Führer himself is depicted on a supposed hike to the top (right)

The photo album was seized as a souvenir by a British soldier who served in Germany at the end of the war.

He brought it home and kept it for the rest of his life, and after his death his cousin found it locked up in his safe.

It is now on sale at Oxfordshire auctioneers Jones and Jacob for £ 2,200.

Auctioneer Simon Jones said: ‘It comes from a client whose deceased uncle served in World War II and took it home.

“We don’t know exactly where he got it, but he must have been in the right place at the right time.

“It’s been in the family since the end of the war. Our salesman inherited it and found it in a safe.

“About 75 percent of the photos are Nazi party leaders hanging around to be arrogant. There are all kinds of occasions, mostly Nazi meetings such as Nuremberg.

‘As far as we know, these photos have never been seen by anyone. The person who took them clearly had access to Hitler. We have received a lot of interest. “

The sale takes place tomorrow.

Members of Hitler’s bodyguard unit enjoy bottled beer during an indoor drinking session in the run-up to the war. The unit was responsible for monitoring the “person, offices and homes” of the Fuehrer

Members of the LSSAH bodyguard unit wear SS vests at Hitler's Alpine retreat near Berchtesgaden. Some SS members later came to the fore in post-war West Germany, some admitted their previous positions, while others kept them secret

Members of the LSSAH bodyguard unit wear SS vests at Hitler's Alpine retreat near Berchtesgaden. Some SS members later came to the fore in post-war West Germany, some admitted their previous positions, while others kept them secret

Members of the LSSAH bodyguard unit wear SS vests at Hitler’s Alpine retreat near Berchtesgaden. Some SS members later came to the fore in post-war West Germany, some admitted their previous positions, while others kept them secret

Hitler leaves the Berghof in civilian clothing

Hitler leaves the Berghof in civilian clothing

A guard outside the Berghof

A guard outside the Berghof

Hitler leaves his Berghof mountain house (left), where there is also a guard outside (right). Hitler was born in Austria, but was established after the First World War in Bavaria in southern Germany and tried to seize power there in 1923

Members of the Reich Labor Service who marched in Nuremberg in 1937. The labor service (RAD in German), founded in 1935, was intended to keep the German labor force out of unemployment and to indoctrinate people with Nazi-military ideology

Members of the Reich Labor Service who marched in Nuremberg in 1937. The labor service (RAD in German), founded in 1935, was intended to keep the German labor force out of unemployment and to indoctrinate people with Nazi-military ideology

Members of the Reich Labor Service who marched in Nuremberg in 1937. The labor service founded in 1935 (RAD in German) was intended to keep German workers unemployed and to indoctrinate people with Nazi-military ideology

Hans Tidow, one of the officers in Hitler's bodyguard, rides a horse in the 1930s. He was killed on September 12, 1939, just over a week after the war broke out when Britain and France declared war after the German invasion of Poland.

Hans Tidow, one of the officers in Hitler's bodyguard, rides a horse in the 1930s. He was killed on September 12, 1939, just over a week after the war broke out when Britain and France declared war after the German invasion of Poland.

Hans Tidow, one of the officers in Hitler’s bodyguard, rides a horse in the 1930s. He was killed on September 12, 1939, just over a week after the war broke out when Britain and France declared war after the German invasion of Poland.

Mobile kitchens known as 'goulash cannons' are parked outside a building in the 1930s. Even the food carts bore the logo of the SS, the paramilitary group that imposed terror on Germany and the countries that occupied it during the war

Mobile kitchens known as 'goulash cannons' are parked outside a building in the 1930s. Even the food carts bore the logo of the SS, the paramilitary group that imposed terror on Germany and the countries that occupied it during the war

Mobile kitchens known as ‘goulash cannons’ are parked outside a building in the 1930s. Even the food carts bore the logo of the SS, the paramilitary group that imposed terror on Germany and the countries that occupied it during the war

A view of the Reichstag building in Berlin in the 1930s. The seat of the German parliament, or the Reichstag as it was then called, was set on fire in 1933 in an outburst that the Nazis used as an excuse to strengthen their hold on power. Whether they played a role in the arson is still unclear. The building was abandoned during the Cold War but has since been renovated

A view of the Reichstag building in Berlin in the 1930s. The seat of the German parliament, or the Reichstag as it was then called, was set on fire in 1933 in an outburst that the Nazis used as an excuse to strengthen their hold on power. Whether they played a role in the arson is still unclear. The building was abandoned during the Cold War but has since been renovated

A view of the Reichstag building in Berlin in the 1930s. The seat of the German parliament, or the Reichstag as it was then called, was set on fire in 1933 in an outburst that the Nazis used as an excuse to strengthen their hold on power. Whether they played a role in the arson is still unclear. The building was abandoned during the Cold War but has since been renovated

This photo is caption 'four comrades' and shows uniformed members of Hitler's bodyguard unit posing for a photo in the snowy Grunewald forest, west of Berlin, in winter

This photo is caption 'four comrades' and shows uniformed members of Hitler's bodyguard unit posing for a photo in the snowy Grunewald forest, west of Berlin, in winter

This photo is caption ‘four comrades’ and shows uniformed members of Hitler’s bodyguard unit posing for a photo in the snowy Grunewald forest, west of Berlin, in winter

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