Photos of migrants from the Windrush period who found sanctuary in Great Britain from 1938 to 1956

Striking photos telling the stories of refugees and immigrants who came to Britain after the First World War will be revealed for the first time.

Advertisements

The images of migrations through Kindertransport and Windrush era, as well as African Red American volunteers from the Red Cross in wartime is exhibited in a new exhibition in Birkbeck & # 39; s Peltz Gallery.

Assembled for the first time, the prints of renowned emigrants Gerti Deutsch and Kurt Hutton, together with Bert Hardy and Haywood Magee, originally appeared in Picture Post magazine.

With his & # 39; impudent anti-fascist editorial attitude & # 39; The magazine was founded in 1938 by the Hungarian-Jewish refugee Stefan Lorant and once sold a million copies a week while focusing on issues of displacement, migration and ethnicity amid the changing face of war and post-war Britain.

Photos show how refugees from the Nazis and Afro-Caribbean immigrants made their home in Britain and helped rebuild the country after the war.

The exhibition also includes images of post-war Holocaust survivors for children who have found refuge in the Lake District.

December 17, 1938: Three of the hundreds of Jewish German children who arrived in Britain to escape persecution upon arrival at the Dovercourt Bay holiday camp near Harwich. They all carry a tag with his name

Advertisements

December 17, 1938: Three of the hundreds of Jewish German children who arrived in Britain to escape persecution upon arrival at the Dovercourt Bay holiday camp near Harwich. They all carry a tag with his name

October 31, 1942: The first five African-American maids of the American Red Cross arrive in Great Britain during World War II, Bristol, October 1942. They are in the United Kingdom to run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street - a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Great Britain. From left to right: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Henrine Ward, from Chicago, Illinois, Carol Jarett, from Denver, Colorado, Magnolia Latimer, from Atlanta, Georgia, and Gladys Edward Martin, from Topeka, Kansas. Original publication: Picture Post, edition 1277

October 31, 1942: The first five African-American maids of the American Red Cross arrive in Great Britain during World War II, Bristol, October 1942. They are in the United Kingdom to run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street - a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Great Britain. From left to right: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Henrine Ward, from Chicago, Illinois, Carol Jarett, from Denver, Colorado, Magnolia Latimer, from Atlanta, Georgia, and Gladys Edward Martin, from Topeka, Kansas. Original publication: Picture Post, edition 1277

October 31, 1942: The first five African-American maids of the American Red Cross arrive in Great Britain during World War II, Bristol, October 1942. They are in the United Kingdom to run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street – a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Great Britain. From left to right: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Henrine Ward, from Chicago, Illinois, Carol Jarett, from Denver, Colorado, Magnolia Latimer, from Atlanta, Georgia, and Gladys Edward Martin, from Topeka, Kansas. Original publication: Picture Post, edition 1277

Young Jewish refugees in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. Known as the Calgarth Housing Estate, the camp is run by the Central British Jewish Relief Fund for young people rescued from the Holocaust. Original publication: Picture Post - 4003

Young Jewish refugees in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. Known as the Calgarth Housing Estate, the camp is run by the Central British Jewish Relief Fund for young people rescued from the Holocaust. Original publication: Picture Post - 4003

Young Jewish refugees in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. Known as the Calgarth Housing Estate, the camp is run by the Central British Jewish Relief Fund for young people rescued from the Holocaust. Original publication: Picture Post – 4003

July 2, 1949: a couple walking through a street in London. The photo was published in the Picture Post - 4825, under the heading & # 39; Is There A British Color Bar & # 39 ;. Striking stories with images, with titles like & # 39; Their first day in England & # 39; or & # 39; Is there a British color bar? & # 39 ;, Picture Post showed as clearly noticeable for the changing face of wartime and post-war England.

July 2, 1949: a couple walking through a street in London. The photo was published in the Picture Post - 4825, under the heading & # 39; Is There A British Color Bar & # 39 ;. Striking stories with images, with titles like & # 39; Their first day in England & # 39; or & # 39; Is there a British color bar? & # 39 ;, Picture Post showed as clearly noticeable for the changing face of wartime and post-war England.

July 2, 1949: a couple walking through a street in London. The photo was published in the Picture Post – 4825, under the heading & # 39; Is There A British Color Bar & # 39 ;. Striking stories with images, with titles like & # 39; Their first day in England & # 39; or & # 39; Is there a British color bar? & # 39; showed Picture Post as clearly noticeable for the changing face of wartime and post-war Britain

Advertisements

October 31, 1942: This photo was in the Picture Post, 1277 under the title & # 39; The First Colored Service Girls go to work in Great Britain & # 39 ;. Gladys Edward Martin, from Topeka, Kansas, one of the first five African-American servants of the American Red Cross, arrived in Great Britain during World War II, Bristol, October 1942. Former Social Service Director at Homer Phillips Hospital in St. Louis, she was in the UK to help run the American Red Cross Club

Exhibition curator Amanda Hopkinson, daughter of photographer Gerti Deutsch and publisher Tom Hopkinson, and Honorary Research Professor, City University, said: & # 39; Since 1938, Picture Post has been the best-selling weekly magazine of the common people, although produced by some very individual talents .

& # 39; It brought the UK a continental tradition of photojournalism combined with a & # 39; strong political and anti-fascist & editorial position – and an eye for the unexpected and funny. His legacy continues to influence photojournalism to this day. & # 39;

Mike Berlin (Birkbeck), co-curator for exhibitions, added: “As we approach the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of the Second World War, it is an appropriate time to mark the extraordinary contribution to British life by Nazi refugees, in addition to the remarkable role of Afro-Caribbean immigrants. Both groups settled here and contributed to the reconstruction of post-war England. & # 39;

Advertisements

Refugees, newcomers, citizens: migration stories from Picture Post, 1938-1956, run from June 3 – July 5 at the Peltz Gallery, located at the School of Arts in Birkbeck. Book free tickets here

Picture Post - 42: & # 39; Their First Day In England & # 39 ;, published December 17, 1938: a German Jewish boy, one of hundreds who, as part of the & # 39; Kindertransport & # 39; arrived in Great Britain, the dinner bell rings at camp Dovercourt Bay, near Harwich in Essex, 1938. Their names and addresses were kept secret to protect those who left them behind

Picture Post - 42: & # 39; Their First Day In England & # 39 ;, published December 17, 1938: a German Jewish boy, one of hundreds who, as part of the & # 39; Kindertransport & # 39; arrived in Great Britain, the dinner bell rings at camp Dovercourt Bay, near Harwich in Essex, 1938. Their names and addresses were kept secret to protect those who left them behind

Picture Post – 42: & # 39; Their First Day In England & # 39 ;, published December 17, 1938: a German Jewish boy, one of hundreds who, as part of the & # 39; Kindertransport & # 39; arrived in Great Britain, the dinner bell rings at camp Dovercourt Bay, near Harwich in Essex, 1938. Their names and addresses were kept secret to protect those who left them behind

October 31, 1942: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the first five African-American servants of the American Red Cross who arrived in Britain in World War II, Bristol, October 1942. A graduate and social worker, she was in the UK to help the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street - a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Britain

October 31, 1942: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the first five African-American servants of the American Red Cross who arrived in Britain in World War II, Bristol, October 1942. A graduate and social worker, she was in the UK to help the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street - a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Britain

October 31, 1942: Mrs. Sydney Taylor Brown from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the first five African-American servants of the American Red Cross who arrived in Britain in World War II, Bristol, October 1942. A graduate and social worker, she was in the UK to help the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street – a club for black soldiers only and the first of its kind in Britain

1956: West Indian immigrants arrive at Victoria Station, London, after their journey from Southampton Docks. Original publication: Picture Post, number 8405
Advertisements

1956: West Indian immigrants arrive at Victoria Station, London, after their journey from Southampton Docks. Original publication: Picture Post, number 8405

1956: West Indian immigrants arrive at Victoria Station, London, after their journey from Southampton Docks. Original publication: Picture Post, number 8405

July 2, 1949: a West Indian couple dancing in a bar in Great Britain. Picture Post magazine, founded in 1938 by the Hungarian-Jewish refugee Stefan Lorant, brought an innovative continental photojournalistic tradition to Britain and selling more than a million copies every week. From the outset, it had an unabashed anti-fascist editorial line-up, with a unique sensitivity to relocation, migration and ethnicity issues - and included this type of photo under the title & Is There A British Color Bar? & # 39 ;

July 2, 1949: a West Indian couple dancing in a bar in Great Britain. Picture Post magazine, founded in 1938 by the Hungarian-Jewish refugee Stefan Lorant, brought an innovative continental photojournalistic tradition to Britain and selling more than a million copies every week. From the outset, it had an unabashed anti-fascist editorial line-up, with a unique sensitivity to relocation, migration and ethnicity issues - and included this type of photo under the title & Is There A British Color Bar? & # 39 ;

July 2, 1949: a West Indian couple dancing in a bar in Great Britain. Picture Post magazine, founded in 1938 by the Hungarian-Jewish refugee Stefan Lorant, brought an innovative continental photojournalistic tradition to Britain and selling more than a million copies every week. From the outset, it had an unabashed anti-fascist editorial line-up, with a unique sensitivity to relocation, migration and ethnicity issues – and included this type of photo under the title & Is There A British Color Bar? & # 39 ;

1956: Immigrants arriving at Victoria Station, London. Originally published in Picture Post, 8405, under the title & # 39; Thirtyandous Color Problems & # 39 ;. The exhibition celebrates the contribution to British life by very different groups of immigrants, commemorating their specific experiences of loss, expropriation and uprooting

1956: Immigrants arriving at Victoria Station, London. Originally published in Picture Post, 8405, under the title & # 39; Thirtyandous Color Problems & # 39 ;. The exhibition celebrates the contribution to British life by very different groups of immigrants, commemorating their specific experiences of loss, expropriation and uprooting

Advertisements

1956: Immigrants arriving at Victoria Station, London. Originally published in Picture Post, 8405, under the title & # 39; Thirtyandous Color Problems & # 39 ;. The exhibition celebrates the contribution to British life by very different groups of immigrants, commemorating their specific experiences of loss, expropriation and uprooting

A young Jewish refugee in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. The exhibition confronts various, yet parallel stories about migration and settlement

A young Jewish refugee in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. The exhibition confronts various, yet parallel stories about migration and settlement

A young Jewish refugee in a camp near Windermere in Cumbria, 1946. The exhibition confronts various, yet parallel stories about migration and settlement

October 31, 1942: Henrine Ward in Chicago, Illinois. A former dean of a women's college and director of women's work at the Chicago Y.W.C.A, who also helped run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street

October 31, 1942: Henrine Ward in Chicago, Illinois. A former dean of a women's college and director of women's work at the Chicago Y.W.C.A, who also helped run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street

October 31, 1942: Henrine Ward in Chicago, Illinois. A former dean of a women's college and director of women's work at the Chicago Y.W.C.A, who also helped run the American Red Cross Club on Great George Street

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news

- Advertisement -