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Photo of British Airways cooked breakfast leaves Twitter users horrified at ‘baby vomit’ eggs

Have you seen worse?

Email me: laurence.dollimore@mailonline.co.uk

A breakfast on a first-class British Airways flight has been labeled ‘disgusting’ by social media users for its ‘baby fallow eggs’, ‘phallic-looking’ sausage and ‘unidentifiable’ food items.

Twitter users were stunned by the ‘involved’ meal, after a photo shared on the site appeared to show three baked potatoes, ‘blue’ scrambled eggs, a long pink sausage and mushrooms.

There was also a burger patty on the plate – though the jury is still out, some believe it’s filling.

“Trying to figure out what the hell the items are is a fun game,” joked one Twitter user, as one compared the eggs to “whatever my cat brings up after feeding on rodents.”

The photo was shared by consumer expert and TV presenter Jane Hawkes, who claims the meal was served on a BA flight from Abuja in Nigeria.

Ms Hawkes told MailOnline that she had been given the photo by a friend who had flown from the African capital to London Heathrow.

The photo was shared by consumer expert and TV presenter Jane Hawkes, who claims the meal was served on a BA flight from Abuja, Nigeria.

The photo was shared by consumer expert and TV presenter Jane Hawkes, who claims the meal was served on a BA flight from Abuja, Nigeria.

Ms Hawkes told MailOnline she had been given the photo by a friend who had flown from the African capital to London Heathrow (stock image)

Ms Hawkes told MailOnline she had been given the photo by a friend who had flown from the African capital to London Heathrow (stock image)

“He only shared it because he was so disgusted,” she said, “he didn’t expect it to go viral.”

She added that she was still trying to figure out what was on the sign.

A first class ticket between London and Abuja costs over £7,000.

“God help the other passengers if that’s what first class gets!” another tweeted.

Others compared the eggs to papier-mâché, while another joked, “The sausage looks like it’s missing its testicles.”

‘Where are the beans?’ another stated, while another simply said, “That scrambled egg color is seriously concerning.”

“That sausage-like thing looks like something out of Stranger Things,” another joked.

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'Since when were eggs gray?': Twitter users react to the 'disgusting' breakfast, comparing it to papier-mâché and cat vomit

‘Since when were eggs gray?’: Twitter users react to the ‘disgusting’ breakfast, comparing it to papier-mâché and cat vomit

Others came in BA’s defense, sharing photos of “delicious” meals they’d had recently on both business and first-class routes.

A frequent flyer suggested there may be a difference in the quality of in-flight meals depending on where the plane departs.

MailOnline has contacted BA for comment.

It comes after Which? assembled a photo gallery of some of the worst onboard meals served to its readers in 2019, before the pandemic brought international travel as we knew it to a halt.

The consumer group said some dishes looked really stomach cramping, adding: “We’re talking about everything from chicken soup to cake that could also serve as a ‘building block’.

It added: “And it would be wrong to assume that an upgrade to a superior cabin will save you from a culinary nightmare if our members’ experiences turn out to be anything.”

Passengers who flew around the world just before the pandemic shared their horrific photos of airplane food, including this one of Ryanair passenger Billy Shearer, who spent €10 on this Irish breakfast

Passengers who flew around the world just before the pandemic shared their horrific photos of airplane food, including this one of Ryanair passenger Billy Shearer, who spent €10 on this Irish breakfast

Meanwhile, another customer revealed his unappetizing meal from Spice Jet, complete with soggy omelette

Meanwhile, another customer revealed his unappetizing meal from Spice Jet, complete with soggy omelette

Airlines have claimed in the past to go to great lengths, sometimes hiring celebrity chefs, to produce good quality meals in difficult circumstances.

There is some evidence that conditions on board an aircraft, such as air pressure and temperature, alter the taste of food and drinks.

Oddly enough, there is science showing that even the sound of the cabin engine can change the way people experience food.

However, the evidence of the Which? research suggests that these dishes could not be kept, even if served under a silver salver in one of the world’s finest hotels.

Ryanair passenger Billy Shearer made the mistake of ordering Irish breakfast before a morning flight based on the company’s description as ‘the perfect option to refuel and start your day’.

In the company magazine it was listed as 10 euros, while the picture showed two delicious slices of bacon, two sausages, hash browns, white pudding, a tomato and some slices of what looks like rustic brown bread.

Traveler David Ball shared his 'business class' deluxe chicken Biriyani, saying the meal was as 'terrible' as it looked

Traveler David Ball shared his ‘business class’ deluxe chicken Biriyani, saying the meal was as ‘terrible’ as it looked

However, the unfortunate diner begged to be different when he ripped off the plastic and found a “sample” of soggy potato wafer, shriveled mushrooms and congealed white pudding.

Carriers seemed to have a particular problem with breakfast. A full English served by BA included a portion of scrambled eggs that were virtually unrecognizable due to the odd color and consistency, alongside sweaty mushrooms.

Nick Avery, who flew Indian airline SpiceJet, said: ‘I now know why most passengers opted for a curry breakfast.

“Apparently it was an omelette, sausages and hash brown. It tasted as good as it looked.’

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